Grass for My Pillow PDF/EPUB í Grass for MOBI

Grass for My Pillow PDF/EPUB í Grass for MOBI

Grass for My Pillow ➝ Grass for My Pillow free download ➢ Author Saiichi Maruya – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk First published in Japanese in , the debut novel of the critically acclaimed author of Singular Rebellion is an unusual portrait of a deeply taboo subject in twentieth century Japanese society resista First published in Japanese in , the debut novel of the critically acclaimed author of Singular Rebellion is an unusual portrait of a deeply taboo subject in twentieth century Japanese society resistance to the draft in World War II InShokichi Hamada is a conscientious objector who dodges military service by simply disappearing from society, taking to the country as an itinerant peddler by the name of Sugiura until the end of the Grass for MOBI :Ú war inIn , Hamada works as a clerk at a conservative university, his war resistance a dark secret of the past that present day events force into the light, confronting him with unexpected consequences of his refusal to conform twenty years earlier.


10 thoughts on “Grass for My Pillow

  1. Praj Praj says:

    What has your country offered you What has it done for you What have you accomplished for your country What have you given back to your birth land The notion of patriotism charred in the rebuttals and accusatory insinuations the double edged sword seeped in the ironies of free will conflicting patriotic legitimacy probing the sovereignty of allegiance v s rebellion The devout ready to defend his or her country, does it signify blind devotion without having to question the socio pol What has your country offered you What has it done for you What have you accomplished for your country What have you given back to your birth land The notion of patriotism charred in the rebuttals and accusatory insinuations the double edged sword seeped in the ironies of free will conflicting patriotic legitimacy probing the sovereignty of allegiance v s rebellion The devout ready to defend his or her country, does it signify blind devotion without having to question the socio political dogma The status of Patriotism positioned on shaky grounds during war time Is it criminal to raise scepticism over the transgressions of one s motherland, the land on which freedom must breathe Are we, the honouree of domicile identities become vulnerable pall bearers of humanity clashing into the stoic walls of fragmented patriotism Where do the institutions of human rights survive in this pandemonium the major causality of the war Is being anti war the sign of a deserter Is the rebellion against the nationalistic doctrine of a total entity, an act of cowardice The nationalistic ideologies favourably tipping the war time scales The societal product individual disseminating in it very own organic design the man being the eventual scapegoat of historyScattered like blossoms, down the soldiers fall Had he been a coward Had he been afraid Was he still afraid, even now it was over No, nothing was ever over Saiichi Maruya s sublime, conscientious contention travel beyond the socio political assumption and implications of war , looking deeper into the multifaceted coherent societal constitution shifting in time, grasping the reality of a pre and post war Japanese society , the history of a nation state and the repercussions on its populace flowing in continuity dissolving dual societal disparities The validity of free will v s patriotic obligations enclosed in a foreseeable rebellion negating the virtues of social s The truth of a country s war, the dissension society v s man, the flotsam and jetsam of human rights v s annihilation and the impenetrability of war v s anti war jingoistic ethos during war time tumbling into disconcerting nostalgic restraints of human demeanour and compensated beliefsBut how could one die in a meaningless war How could one go about killing people for no reason Regret was useless Regret was a bottomless swamp, a quicksand To those trapped amid a neurotic wheel of recovery and revaluation, the analysis of the past becomes the worst punishment sentenced by the howls of time Nothing is ever over Death of the past elements slowly unlocks the shackled melancholia of the present, the ghastly anguish of panic unleashed through a single black bordered postcard The quagmire of regret festering in gritty waters of ignominy, self inflicted torment and alienation dragged the 45 yr old registry clerk Shokichi Hamada, the past clinging onto the pervasiveness of his guilt , the feeling of relief a far fetched dream, the puppetry of Hamada s clandestine past manipulating his pugnacious present suffering had become his entire being.A draft resister, Hamada successfully evaded the Japanese military conscription at the height of the Pacific War WWII , the act of resistance and rebellion had bestowed upon Hamada , a life of a vagrant perpetually on run for five long years Oct 1940 Aug 1945 The consequences of the clandestine lifestyle Hamada inhabited in his 20s nagged the resisting conscious two decades later in a society that in spite of adopting anti militaristic regime as a diplomatic post war approach, perceived the act of rejection to enlist during war time, a dishonourable conduct Maruya accentuates the martial atmosphere predominant in Japan under the Meiji constitution and the nationalistic vehemence intensifying the war time attitudes in the Japanese society Contradictory to numerous other esteemed Japanese literary conjectures of Japan being two segregated entities pre and post war , Maruya explicates the continuity of Japanese society as a whole ,flowing from militaristic to anti militaristic era and then later to booming socio economic prosperity , the peripheral objective war long ended but the influential war still operational within the terrains of civilization An analogy glimpsed in Osamu Dazai s erudite literatureHe must never forget that he d broken the most powerful of all the commandments our society imposes, stronger than the commandment not to steal, stronger even than the commandment not to kill He was a man who had gone against the stream. Two worlds, two divergent individualities assimilating in an illusion of a unified existence, the mirror image polarized in dual identities grappling to find a niche in the desperation of resistance Twenty six year old Kenji Sugiura, the vagabond sand artist chose freedom from the authoritative nation state sacrificing his civil liberties The rebellion against the highest societal establishment the decisive farewell instigated the daunting dispute over citizen and its civil duty Kenji Sugiura, the war time alter ego of Shokichi Hamada became a social prisoner of pledged virtues and time The uncertainties of Sugiura contemplating over life and death coagulated within Hamada s aspiration for a tranquil survival The disbelieve in the workings of the Japanese society , the victor being the life long prisoner, the free renegade will of a renegade , the remnant of a man haunted by the remnants of war , of his past ..There is no other path for him There is no way back All he can do, forever and ever, is continue on his perilous voyage, continue his restless journey, and lie down each night with only bamboo grass for a pillow Hamada Sugiura was unable to recover from the illusion of being attuned to the changing world, a much evolved Japan, now feted for anti war ideological propagandas The existence of Shokichi Hamada trembling in self pity and alienation, the guilt of being a draft resister rendering him to a life of vagrancy irrespective to the prosperous social environments Maruya exemplifies philosophical scrutiny of the crude temperament of a society rooted in its history and succeeding social conduct, the problematical dogma inimitable in the virtue of chronic nostalgia dissipating in passage of time, irrevocably pushing the pigeonholed rebel into carrying the sins of the society along with his own sense of guilt The divine clemency pleaded by themere remnants of a man.A country, its middling populace and a few fated ones, the hero of an anti war and a war time scoundrel, evolving from a treacherous past, perceiving a calm and untainted future by rectifying the afflicted sentient of the present , sharing the swaying bamboo grass for a pillow ,the conventional nomad resting the homeless head, a pictogram of transience The doctrine of man and the society intertwined amongst the changing tides of time, embarking on an eternal restless journeyin this fitful slumber bamboograss for my pillowone night of dreamsalone to bind us


  2. Tony Tony says:

    This is the story of Shokichi Hamada, a doctor s son, a 20 year old as The Great Pacific War begins But he will not be a soldier To be a draft resister in 1940 Japan was to be worse than a burglar, worse than a murderer It was a capital offense Yet Hamada somehow survived as an itinerant repairer of clocks and as a sand artist.The story is told in constantly shifting time frames, the war years shuffling with Hamada 20 years after the war, working as an office clerk in a conservative univer This is the story of Shokichi Hamada, a doctor s son, a 20 year old as The Great Pacific War begins But he will not be a soldier To be a draft resister in 1940 Japan was to be worse than a burglar, worse than a murderer It was a capital offense Yet Hamada somehow survived as an itinerant repairer of clocks and as a sand artist.The story is told in constantly shifting time frames, the war years shuffling with Hamada 20 years after the war, working as an office clerk in a conservative university While Hamada never doubts the correctness of his resistance, the shadow of his decision haunts him.The title comes from an old poem Again this fitfulslumber bamboograss for my pillowone night of dreamsalone to bind us.Bamboo, we are told, is a very tenacious weed, prickly stuff It rustles It provides not sleep, but a restless journey And so it is for Hamada.This is Hamada s story, sure, if twenty years apart in the telling Back and forth in that restless journey But then, fairly in the middle, there is a chapter about Nishi His voice In 1966, Nishi and Hamada work side by side Desk jobs Nishi has less talent,demons But in the petty world of office politics, Nishi has a trump card He knows about Hamada s draft dodging, and there is still an audience to hear it Nishi is not likable, not at all But he served when called, and it gnaws at him that Hamada didn t and that he got away with it.Let me interrupt myself here to say that I am no warrior I m not a draft dodger I got a lucky enough number I love reading about soldiers and heroism I honor them Intellectually, however, in the abstract, I abhor War So as I was reading this, it was easy to take Hamada s side He had four reasons a he was opposed to war b he was opposed to this war c he was opposed to armies and d he was opposed to this army So, yes, I understood, agreed, and wished 20 years later the revisionists would let him alone.Yet there in the middle of everything, everything I agreed with, was Nishi One chapter Nishi wasn t a good man and wasn t even a middling soldier But he suffered a Hell that Hamada sidestepped A reader trips is meant to trip over Nishi.My father hated Gene Kelly I m singing in the rainJust singing in the rainWhat a glorious feelin I m happy againYes, that Gene Kelly My father heard, or mis heard, that Gene Kelly had evaded the draft Took measures Whether true or not, it became a hardened fact in my father s heart Fifty years after the War ended, my father still carried that hatred, seethed at the mere mention of his name.Bamboo finds its way inside all our pillows._____ _____ _____ _____ _____This book is part of the Columbia Asian Studies Series, Modern Asian Literature The edition is attractive and the translation is superb


  3. Capsguy Capsguy says:

    How can I review a book so unique, and yet so foreign to me To the core, this is an anti war work written during the Vietnam War It is decades after World War II, and yet the draft resistance of an individual who spent a large period of Japan s involvement in World War II traveling around Japan escaping detection as a draft resister.The plot is non linear, with multiple narrators.The book is pretty bleak, especially during the flashbacks of Japan during World War II and the repercussions for an How can I review a book so unique, and yet so foreign to me To the core, this is an anti war work written during the Vietnam War It is decades after World War II, and yet the draft resistance of an individual who spent a large period of Japan s involvement in World War II traveling around Japan escaping detection as a draft resister.The plot is non linear, with multiple narrators.The book is pretty bleak, especially during the flashbacks of Japan during World War II and the repercussions for an individual who chose to do the unthinkable at the time, a crime worse than murder in Japan, to escape service for the Imperial Army years later Even after the war, with Japan s economic growth and independence, resistance to the pointless war that destroyed Japan was and probably is still frowned upon I don t know what I would do if I was ever drafted into a war that I found pointless Nonetheless, a great take on the perception of the Japanese about such a sensitive topic.Interesting note, author was heavily inspired by James Joyce and even translated Ulysses and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man into Japanese


  4. Stephen Douglas Rowland Stephen Douglas Rowland says:

    I once named Muraya s Rain in the Wind the most boring thing I had ever read, and while this novel is sometimes too dense for its own good, it is still mostly fascinating, and gutsy.


  5. Diane Diane says:

    An amazing but difficult book This is story of a draft resister in Japan in World War II Apparently this was an offense punishable by death and an act that was not ever discussed in Japan and that is still rarely talked about the position of society is that there were no draft resisters in Japan The story is told from the point of view of the same man 20 years later he is married and works as a clerk in the registry office at a University with flashbacks to various events of his life as An amazing but difficult book This is story of a draft resister in Japan in World War II Apparently this was an offense punishable by death and an act that was not ever discussed in Japan and that is still rarely talked about the position of society is that there were no draft resisters in Japan The story is told from the point of view of the same man 20 years later he is married and works as a clerk in the registry office at a University with flashbacks to various events of his life as a draft resister when he roamed about the country fixing radios and clocks and doing sand paintings Not for everyone but I loved it


  6. Yasu Yasu says:

    I ve read this book repeatedly since when I was 13 Each time I read I was absorbed into it in different ways For example, I didn t understand office politics when I was 13 but now I do Coincidentally I m now at the same age as Shokichi in the book and some of the remarks made by him along the story touched me even though my life to reflect is muchmediocre than something extreme of his I found the translation was excellently done In my opinion, this is one of the best modern Japanese n I ve read this book repeatedly since when I was 13 Each time I read I was absorbed into it in different ways For example, I didn t understand office politics when I was 13 but now I do Coincidentally I m now at the same age as Shokichi in the book and some of the remarks made by him along the story touched me even though my life to reflect is muchmediocre than something extreme of his I found the translation was excellently done In my opinion, this is one of the best modern Japanese novels


  7. William Kirkland William Kirkland says:

    Avoidance of conscription in Japan during WWII was the most heinous of crimes worse than rape, or murder Those who were caught were beheaded And yet some did refuse At least some were fictionally imagined to have done so, as in Saiichi Maruya s 1966 novel, Grass for My Pillow ,em Sasamakura , translated by Dennis Keene in 2002.Shokichi Hamada is an assistant Registrar s Clerk at a Japanese university in the 1960s When he receives a death announcement for his lover of twenty years before, Avoidance of conscription in Japan during WWII was the most heinous of crimes worse than rape, or murder Those who were caught were beheaded And yet some did refuse At least some were fictionally imagined to have done so, as in Saiichi Maruya s 1966 novel, Grass for My Pillow ,emSasamakura , translated by Dennis Keene in 2002.Shokichi Hamada is an assistant Registrar s Clerk at a Japanese university in the 1960s When he receives a death announcement for his lover of twenty years before, memory begins to surface Their time together had been during four war years he had spent moving from small town to small town in Japan, avoiding the authorities and certain conscription.He was quite convinced that what was euphemistically referred to as The China Incident was merely the prosecution of open war under a false name, and that the Japanese army was a totally corrupt and terrifying institution For this reason he d decided he could not ally himself with that institution, preferring to sacrifice his liberty as a citizen for the sake of his freedom as a human being A thoughtful young man, he had classified his reasons for refusing conscription One opposition to war in general,Two opposition to this particular war,Three opposition to armies in general,Four opposition to this particular army.Nor was he alone in his opposition Others talked about how they might avoid the army, and apparently in enough numbers that the army had to respond The idea of cutting off your right index finger so you couldn t pull a trigger had the disadvantage of maiming you for life, and the authorities had also gotten around this trick recently by sticking you into some branch of the service other than the infantry One method was to wet your bed every night in the barracks, but the M.P.s would soon be onto you The traditional method was to drink soy sauce just before the physical, as it gave you a high temperature, but there was a considerable danger that you might do yourself real harm Pretending you were insane was another possibility In alternating chapters, we learn of his four years on the run and of his current life, competing for advancement in the university while his colleagues and supervisors, aware of his non service in the war, and sharing in the 1960s change of mood from war shame to national pride, mock him for cowardliness and lack of patriotism.It would seem unlikely that a conscription aged young man could escape notice for four years in a highly militarized and emperor obedient nation But taking up a life of vagrancy, dressed shabbily and road worn, unshaven and hair uncut, he does not look like potential soldier material He learns to repair clocks and radios he does sand paintings for local festivals He ekes out a living, learning from other vagrants and cast offs until he meets a young woman, Akiko, who shares his adventurous spirit and easy sexuality, even in 1940s Japan Together they travel from one obscure fishing village to another, with nothing but grass for a pillow Mysterious men seem to be tracking him A casual conversation turns to battleships and armaments what can it mean What may have been a policeman turns out to be a recruiter for the mines a tempting possibility where outcasts, drifters and army refusers can hide away For a time the two cohabitate with her mother, he doing gardening and staying out of sight.Along the way, we get quick views into the condition of war time Japan, as black tea leaves are mixed with rice to provide meals, as well as the rising nationalism in the 60s acquaintances are circulating right wing magazines denying war crimes and arguing the necessity of Japanese acquisition of an H bomb.Maruya himself was of the generation which fought in the war He was drafted while still in high school though the war ended before he was sent to an active unit.For the complete review see


  8. Bill Johnston Bill Johnston says:

    I ll have to be the dissenting opinion here I couldn t finish the book I only got one fifth of the way through it.I found the book description intriguing, and wanted to read about the life of a draft dodger decades later and the repercussions he faced But apparently not this one He obsesses over small details which slows the plot to a crawl, and he s unlikable as well.I got as far as the scene where the expected tension in the novel is destroyed It turns out his coworkers all know about his I ll have to be the dissenting opinion here I couldn t finish the book I only got one fifth of the way through it.I found the book description intriguing, and wanted to read about the life of a draft dodger decades later and the repercussions he faced But apparently not this one He obsesses over small details which slows the plot to a crawl, and he s unlikable as well.I got as far as the scene where the expected tension in the novel is destroyed It turns out his coworkers all know about his past, so there s no dark secret he s fighting to keep hidden.What turns me off about the main character isn t his endlessly replaying the past, or his failing to try to stop the thief older and out of shape, I doubt he could have if he tried , or his passivity It s his behavior towards his wife In a sex sceneexplicit than I m used to in Japanese novels not a bad thing , he s unable to perform for his younger, frustrated wife, and rather than stimulate her he chooses to just lie on his back and listen as she masturbates herself to sleep


  9. Taylor Lee Taylor Lee says:

    A fascinating fictional account of Japanese draft resistance during the Pacific War of the early 1940s As before, Maruya s hero is the individual at odds with the collective Grass for My Pillow, the aptly titled 1966 novel, investigates the lifelong implications of youthful rebellion against wartime injustice, as, like waves made upon entering a pool of water, they reverberate through the years of this character s life, coming to saturate his thoughts and the environment in which, one quarter A fascinating fictional account of Japanese draft resistance during the Pacific War of the early 1940s As before, Maruya s hero is the individual at odds with the collective Grass for My Pillow, the aptly titled 1966 novel, investigates the lifelong implications of youthful rebellion against wartime injustice, as, like waves made upon entering a pool of water, they reverberate through the years of this character s life, coming to saturate his thoughts and the environment in which, one quarter of a century into the future, he finds himself The novel s structure is playful and a source for the tale s engrossing nature Maruya s hand, here, as it has done in other works and seems wont to do, flexes with light comic artistry, though on the whole the narrative is colored sombre and one is left leaving its space observing threads of bleak sadness at the story s edges trailing into the wind


  10. Samuel Hawley Samuel Hawley says:

    A quiet, meditative novel about a Japanese man, Hamada, who dodges the draft during the war a crime of the worst sort and travels around the country under an assumed name Frequent back and forth time shifts, from the present 1960s, when the book was written and back to the war, with wartime chronology all mixed up, but I didn t find it too confusing Author Saiichi Maruya explores the delayed repercussions that Hamada s youthful act of rebellion has on him twenty years later, when he is a m A quiet, meditative novel about a Japanese man, Hamada, who dodges the draft during the war a crime of the worst sort and travels around the country under an assumed name Frequent back and forth time shifts, from the present 1960s, when the book was written and back to the war, with wartime chronology all mixed up, but I didn t find it too confusing Author Saiichi Maruya explores the delayed repercussions that Hamada s youthful act of rebellion has on him twenty years later, when he is a middle aged office worker at a conservative Japanese university The past cannot stay hidden, and for Hamada, it doesn t


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