The Tallgrass Prairie Reader Kindle ´ The Tallgrass

The Tallgrass Prairie Reader Kindle ´ The Tallgrass


10 thoughts on “The Tallgrass Prairie Reader

  1. Gary Brecht Gary Brecht says:

    After reading this, I believe I have officially become a Prairie Nerd I truthfully enjoyed reading excerpts of prairie literature written by those who lived on or near the vanishing savanna Outstanding authors like Thoreau, Washington Irving, Aldo Leopold, and others are represented here A number of Native American writers and lesser known scribes contribute to reconstructing for their readers the beauty and value of the land we have sacrificed to modern agriculture.One might ask, wouldn t After reading this, I believe I have officially become a Prairie Nerd I truthfully enjoyed reading excerpts of prairie literature written by those who lived on or near the vanishing savanna Outstanding authors like Thoreau, Washington Irving, Aldo Leopold, and others are represented here A number of Native American writers and lesser known scribes contribute to reconstructing for their readers the beauty and value of the land we have sacrificed to modern agriculture.One might ask, wouldn t an anthology of works focused entirely on one subject, especially one so monotonous as America s vast plains, be too repetitious to sustain a reader s interest Well, not if this collection of works contains references to the plants specific to the prairie, and their unique characteristics not if descriptions and behavior of the animals and insects typical of this province are given not if weather, climatic, and celestial features of our grasslands are observed All of these are contained in this accessible compilation Pick it up and learn about what we have lost and how we might retrieve it


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The Tallgrass Prairie Reader ➽ [Reading] ➿ The Tallgrass Prairie Reader By John T. Price ➲ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk The tallgrass prairie of the early s, a beautiful and seemingly endless landscape of wildflowers and grasses, is now a tiny remnant of its former expanse As a literary landscape, with much of the Amer The tallgrass prairie of the early s, a beautiful and seemingly endless landscape of wildflowers and grasses, is now a tiny remnant of its former expanse As a literary landscape, with much of the American environmental imagination focused on a mainstream notion of spectacular examples of wild beauty, tallgrass is even neglected Prairie author and advocate John T Price wondered what it would take to restore tallgrass prairie to its rightful place at the center of our collective identity The answer to that question is hisTallgrass Prairie Reader, a first of its The Tallgrass ePUB Ò kind collection of literature from and about the tallgrass bioregion Focusing on autobiographical nonfiction in a wide variety of forms, voices, and approaches including adventure narrative, spiritual reflection, childhood memoir, Native American perspectives, literary natural history, humor, travel writing and reportage he honors the ecological diversity of tallgrass itself and provides a range of models for nature writers and students The chronological arrangement allows readers to experience tallgrass through the eyes and imaginations of forty two authors from the nineteenth to the twenty first centuries Writings by very early explorers are followed by works of nineteenth century authors that reflect the fear, awe, reverence, and thrill of adventure rampant at the time After , following the destruction of the majority of tallgrass, much of the writing became nostalgic, elegiac, and mythic A new environmental consciousness asserted itself midcentury, as personal responses to tallgrass were increasingly influenced by larger ecological perspectives Preservation and restoration informed by hard science emerged as major themes Early twenty first century writings demonstrate an awareness of tallgrass environmental history and the need for citizens, including writers, to remember and to help save our once magnificent prairies.

    Kindle Welcome to the Kindle ereader store about the tallgrass bioregion Focusing on autobiographical nonfiction in a wide variety of forms, voices, and approaches including adventure narrative, spiritual reflection, childhood memoir, Native American perspectives, literary natural history, humor, travel writing and reportage he honors the ecological diversity of tallgrass itself and provides a range of models for nature writers and students The chronological arrangement allows readers to experience tallgrass through the eyes and imaginations of forty two authors from the nineteenth to the twenty first centuries Writings by very early explorers are followed by works of nineteenth century authors that reflect the fear, awe, reverence, and thrill of adventure rampant at the time After , following the destruction of the majority of tallgrass, much of the writing became nostalgic, elegiac, and mythic A new environmental consciousness asserted itself midcentury, as personal responses to tallgrass were increasingly influenced by larger ecological perspectives Preservation and restoration informed by hard science emerged as major themes Early twenty first century writings demonstrate an awareness of tallgrass environmental history and the need for citizens, including writers, to remember and to help save our once magnificent prairies."/>
  • Paperback
  • 334 pages
  • The Tallgrass Prairie Reader
  • John T. Price
  • 27 February 2017
  • 1609382463

About the Author: John T. Price

Born in Fort Dodge, Iowa, in , he attended the University of Iowa, where he earned his BA in Religion, MFA in Nonfiction Writing and PhD in English A recipient of a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and other recognitions, his nonfiction writing about nature, family, and spirit has appeared in many journals, magazines, newspapers, and anthologies including Orion, The Christian Science Monitor, Creative Nonfiction, Isotope, and Best Spiritual Writing He is a Professor of English at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where he teaches nonfiction writing,and The Tallgrass ePUB Ò a fellow at the Black Earth Institute He lives with his wife Stephanie and three sons in the Loess Hills of western Iowa.