The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead

The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead

The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead [PDF / Epub] ★ The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead By Kathleen Thompson – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk The clash of armies in the American Civil War left hundreds of thousands of men dead, wounded, or permanently damaged Skirmishes and battles could result in casualty numbers as low as one or two and a The clash of armies in the American Civil of Battle: ePUB ☆ War left hundreds of thousands of men dead, wounded, or permanently damaged Skirmishes and battles could result in casualty numbers as low as one or two and as high as tens of thousands The carnage of the battlefield left a lasting impression on those who experienced or viewed it, but in most cases the armies quickly moved on to meet again at another time and place When the dust settled and the living armies moved on, what happened to the dead left The Aftermath MOBI :Ú behind Unlike battle narratives, The Aftermath of Battle The Burial of the Civil War Dead picks up the story as the battle ends The burial of the dead was an overwhelming experience for the armies or communities forced to clean up after the destruction of battle In the short term action, bodies were hastily buried to avoid the stench and the horrific health concerns of massive death in the long term, families struggled to reclaim loved ones and properly reinter them in established cemeteriesVisitors to a battlefield often wonder what happened Aftermath of Battle: eBook ´ to the dead once the battle was over In this easy to read overview that will complement any Civil War library, author Meg Thompson provides a look at the aftermath of battle and the process of burying the Civil War deadThe Aftermath of Battle is part of the Emerging Civil War Series offering compelling, easy to read overviews of some of the Civil War s most important stories The masterful storytelling is richly enhanced with hundreds of photos and illustrations.


About the Author: Kathleen Thompson

Is a well known author, some of his of Battle: ePUB ☆ books are a fascination for readers like in the The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead book, this is one of the most wanted Kathleen Thompson author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Aftermath of Battle: The Burial of the Civil War Dead

  1. Sarah Bierle Sarah Bierle says:

    If you read lots of Civil War books or visit battlefields, you need to read this book With respect and good historical knowledge, the author thoroughly answers the challenging question What did they do with all the bodies This is an informative, fast paced non fiction book detailing the Civil War s effects on the American attitude toward mourning and death Though telling historical truth, the text is not filled with overly gruesome imagery Masterfully, it covers a wide range of topics relat If you read lots of Civil War books or visit battlefields, you need to read this book With respect and good historical knowledge, the author thoroughly answers the challenging question What did they do with all the bodies This is an informative, fast paced non fiction book detailing the Civil War s effects on the American attitude toward mourning and death Though telling historical truth, the text is not filled with overly gruesome imagery Masterfully, it covers a wide range of topics relating to the tragic side of the Civil War, including battlefield burials, aftermath photography, establishment of national cemeteries, the history of the bugle call Taps , prisoners, the sinking of the Hunley, and memorializing Each chapter addresses a different topic within the framework of the overall subject Many of the chapters highlight a story of interest, which personally kept my attention and helped me relate to the solemn subject better Another positive feature of the book is travel tips for battlefields and cemeteries in case the readers wish to visit a specific location mentioned in the text The Aftermath of Battle covers a solemn subject in a respectful way It s a book that every Civil War history buff needs on their shelf


  2. robin friedman robin friedman says:

    Note Meg Groeling is the author of this book rather than Kathleen Thompson who is listed on Goodreads.The Emerging Civil War Series aims to provide readers with a basic understanding of some of the most important issues and battles of the American Civil War The books in the series are short, accessibly written, and amply illustrated The books are geared to a non specialist audience of readers who may not have extensive knowledge of the Civil War but who want to learn In learning any subject, Note Meg Groeling is the author of this book rather than Kathleen Thompson who is listed on Goodreads.The Emerging Civil War Series aims to provide readers with a basic understanding of some of the most important issues and battles of the American Civil War The books in the series are short, accessibly written, and amply illustrated The books are geared to a non specialist audience of readers who may not have extensive knowledge of the Civil War but who want to learn In learning any subject, the best course is to start from where you are and go forward Some of the books in this series, such as the book I am reviewing here, offers a broad look at an issue that extends through the Civil War and beyond Thus, this book might be particularly useful to high school students.This recent book in the series, The Aftermath of Battle the Burial of the Civil War Dead 2015 tells the story of the men who stayed behind those who died in the War from conflict or disease and how their remains were treated There is a growing body of study on this subject, both as a whole and for specific battles, but this little book offers an overview Meg Groeling, the author of the study, is a long time student of the Civil War She taught mathematics at the primary and middle school level for many years before discovering her passion for history Her work on this book shows good research and thought about her subject A unique part of Civil War historiography, including this book, is that people from varied backgrounds develop a strong interest in the subject and are able to make valuable contributions to its study through books and other ways Few other areas of study offer such an extensive opportunity to nonspecialists.With its broad subject, this book offers a wide ranging treatment It proceeds in a chronological manner throughout the war beginning with the first recorded fatality in May, 1861 and concluding in August, 1956, with the death of the last surviving Civil War veteran, Many of the brief individual chapters offer succinct summaries of individual battles and of the problems posed by each in caring for the wounded and in burying the dead The battles covered include Shiloh, Antietam, Stones River, Gettysburg, Vicksburg, the Wilderness, Franklin, andThe book considers naval encounters as well, particularly the fate of the early Confederate submarine, the Hunley The book discusses the notorious Confederate prison of Andersonville and the lesser known Union prison of Elmira Besides the battles and prisons, the book devotes attention to Civil War cemeteries and to pioneers in the treatment of the wounded and dead The reader will learn about Jonathan Letterman, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac, and his heroic efforts in improving the care of the wounded, Clara Barton, Helen Gilson, and other caregivers The book explores photography and its impact in bringing the extent of Civil War deaths home to the general population It covers subjects as different as the origin of Taps and the embalming of dead bodies.In its short scope, the book offers a good deal of information about the Civil War, some of which is likely to be new even to long time students Groeling provides information about Civil War sites, familiar and unfamiliar, together with encouragement for those who may be considering a visit The book is moving in its portrayal of violence and death and in the causes for which men heroically gave their lives Groeling concludes by reminding the reader that those who fought deserve to be remembered Confederate or Union, officer or enlisted, identified or still unknown We remember they were ordinary people just like us, trying their best to do their duty under extraordinary circumstances The book offers a short, annotated bibliography for those moved to do additional reading Footnotes and references are available online rather than in the text This book amply fulfills the purpose of the Emerging Civil War Series by offering a good overview of the human costs of the Civil War and by encouraging readers to explore further Savas Beatie, the publisher, kindly sent me a review copy of this book.Robin Friedman


  3. Matthew Bartlett Matthew Bartlett says:

    One of the most cited numbers of the American Civil War is the amount of casualties which occurred in the entirety of the conflict While the number of casualties throughout the war is important, one ofunanswered questions in people s minds are what happened to all of the bodies after the numerous battles While there are some answers to those questions, there are many opportunities to understand the process and location of some of the Civil War dead In The Aftermath of Battle, Meg Groe One of the most cited numbers of the American Civil War is the amount of casualties which occurred in the entirety of the conflict While the number of casualties throughout the war is important, one ofunanswered questions in people s minds are what happened to all of the bodies after the numerous battles While there are some answers to those questions, there are many opportunities to understand the process and location of some of the Civil War dead In The Aftermath of Battle, Meg Groeling helps us to understand the sometimes complicated process which took place in order to bury the soldiers who sacrificed everything for their country Meg Groeling is one of the many contributing writers to the Emerging Civil War blog Along with being a writer, she is also a teacher and a curriculum developer since 1987 She has taught at both elementary and middle school levels for over thirty years and she graduated from California State University in Long Beach with a B.A in Liberal Studies She is also currently a master s candidate at American Public University majoring in Military History with a Civil War specialization The Aftermath of Battle is part of the ever growing Emerging Civil War Series published by Savas Beatie In The Aftermath of Battle, not only does Groeling discuss the process of the burial of the dead, but the creation of some of the most famous graveyards at Civil War battlefields While certain battlefields, such as Gettysburg and Antietam, have well documented burials of the dead, there are many other cases of questions which come up in Civil War discussion One of the highlights of the book for myself was the chapter on the burial of the horses Some of the images in this chapter were both strange and heartbreaking One in particular was an Alexander Gardner photograph of a horse which looks to be resting, but is actually one of the many dead on the Antietam battlefield It was also interesting to discover how some of the horse s remains were dealt with after the battle one of the many ways was to burn the carcass since they were too large to move Another chapter was about moving the bodies from the battlefield to home bringing up certain methods such as embalming and ice coffins The amount of information within the pages of this book handling the eerie subject matter are handled with a great amount of grace that while this information may make some queasy, the writing tends to lessen it This book, like all others in the Emerging Civil War Series, is also filled with appendices from other contributors to the Emerging Civil War Blog The short articles written by other contributors only add to the great narrative which Groeling has written here I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in the American Civil War, especially when questions rise about how they handled the Civil War dead The book is filled with maps and images which aid in the reading of the work and the subject, though morbid to some, is handled with the greatest professionalism and ease that anyone can find this book interesting This is one of the many works which offered something different and exciting to offer the realm of Civil War writing Matthew Bartlett Gettysburg Chronicle


  4. Roger King Roger King says:

    Gettysburg PA, July 4, 1863 Heavy rain Both armies left town, heading south Thousands of dead men, horses, and mules remained in deep mud, a mile long swath along the western slope of Cemetery Ridge What do you do Apparently not much Men were buried in shallow graves at or near where they died horsed burned loose arms, legs, feet, hands were burned The debris of battle was still evident on November 19 when President Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address No one was prepared for the scale Gettysburg PA, July 4, 1863 Heavy rain Both armies left town, heading south Thousands of dead men, horses, and mules remained in deep mud, a mile long swath along the western slope of Cemetery Ridge What do you do Apparently not much Men were buried in shallow graves at or near where they died horsed burned loose arms, legs, feet, hands were burned The debris of battle was still evident on November 19 when President Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address No one was prepared for the scale of death and destruction experienced in the Civil War The Aftermath of Battle The Burial of the Civil War Dead is light on the actual logistics of cleaning up the mess, but very strong on the changes to military operations, veterans affairs, and cemeteries a moving testament to the few heroes that fought through the military and political bureaucracies After the generals proved unprepared for the slaughter, Dr Jonathan Letterman rapidly organized effective medical operations across all fronts Clara Barton was instrumental in searching for unknown or missing war dead, reburying and identifying 33,000 bodies General Montgomery Meigs turned the family mansion of General Lee s wife into Arlington Cemetery Matthew Brady and his photographers quickly brought the horrors of the battlefield to the public using mobile darkrooms.The Wilderness was the worst battlefield, in a second growth forest with dense undergrowth No one could see what they were shooting at the dead and wounded could not be found and buried, left where they fell and forest fires covered everything up According to one Confederate soldier,They told us he had been shot thru the arm, and had been sent to the rear, tho his wound was severe, they thought it was not serious, but that was the last that was ever know about Julius Root, whether he died from the loss of blood, or was caught in the forest fires that were raging about that time, and burned to death, or was taken prisoner by the enemy, and perished in some southern prison, will perhaps never be known As the Sea does not give up its dead, so war does not yield its victums, and he sleeps, perhaps, in some quiet nameless graveknown only to Him who notes even the sparrow s fall, and who will summon him forth in that last great day


  5. Craig Anderson Craig Anderson says:

    The Aftermath of Battle The burial of the Civil War DeadBy Meg GroelingSavas Beatie192 pages As researchers, historians, hobbyists and enthusiast of the War Between the States it is rare that a journal, study or book that comes along that has an impact on what we know and how we view this time in history I personally have studied the war for most of my life, the stories, the movements, the battlefields and yes the suffering that went along with it What this book brought to the table was a cl The Aftermath of Battle The burial of the Civil War DeadBy Meg GroelingSavas Beatie192 pages As researchers, historians, hobbyists and enthusiast of the War Between the States it is rare that a journal, study or book that comes along that has an impact on what we know and how we view this time in history I personally have studied the war for most of my life, the stories, the movements, the battlefields and yes the suffering that went along with it What this book brought to the table was a clear vivid tale of the suffering and aftermath and as a focus of this tragic part, the stories hit home like nothing I have read in a long time As students we understood the hardships and we have read about them However, until you read page after page that does not leave the subject to follow another route the impact becomes greater than one may expect Meg Groeling did a wonderful job bringing this aspect to life and followed the line in which she started keeping us in the moments For me in was a very powerful read, and one that I had to read twice before I was actually able to offer a review for this book as the first time though my thoughts were running so fast that I had to take a moment to comprehend the impact and put it to words The only negative that I have about this book is the font for the chapters If there had not been a title page that clearly states what the chapter names are, I still would not know what it was titled I understand the concept, but it missed its mark and confused the issue Luckily it took nothing away from the main read of the book This book was and is worth your time several sittings actually Craig AndersonOur History Project, Inc


  6. Dennis Berry Dennis Berry says:

    Interesting but dry


  7. Diane Depew Diane Depew says:

    Not what I expected It doesn t go into great detail regarding the establishment of the National Cemetery system and the efforts by the quartermaster department to reclaim the dead For instance, there was no mention of the U.S.C.T.s after the war for burial details The book readslike a random series of magazine articles on a handful of battles and the treatment of dead from that battle what happened to all the dead horses and mules dead in two POW camps discrepancies in ascertaining t Not what I expected It doesn t go into great detail regarding the establishment of the National Cemetery system and the efforts by the quartermaster department to reclaim the dead For instance, there was no mention of the U.S.C.T.s after the war for burial details The book readslike a random series of magazine articles on a handful of battles and the treatment of dead from that battle what happened to all the dead horses and mules dead in two POW camps discrepancies in ascertaining the number of Civil War dead, etc


  8. Sophie Lynne Sophie Lynne says:

    Not enough meat read like a travel guide


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