Rome's Lost Son eBook è Rome's Lost PDF/EPUB ²

Rome's Lost Son eBook è Rome's Lost PDF/EPUB ²



10 thoughts on “Rome's Lost Son

  1. Mr. Matt Mr. Matt says:

    This book marks a turning point Vespasian has learned a lesson and taken it to heart Imperial politics are a nasty winner takes all game that you either play for keeps or don t play at all After years of toiling for the good of the Empire Vespasian has had enough He will no longer be a pawn He is in it to win it I liked this book It marked a real change from the prior books Vespasian is a new man For this point forward the well meaning Senator is noHe begins plotting and maneuv This book marks a turning point Vespasian has learned a lesson and taken it to heart Imperial politics are a nasty winner takes all game that you either play for keeps or don t play at all After years of toiling for the good of the Empire Vespasian has had enough He will no longer be a pawn He is in it to win it I liked this book It marked a real change from the prior books Vespasian is a new man For this point forward the well meaning Senator is noHe begins plotting and maneuvering Switching allegiances from Narcissus and the Emperor to the duo of Pallas and Agrippa and,importantly, Agrippa s son, Nero Yes, he realizes that Nero will be a train wreck of an Emperor a Caligula with a hint of restraint but Vespasian doesn t care The ultimate aim of all this plotting is to destabilize the Empire and bring the Julio Claudian line to an end In the ensuing vacuum an ambitious man of ability with money and,importantly, legions at his back can shape his own destiny.Talk about character development I can t wait for the next book Vespasian and Nero There s a match made in heaven Of course, I know how it ends It is historical fiction after all Still, it ll be a fun read.IV stars out of V


  2. Speesh Speesh says:

    There are two things about novels dealing with Roman times at the height of the Empire Did all the politicking that all the Roman writers I ve read write about, actually go on Or is it just a device that has become a given in Hist Fic circles Or are we applying a 21st Century view on first century politics It s politics, it goes on now, it must have been the same back then My thoughts as well, would be that a book like this really could cross over tomodern genres, and appeal to those There are two things about novels dealing with Roman times at the height of the Empire Did all the politicking that all the Roman writers I ve read write about, actually go on Or is it just a device that has become a given in Hist Fic circles Or are we applying a 21st Century view on first century politics It s politics, it goes on now, it must have been the same back then My thoughts as well, would be that a book like this really could cross over tomodern genres, and appeal to those who likedHouse of Cards,for example And, in Roman times thought this could cover all periods a long time ago were there ever any dull days Where nothing of note, no poisonings, no huge banquets, no Emperors shagging their half brothers in public Days where it rained all day and they sat inside in front of the fire and watched a fresco You know what I m saying Of course, that sort of thing wouldn t make a good book, let alone a series of seven, as Robert F is up to now Maybe, as he points out at the end, saying that this book is speculative, covering at least in part, a period undocumented in Vespasian s life, maybe the reason there is nothing, is because he didn t do anythingIdes of March AD 51 Got up, messed about, went to bed The first part, third or so, is concerned with goings on in Rome Setting out the problems and the reasoning for why the rest of the book deals with what it does There are perhaps one or two too many ifs and buts and maybes and names ending in us to keep total track of, but apart from glazing over a couple of times, I can see why it s there Some authors, sensibly, stay at a distance from all the politicking Ben Kane, Anthony Riches I d venture they seeminterested in the consequences of the machinations, than the machinations themselves I hope authors aren t including all this kind of thing because it appears to add a certain gravitas to their work Certainly, given that we know where Vespasian ended up, he had two choices go along with all this, play the great game, or remove himself from it all From reading about the period after this book details, from Douglas Jackson for example, that he seems to have done a little of both.All that aside, there s a lot to like about this, once it moves away from the plate of spaghetti that is Roman politics in Historical Fiction at least of the time The writing is as ever, absolutely first rate You re allowed in immediately, and you know, pretty much where you ve got Vespasian Thinking back over the previous books, you can see what a superb job Robert F has done in slowly developing the Vespasian character to be where he is now He is also making some points about the free for all that was the beginnings of Christianity and Paul us in particular, hijacking and deifying of it for his own ends If I were to go out on a limb, and put words in RF s mouth, I d say he wasn t a great fan of Christianity I m not either, I d hasten to add, but then, I m not a great fan of any religion and especially not one created and twisted away from its original message.It didn t quite take me by the spatula and swing me round by the denarii like, for example, Rome s Fallen Eagle, but it is a very strong volume in the overall series And, judging by the end of this one, the next book is going to be a tense affair, as all is ready for Nero to take centre stage If it s anything like the one dealing with Caligula, we re going to need a strong stomach, nerves of steel and hope the story goes off with Vespasian rather than staying in Rome.All my reviews Speesh ReadsSpeesh Reads Facebook Page


  3. lauren lauren says:

    I don t see why these novels are so popular.I read this book a few months ago since this is a period in the imperial court I m particularly interested in, and it caught my eye This is the kind of historical fiction that pisses me off just a little bit The writing style s average, not especially engaging, but then again you don t expect the writing to be the focus of historical fiction But it s the degree of exaggeration and implausibility which gets on my nerves The plotline of Vespasian bei I don t see why these novels are so popular.I read this book a few months ago since this is a period in the imperial court I m particularly interested in, and it caught my eye This is the kind of historical fiction that pisses me off just a little bit The writing style s average, not especially engaging, but then again you don t expect the writing to be the focus of historical fiction But it s the degree of exaggeration and implausibility which gets on my nerves The plotline of Vespasian being thrown into jail was silly and hard to believe, and didn t fit with the rest of the book And the final scene is one which will be burned into my mind for a long time, and for no good reason Why do some authors think that gratuitous sexual violence and scenes of debauchery are a shortcut to good writing Don t get me wrong, I know that 100% historical accuracy isn t essential to historical fiction Far from it A good author knows when to inject imagination into a story and how to fill in gaps in the record in a way which is both inventive and believable I don t take issue with the distortion of historical fact, but I do take issue with needless twisted sensationalism used to shock I don t know, maybe I m letting my own personal investment in the figures of this period affect my judgement Probably As a novel, it s certainly a fun ride, if nothing too original, and there were aspects of it I did like But I wish that mainstream Roman historical fiction was less cardboard cut out depravity and heartlessness


  4. Paul Bennett Paul Bennett says:

    BLURBRome, AD 51 Vespasian brings Rome s greatest enemy before the Emperor After eight years of resistance, the British warrior Caratacus has been caught But even Vespasian s victory cannot remove the newly made consul from Roman politics Agrippina, Emperor Claudius s wife, pardons Caratacus Claudius is a drunken fool and Narcissus and Pallas, his freedmen, are battling for control of his throne Separately, they decide to send Vespasian East to Armenia to defend Rome s interests But there BLURBRome, AD 51 Vespasian brings Rome s greatest enemy before the Emperor After eight years of resistance, the British warrior Caratacus has been caught But even Vespasian s victory cannot remove the newly made consul from Roman politics Agrippina, Emperor Claudius s wife, pardons Caratacus Claudius is a drunken fool and Narcissus and Pallas, his freedmen, are battling for control of his throne Separately, they decide to send Vespasian East to Armenia to defend Rome s interests But there isat stake than protecting a client kingdom Rumors abound that Agrippina is involved in a plot to destabilise the East Vespasian must find a way to serve two masters Narcissus is determined to ruin Agrippina, Pallas to save her Meanwhile, the East is in turmoil A new Jewish cult is flourishing and its adherents refuse to swear loyalty to the Emperor In Armenia, Vespasian is captured Immured in the oldest city on earth, how can he escape And is a Rome ruled by a woman who despises Vespasian any safer than a prison cell REVIEWA gap in the historical record of Vespasian a veritable open canvas for the author, a proving ground for a fertile imagination Once again I was awed by the character building, and the level of political intrigue involved in this brilliant look at Vespasian and the way he is playing the long game His birth prophecy and a sacrificial liver set him on a course to the throne, but a lot has to happen first And a lot does happen in this intricate, page turning tale Claudius is on the way outNero is next in line to continue the Julio Claudian tendency to excess Rome s Lost Son, as one would expect given the previous books in the series, is a thrilling tale that keeps the reader coming back for5


  5. Finn Finn says:

    In Rome s Lost Son, we again travel across the empire This book is full of action, intrigue and warfare all set in a complex contact which Fabbri encapsulates with finesse.This is an excellent series The pace is spot on, the characters both Vespasian himself and the supporting ones are rich and excellently depicted, and the humour throughout makes these a joy to read Historical accuracy is important to me in historical fiction novels, and Fabbri does not disappoint here It is clear he h In Rome s Lost Son, we again travel across the empire This book is full of action, intrigue and warfare all set in a complex contact which Fabbri encapsulates with finesse.This is an excellent series The pace is spot on, the characters both Vespasian himself and the supporting ones are rich and excellently depicted, and the humour throughout makes these a joy to read Historical accuracy is important to me in historical fiction novels, and Fabbri does not disappoint here It is clear he has meticulously researched the period, ensuring events are portrayed with veracity and that daily life is represented with an authentic feel


  6. Kate Kate says:

    What a fabulous series this is and Rome s Lost Son, the sixth, is every bit as good as the best It has some stand out scenes, notably in Parthia and in Rome at the novel s outstanding conclusion, which I will remember for a long time.


  7. Helen Mccabe Helen Mccabe says:

    This is the 6th book in the series and I am determined to read them all until Vespasian becomes Emperor of Rome Throughout the series, the reader comes to know Vespasian better I have liked the man all along, but I am not too happy in this novel with his total embroilment in the political scene in the Capitol I can see why he needs to meddle and examine, because he has pushed himself to discover and believe his mother s secret auguries about his future He is not quite sure that some day he m This is the 6th book in the series and I am determined to read them all until Vespasian becomes Emperor of Rome Throughout the series, the reader comes to know Vespasian better I have liked the man all along, but I am not too happy in this novel with his total embroilment in the political scene in the Capitol I can see why he needs to meddle and examine, because he has pushed himself to discover and believe his mother s secret auguries about his future He is not quite sure that some day he might be Emperor, so all his machinations are part of trying to stay alive especially when the Golden Boy Nero takes the throne Will Nero be the last member of the Julian ruling family or will there be others to follow Vespasian is determined to be there when Nero meets his fate, so he plots, but never fawns with the rest He is no sychophant He is a schemer, but, internally, the real man the reader has met and loved, still exists He is a hardened soldier, and does not bother about small losses of life or dreadful crucifixions He has seen too much death He feels pity for some victims and has scant regard for some He is still an unhappy husband and a loving father He saves his affections for his mistress, the faithful Caenis He is interested in the rise of the early Christians, but sees the Apostle Paulus as a threat to his own god, Mars, who has kept him safe throughout times of anguish that happen to him for long periods in this novel It is not an easy book to read with its cruelties and incarcerations Human life means very little to the ruling classes in Rome They face the idea of their death with fear, but many accept it as a fact of life and receive it with honour I am not quite sure if I like Vespasian as much as I did, but bits of his former nature do appear when for example he contemplates his destiny watching the stars in the desert or he struggles wildly to saves his son Titus from being poisoned I shall not spoil this book for you telling you what has happened, but you can rely on Fabbri, the author, to put at a reader s disposal the difficulties of a man like Vespasian, who has no chance of taking the throne as his family is not noble enough, but who believes that he is destined for it and if it is ever offered, then he will rise to the occasion This novel is worth reading and pondering about the life that the Roman nobility lived At the end, Fabbri explains his sources, whether taken from Tacitus and other classical authors, but avers that when he, himself, strays, this is part of his own imagination which he feels could be true I have not given it 5 because Vespasian is changed, but I am looking forward to the man he inevitably will become


  8. Kris Van Laer Kris Van Laer says:

    Another winner in the series, Vespasianandslides away into the plotting and intrigues of the Roman leaders Though as author claims this part about Vespasian is almost fully fictional, the story fits in perfectly into the series ending with the start of a new reign, emperor Nero which we all know will getandhorrible.


  9. Martin Martin says:

    This is childhood escapism at its best The sixth instalment just continues the story of Vespasian and number 7 is next


  10. Terry Sampson Terry Sampson says:

    Wow Such attention to details.Enjoyable story The details and the breadth of the story is amazing I needs map and a timeline to keep track Thanks for this.


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Rome's Lost Son [Read] ➱ Rome's Lost Son Author Robert Fabbri – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk The sixth installment in Robert Fabbri s epic Vespasian seriesRome, AD Vespasian brings Rome s greatest enemy before the Emperor After eight years of resistance, the British warrior Caratacus has bee The sixth installment in Robert Fabbri s epic Vespasian seriesRome, ADVespasian brings Rome s greatest enemy before the Emperor After eight years of resistance, the British warrior Caratacus has been caught But even Vespasian s victory cannot remove the newly made consul from Roman politics Agrippina, Emperor Claudius s wife, pardons Caratacus Claudius is a drunken fool and Narcissus and Pallas, his freedmen, are battling for control of his throne Separately, they decide to send Vespasian East to Armenia to defend Rome s interests But there is at stake than protecting a client kingdom Rumors abound that Agrippina Rome's Lost PDF/EPUB ² is involved in a plot to destabilise the East Vespasian must find a way to serve two masters Narcissus is determined to ruin Agrippina, Pallas to save her Meanwhile, the East is in turmoil A new Jewish cult is flourishing and its adherents refuse to swear loyalty to the Emperor In Armenia, Vespasian is captured Immured in the oldest city on earth, how can he escape And is a Rome ruled by a woman who despises Vespasian any safer than a prison cell.