The Journals of Lewis and Clark PDF/EPUB ´ The

The Journals of Lewis and Clark PDF/EPUB ´ The

The Journals of Lewis and Clark ➬ [Ebook] ➧ The Journals of Lewis and Clark By Meriwether Lewis ➸ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk The Journals of Lewis and Clark are the first report on the West, on the United States over the hill and beyond the sunset, on the province of the American future Bernard DeVotoIn , the great expanse The Journals of Lewis and Clark are of Lewis PDF È the first report on the West, on the United States over the hill and beyond the sunset, on the province of the American future Bernard DeVotoIn , the great expanse of the Louisiana Purchase was an empty canvas Keenly aware that The Journals PDF or the course of the nation s destiny lay westward and that a Voyage of Discovery would be necessary to determine the nature of the frontier President Thomas Jefferson commissioned Meriwether Lewis to lead an expedition from the Missouri River to the northern Pacific coast and back Fromto , accompanied Journals of Lewis PDF/EPUB ¶ by co captain William Clark, the Shoshone guide Sacajawea, and thirty two men, Lewis mapped rivers, traced the principal waterways to the sea, and established the American claim to the territories of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon Together the captains kept this journal a richly detailed record of the flora and fauna they sighted, the native tribes they encountered, and the awe inspiring landscape they traversed, from their base camp near present day St Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River, that has become an incomparable contribution to the literature of exploration and the writing of natural history.


About the Author: Meriwether Lewis

Meriwether Lewis was an American explorer, soldier, of Lewis PDF È and public administrator, best known for his role as the leader of the Lewis and Clark Expedition also known as the Corps of Discovery, with William Clark, whose mission was to explore the territory of the Louisiana Purchase.



10 thoughts on “The Journals of Lewis and Clark

  1. Lexie Lexie says:

    Did you know Lewis and Clark had a dog with them that went all the way to the Pacific and back


  2. Jeff Jeff says:

    The ultimate travel book A well edited and annotated conglomeration of both Lewis Clark s journals of their journey to find the west coast of America and back Truly one of the most amazing journeys ever made by Americans and one that still is probablyamazing than the one made to the moon The writing itself is really interesting and funny for its typical early 19th century disregard for regularity of spellings, but the sheer awesomeness of seeing the things they saw for the first t The ultimate travel book A well edited and annotated conglomeration of both Lewis Clark s journals of their journey to find the west coast of America and back Truly one of the most amazing journeys ever made by Americans and one that still is probablyamazing than the one made to the moon The writing itself is really interesting and funny for its typical early 19th century disregard for regularity of spellings, but the sheer awesomeness of seeing the things they saw for the first time through their eyes is what makes this work truly worth reading again and again Highly recommended


  3. Morgan Morgan says:

    First off, this book has spelling and grammatical errors well for today they would be errors Keep in mind this was written in the early 1800s and they were out in wilderness I m sure they caredabout surviving the trip than wondering how to spell certain words The Penguin Classics edition is raw with the writing I m not sure there is a corrected version, but it s not something I d read I think the errors make this bookentertaining It gives you a look how people wrote Only wit First off, this book has spelling and grammatical errors well for today they would be errors Keep in mind this was written in the early 1800s and they were out in wilderness I m sure they caredabout surviving the trip than wondering how to spell certain words The Penguin Classics edition is raw with the writing I m not sure there is a corrected version, but it s not something I d read I think the errors make this bookentertaining It gives you a look how people wrote Only with today, it makes it a little confusing at times to read and figure out what they are taking about, thankfully there are notes, drawings, and maps.In 1804, Merriweather Lewis and William Clark set out to what becomes their famed expedition Along the way, they accompanied with other men and later Sacajawea Thomas Jefferson wanted a team to go out west to explore new land and wildlife They named some new locations and discovered new wildlife All but Charles Floyd made it back he was the only one to die during the trip This book doesn t cover everything obviously, because it s a firsthand account, but there are neat little facts you can find elsewhere if you are interested.There are a few reasons I was interested in reading this book One When I was in elementary school, I did a report on William Clark that ended up me being really interested in the whole thing, thus me reading other books about the trip Two I m related to one of the member and have the same last name to another related I forget how exactly, but I m related to Alexander Willard, he was a blacksmith and unfortunately was whipped during the expedition Then there is Charles Floyd, I mentioned his significance before Three The last reason I wanted to read the actual journals was the comic book Manifest Destiny, a fictitious account of the travels, but with monsters like Sasquatch The original journals have nothing fantastical about them, but I ended up finding them just as exciting Oddly, the comic book does a good job mimicking how Lewis and Clark described the wildlife.I think my favorite part about reading this journal was the wildlife The descriptions aren t that good at sometimes, but this book makes me feel like I m exploring with them at times One thing I learned or maybe relearned was how much they contributed with science I remember learning they discovered some animals and plants, but didn t really think anything of it until now for some reason Imagine seeing a grizzly bear for the first time or a herd of buffalo or some other animal you never knew existed Today, it seems like most animals are discovered, but I hear about new animals at least once a year I can see why that comic book I mentioned earlier would have them meet Sasquatch Lewis, Clark, and Jefferson didn t know what was out there in the great unknown.I also liked when they talked about other members in the party, mostly the ones I mentioned and Sacagawea Most people today know her as the woman who pointed her finger and helped them not get lost I think she deservescredit She helped them communicate with other Natives, she told them what to eat and not to eat, and Clark seemed to care about her and her child I think people forget that she was a mother She not only did gave birth, but she raised a baby boy during the trip They had some harsh weather and environments, its impressive any of them made it back alive.The survival part, to me, was the most impressive thing about this event this is something I never thought before These people had to be really fit and healthy to make it back alive They weren t just camping for a few days or a week They were gone a little over two years They had to survive during harsh weather like hard rain and cold winters They had to hunt for food and gamble what was edible or not They didn t have cellphones or the technology to contact loved ones we take these things for granted I m sure someone could do what Lewis and Clark did today, but I m not sure I could last as long as they did on their trip.There some other things I like in this book as well I liked the opening letter Thomas Jefferson wrote Lewis explaining what he wants them to do on the trip, what he hopes they find, and to record everything in as much detail as possible There s a list of all the things they brought giving the price of each item That part can get boring, but it s neat if you re into that kind of thing There is a list of questions Clark had about the Native Americans, today, this list looks a little weird, but I think it s important to keep in mind Clark was curious learning about a new culture I mentioned this before, but this book also includes some illustrations Not sure if Penguin included them all or not, but they are worth the look.I think I mentioned everything I wanted to in this review I can get nerdy about this and the Salem Witch Trial when it comes to American history This book isn t the best written historical document it ssomething you read if you re actually interested in the topic To some people, and I completely understand, this book gets dry at points Do we really need to know as a reader what the weather was like every day or do we need to know all the numbers and measurements Not really, but at the same time Lewis and Clark s journals weren t written with a bestseller audience in mind They were writing these for Jefferson and others A modern reader however might get a good adventure story or an interesting look at early American life and wildlife Overall, I had fun reading this book


  4. kiwi kili kiwi kili says:

    These dudes.Seriously.If you want to know what it takes to survive in the wilderness, read these journals.I feel like the general sentiment these days is that Lewis and Clark are both stereotypical, ignorant dorks who crossed America just with Sacagewea to help them and that she pretty much did all the heavy lifting for them That Lewis was the pansy sort of intellectual and Clark the somewhat uneducated but man s man co captain Not true in the slightest For one thing, they had 33 companion These dudes.Seriously.If you want to know what it takes to survive in the wilderness, read these journals.I feel like the general sentiment these days is that Lewis and Clark are both stereotypical, ignorant dorks who crossed America just with Sacagewea to help them and that she pretty much did all the heavy lifting for them That Lewis was the pansy sort of intellectual and Clark the somewhat uneducated but man s man co captain Not true in the slightest For one thing, they had 33 companions with them, including Sacagawea s husband and a French trapper, both of whose names Lewis and Clark routinely butcher the dorks.They were also both terrible spellers, another endearing trait And while Sacagawea certainly helped them, it s not like she blazed the trail and were followed by the ignorant non natives who were completely helpless Nope Not at all In fact, I surprised myself by growing quite fond of them both, though I ll admit I preferred Clark, and though the journals are hardly page turners, there ARE rather intense moments and also rather endearing moments as well Not necessarily in what these two say, but how they say it Honestly, justRead this Seriously It s abridged, it s fun, it s interestingAnd it s history that reads like fiction The best kind


  5. Bill Palladino Bill Palladino says:

    Maybe I m a sap I don t know This book was enthralling from start to finish One of the most pivotal moments in American history as Merriwether Lewis and William Clark set off on a brave expedition of what would soon become United States territory Sent on a mission of exploration and commerce by Thomas Jefferson this duo and their cohorts endure hardship after hardship on their quest to follow the Missouri River to its headwaters and to the Pacific Ocean beyond.The prose is stunning as the tw Maybe I m a sap I don t know This book was enthralling from start to finish One of the most pivotal moments in American history as Merriwether Lewis and William Clark set off on a brave expedition of what would soon become United States territory Sent on a mission of exploration and commerce by Thomas Jefferson this duo and their cohorts endure hardship after hardship on their quest to follow the Missouri River to its headwaters and to the Pacific Ocean beyond.The prose is stunning as the two leaders trade off journaling duties They blithely describe sights never before seen by white men, and now never to be seen again Massive herds of bison Yellowstone park untouched by development hands, roadless expanses of the North American west This is a must read for history buffs, or simply adventurers These two young men make our thrill seeking generation look demure and unaccomplished


  6. Misti Misti says:

    A journal entry or two a day for nearly a year and it was worth every word and hour Clark wasted no words while Lewis was a story teller and their cohesive voices took me on an uncharted journey to the west coast through land that no white man had yet seen at that time.I ve followed many parts of the trails while reading their words I ve stood where they stood and I ve read their words while envisioning what they saw The Journals of Lewis and Clark are words that can change your life This is A journal entry or two a day for nearly a year and it was worth every word and hour Clark wasted no words while Lewis was a story teller and their cohesive voices took me on an uncharted journey to the west coast through land that no white man had yet seen at that time.I ve followed many parts of the trails while reading their words I ve stood where they stood and I ve read their words while envisioning what they saw The Journals of Lewis and Clark are words that can change your life This is historical reading at its finest


  7. Kbh103 Kbh103 says:

    There is something about the imperfect spelling and broken grammar that is flavorful and solid, like the scratches on a vintage record or the fuzz in the background on the radio Also, some of the passages are just flat out cool in their curt yet epic appraisal of the landscape Yep, over there, the Indians won t go near that mountain because it s said that it s defended by Spirits and Little People who will kill you if you get too close Me and Lewis are gonna go check it out tomorrow Liked There is something about the imperfect spelling and broken grammar that is flavorful and solid, like the scratches on a vintage record or the fuzz in the background on the radio Also, some of the passages are just flat out cool in their curt yet epic appraisal of the landscape Yep, over there, the Indians won t go near that mountain because it s said that it s defended by Spirits and Little People who will kill you if you get too close Me and Lewis are gonna go check it out tomorrow Liked it for a while but then my 21st century mind drifted Worth a peek if not for the dazzling walk through a faraway time via the eyes of people who actually lived it


  8. James James says:

    I finished this many years ago but was reminded of it after making a stupid drunken comment on someone else s progress with Mason and Dixon Reason Similar atmosphere in both books, and I really think Pynchon used this as a reference for writing M D as the tone is similar, as well as word choices and even the Germanic use of random capital letters.Next to the first installment of The Diary of Ana s Nin, this is my favorite literary work pulled from journals, letters, diaries, etc ever Loved i I finished this many years ago but was reminded of it after making a stupid drunken comment on someone else s progress with Mason and Dixon Reason Similar atmosphere in both books, and I really think Pynchon used this as a reference for writing MD as the tone is similar, as well as word choices and even the Germanic use of random capital letters.Next to the first installment of The Diary of Ana s Nin, this is my favorite literary work pulled from journals, letters, diaries, etc ever Loved itthan Whitman s Specimen Days Among others I m only bothering to write this because of two reasons 1 Really loved it and 2 I cannot believe that none of the otherwise adventurous and erudite people I stalk on GoodReads have never read it I will divide this review into two parts.Part one The Story Okay so two guys and a huge number of military dudes from the earliest years of the 1800s took on an expedition from St Louis to some shoreline in what is now called Washington They had one single casualty and that was due to an illness conceived by the victim before they had left St Louis Outdoors the expedition experimented with so many ways of survival and travel They left with some lame boots out of St Louis which fell apart and Indians I m going to call them that taught them how to make much better moccasins Indians also showed them how to make canoes your better eventually traverse the white water rapids of many rivers and creeks This leads me to Politics hey did you know that Indians aren t just cool idiots who taught this expedition how to do stuff like this because it was in their nature to do so For most of these tribes, it was their first contact with white people Wow, much diplomacy Seriously These tribes ended up being mainly displaced and exterminated by later white people We ve all heard this narrative but let the one of this expedition amaze you with its humanity and ingenious diplomacy It was an Indian tribe who took this expedition in when they reached the Pacific Ocean and helped them survive the harsh Washington State winter before they returned to St Louis This was a manly and adult expedition and the relations between the white males in the expedition and the Native Americans is so fucking righteous it s a real goddamn shame that every other person to go west had to face political warfare with the natives after too much posturing and insensitive colonialism by just a few white people with a short attention span, low IQ and a power complex Part two flora and fauna and writing Lewis and Clark were scientists and writers Highly educated And amazing writing Imagine National Geographic limited to just writing instead of edited videos and pictures and they re exploring huge areas of new land and these are the two guys chosen to do it Yes Yes it s that good They document all the new plants they find They document all the new animals Most notable was the grizzly bear The composed writing about this animal which continues to terrorize today is amazing The familiar bear to Europeans in England s new world was the black bear, which was something like an overgrown raccoon I mean, it is This expedition captures the first time educated white people ever met a grizzly bear, which is brown and generally three times the size of a black bear Why do I say educated white people Because back then being able to write was like having an iPhone with YouTube This is the first account of that experience Not a single man in the expedition was killed by a grizzly They noted that the way to kill this bear which would stand on its hind legs, roar while showing its fangs and claws upon encounter was to shoot it between the eyes These men were carrying muskets


  9. Rikard Bergquist Rikard Bergquist says:

    A somewhat cumbersome, laborious read Echoing the musquetos, eye knots and prickly pears pestering Lewis and Clark and their Corps of Discovery.


  10. Lostinanovel Lostinanovel says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Wow I was expecting something slow but this was a thriller Seeing the great West unfold before these men was an exciting read Made me wonder why I read fictional adventures when this is out there Sacajawea steals the show in the early part of the book These great men really depend on her She guides them, teaches them what to eat and translates Her husband was a bit of an ass always getting sore feet, sinking a boat, unable to swim, but they got to take him along because they need her 2 we Wow I was expecting something slow but this was a thriller Seeing the great West unfold before these men was an exciting read Made me wonder why I read fictional adventures when this is out there Sacajawea steals the show in the early part of the book These great men really depend on her She guides them, teaches them what to eat and translates Her husband was a bit of an ass always getting sore feet, sinking a boat, unable to swim, but they got to take him along because they need her 2 weeks into picking her up, she gives birth to a baby and she hauls this kid around the entire 2 3 years When she takes ill, the entire company 50 or so men all halt and LC personally see to her health They are constantly sending out scout parties before the larger group presses on and you repeated hear that the scout crew consisted of Myself L or C , 2 lieutenants, the Indian woman and her baby The baby Seriously How did she feed the damn thing The most dramatic moment occurs at a meeting with the Snake Indians She is sitting with LC when the Chief enters the scene and she breaks down crying because one of the Chief s men is her brother Turns out she was kidnapped from the Snakes during a war and hadn t seen him for years This is why she knows the way and can speak so many languages What life brings.LC give some extraordinary accounts of the West of course This was a group under orders from President Jefferson They went about notifying each group they encountered trappers or Indians that these lands were now under the power of the US There are even a few stand offs with guns drawn They recorded what they saw, taking geological surveys, and their encounters with different animals including Grizzlies and little wolves coyotes They send a live prairie dog back to the President They also discuss the various Indian customs and compare the different tribes One interesting issue is that LC s men had sex all up and down the west as the Indian men offered them their women VD became serious problem Interesting how the two leaders differed Lewis is very introspective in his writing and can be hard on himself He eventually years later commits suicide Clark is matter of fact but he also ends up the one who is truly thankful to Sacajawea and provides for the education of her child.An amazing adventure story An easy read Highly recommended for any American


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