Paperback Þ A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Portugues

Paperback Þ A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Portugues


A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Portugues LisboaPortoSantiago [Read] ➪ A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Portugues LisboaPortoSantiago By John Brierley – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Updated to include newer maps and photos and weighing less to support carefree traveling the latest edition in these comprehensive guidebooks to the Camino de Santiago and its offshoots contains all t Updated to include Guide to eBook ´ newer maps and photos and weighing less to support carefree traveling the latest edition in these comprehensive guidebooks to the Camino de Santiago and its offshoots contains all the information needed by modern day pilgrims wishing to walk A Pilgrim's MOBI :Ú the sacred Way of Saint James Overview route planners plus all daily stage maps and detailed town plans help sojourners with as much advance preparation as they need The completely redone maps feature contour guides to help distinguish the terrain that Pilgrim's Guide to PDF ☆ will be crossed each day while full information on all pilgrim hostels as well as details for alternative accommodation allow travelers to plot adeuate nightly stopping points All reference information is accompanied by helpful spiritual guidelines to support the seeker's inner journey Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Epub / as well as the outer pilgrimage For travelers who wish to walk the coast of Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Epub / Portugal this volume has been expanded from its previous edition to cover the entire pilgrimage from Lisbon to Porto to Santiago.

  • Paperback
  • 240 pages
  • A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Portugues LisboaPortoSantiago
  • John Brierley
  • Spanish
  • 20 October 2016
  • 9781844095926

10 thoughts on “A Pilgrim's Guide to the Camino Portugues LisboaPortoSantiago

  1. Fatma Fatma says:

    I went first for the german guide of Raimond Joss but I got really confused while reading Brierley's I find so much easier as a guide

  2. Kc Kc says:

    Not nearly as helpful as his Frances book for planning I think it is due to the multiple route options he attempts to cover There is not enough information about the smaller towns I found a lot of what was missing through a Portuguese association though Still a great resource because otherwise I would be heading in blind The detour routes were necessary as they cover areas I really wanted to trek through Having finished the book I’m even excited for Camino #2

  3. Ralph N Ralph N says:

    Though there’s ample signage and online guides it’s still very useful to have this guide

  4. Liralen Liralen says:

    When I walked the Camino Francés I didn't have a guidebook—I'd read enough about the route to not worry too much about the details and anyway when a guidebook really was helpful there was always somebody else around who had one It's not a decision that I ever regretted although I did think that were I to do the Camino again I'd bring a guidebookWhen I reached the end and then immediately started the Camino Portugués I knew I needed a guide it's far less travelled than the French Way and I knew approximately nothing about it So I scoured bookshops in Porto for a guidebook in English man at bookshop #2 'We only have guides in Portuguesebut we also have Portuguese English dictionaries?' and ended up with a Brierley bookBrierley is—probably rightly—considered one of the major players in Camino guidebooks It was tremendously useful to have a guide especially early on; what's he was usually right eg I should have started walking just outside Porto to save my feet 265 kilometers of paved road; the road into Porriño was truly a 'soulless slog' That saidhaving walked through northern Portugal and southern Galicia with BrierleyI think I'd do my research but not take a guidebook next timeBrierley's good but he's shocker not infallible This is a recent copy—published in February of this year; I did the Portuguese route in June—but there were already places mentioned by Brierley that looked permanently shuttered The maps occasionally omit useful things like the name of a town where an optional route breaks off The section on Santiago is missing a whole chunk of information about albergues 'see previous pages' it says but the info isn't there; not sure if this is a printer's error or what; Brierley's personal reflections stop abruptly near the end with no explanation could be intentional but looks like an error; there were enough minor typos to put me on my guard about the veracity of things like distancesThis isn't so much an indictment of Brierley as it is a reminder to be cautious about guidebooks in general Among other things Brierley has useful historical info and details on sights and attractions within the towns one passes through which many of the smaller guidebooks don't have and this guidebook is neither large nor heavy; the information on albergues and other accommodations and so on is generally easy to find at a glance That said it's harder to use if you're not following Brierley's suggested stages—harder to work out distances and with less information on towns that he doesn't suggest staying inRecommended with reservations some specific to this book and some general

  5. Donna R Donna R says:

    A treasure trove for novice pilgrims

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