Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game Epub

Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game Epub


Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game ➩ [Ebook] ➤ Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game By Bob Gibson ➵ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Pitch by Pitch gets inside the head of Bob Gibson on October , , when he took the mound for game one of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers and struck out a record seventeen battersWith the te Pitch by Pitch gets inside the head of Pitch: My ePUB ☆ Bob Gibson on October when he took the Pitch by PDF/EPUB or mound for game one of the World Series against the Detroit Tigers and struck out a record by Pitch: My Epub ß seventeen battersWith the tension rising in the stadium, an uproarious crowd behind him, and the record for the most strikeouts thrown in a World Series game on the line, Gibson, known as one of the most intimidating pitchers in baseball history, relives every inning and each pitch of this iconic game Facing down batter after batter, he breaks down his though process and recounts in vivid and candid detail his analysis of the players who stepped into the batter s box against him, his control of both the ball and the elements of the day, and his moments of synchronicity with teammate Tim McCarver, all the while capturing the fascinating relationship and unspoken dialogue that carries on between pitcher and catcher over the course of nine critical inningsFrom the dugout to the locker room, Gibson offers a behind the scenes look at the lives of the players, the team s chemistry, and clubhouse culture He recounts the story of Curt Flood, Gibson s best friend and the Cardinal center fielder, who would go on to become one of the pioneers of free agency shares colorful anecdotes of his interactions with some of baseball s most unforgettable names, from Denny McLain and Roger Maris to Sandy Koufax and Harry Caray and relives the confluence of events, both on and off the field, that led to one of his and baseball s most memorable games everThis deep, unfiltered insider look at one particular afternoon of baseball allows for a better understanding of how pros play the game and all the variables that a pitcher contends with as he navigates his way through a formidable lineup Gibson s extraordinary and engrossing tale is retold from the unique viewpoint of an extremely perceptive pitcher who happens to be one of baseball s all time greats.

    Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game Epub the most strikeouts thrown in a World Series game on the line, Gibson, known as one of the most intimidating pitchers in baseball history, relives every inning and each pitch of this iconic game Facing down batter after batter, he breaks down his though process and recounts in vivid and candid detail his analysis of the players who stepped into the batter s box against him, his control of both the ball and the elements of the day, and his moments of synchronicity with teammate Tim McCarver, all the while capturing the fascinating relationship and unspoken dialogue that carries on between pitcher and catcher over the course of nine critical inningsFrom the dugout to the locker room, Gibson offers a behind the scenes look at the lives of the players, the team s chemistry, and clubhouse culture He recounts the story of Curt Flood, Gibson s best friend and the Cardinal center fielder, who would go on to become one of the pioneers of free agency shares colorful anecdotes of his interactions with some of baseball s most unforgettable names, from Denny McLain and Roger Maris to Sandy Koufax and Harry Caray and relives the confluence of events, both on and off the field, that led to one of his and baseball s most memorable games everThis deep, unfiltered insider look at one particular afternoon of baseball allows for a better understanding of how pros play the game and all the variables that a pitcher contends with as he navigates his way through a formidable lineup Gibson s extraordinary and engrossing tale is retold from the unique viewpoint of an extremely perceptive pitcher who happens to be one of baseball s all time greats."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 237 pages
  • Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game
  • Bob Gibson
  • 24 November 2019
  • 1250061040

About the Author: Bob Gibson

BOB GIBSON is a baseball Hall of Famer Pitch: My ePUB ☆ who played seasons for the St Louis Pitch by PDF/EPUB or Cardinals During that time he was a two time Cy Young Award and World Series winner He by Pitch: My Epub ß is also the author of Stranger to the Game The Autobiography of Bob Gibson and Sixty Feet, Six Inches, which was written with Reggie Jackson and coauthor Lonnie Wheeler and Pitch by Pitch My View of One Unforgettable Game, also written with Wheeler.



10 thoughts on “Pitch by Pitch: My View of One Unforgettable Game

  1. John Kaufmann John Kaufmann says:

    My one baseball book of the year Solid, but not great not quite as good as I was expecting It s a pitch by pitch account of game 1 of the 1968 World Series between Gibson s St Louis Cardinals and the AL s champion Detroit Tigers The game featured the author pitching for the Cards against the last 30 game winner Denny McLain, both of whom won their respective league s Cy Young award for best pitcher of the year and the Most Valuable Player award It is interesting at times, especially with My one baseball book of the year Solid, but not great not quite as good as I was expecting It s a pitch by pitch account of game 1 of the 1968 World Series between Gibson s St Louis Cardinals and the AL s champion Detroit Tigers The game featured the author pitching for the Cards against the last 30 game winner Denny McLain, both of whom won their respective league s Cy Young award for best pitcher of the year and the Most Valuable Player award It is interesting at times, especially with good hitters batting, but it also gets quite tedious and repetitive after a while The pitch by pitch account is interspersed with stories and anecdotes about the other players in the game Lou Brock, Curt Flood, Orlando Cepeda, Mike Shannon, Dal Maxvill, Al Kaline, Willie Horton, Bill Freehan, Jim Northrup, etc It also included some other stars from other teams that Gibson played against over his career, which, while interesting, disrupted the flow of the main storyline The book also had numerous gratuitous comments reminding us about the records Gibson holds

  2. Steven Peterson Steven Peterson says:

    This is a fascinating work And one that resonates with me, since I watched the 1968 World Series on TV This book is a pitch by pitch analysis by the winning pitcher in that game the great and formidable Bob Gibson I can still see in my mind his wrenching and powerful pitching style The pitch by pitch analysis comes from Gibson s memory of events and a video of the game between his St Louis Cardinals and the Detroit Tigers And that is what makes this such a good read Such detail And one i This is a fascinating work And one that resonates with me, since I watched the 1968 World Series on TV This book is a pitch by pitch analysis by the winning pitcher in that game the great and formidable Bob Gibson I can still see in my mind his wrenching and powerful pitching style The pitch by pitch analysis comes from Gibson s memory of events and a video of the game between his St Louis Cardinals and the Detroit Tigers And that is what makes this such a good read Such detail And one is reminded of quirky players Dick McAuliffe s batting stance made me think that he could not hit at all but he was a good hitter and a scrappy player , role players Dal Maxvill or the Cardinals , great players Al Kaline of the Tigers and Orlando Cepeda of the Cardnals , and winners such as catcher for the Cards Tim McCarver Other players of repute Norm Cash, Bill Freehan, Mickey Stanley, Lou Brock, Curt Flood, and Roger Maris closing out his major league career.The pitch by pitch analysis is a nice conceit in this book One feels a certain degree of suspense as the game is described Yeah, I already knew that the Cards won, but the book is written such as one doesn t really know how a specific at bat goes.Anther thing that makes this book such a good read is the writing style Lonnie Wheeler is listed in small print as a co author I would guess that he did a good job in compiling, organizing, and editing Gibson s recollections But the writing style seems to me to be in Bob Gibson s words And the narrative is witty and also suggestive of a very smart person with a good command of English It is quite literate in that, reminiscent of much earlier works by ex players such as Jim Brosnan and Jim Bouton although Gibson may be even better.Anyhow, a terrific book, bringing back to my mind the baseball played in the 1960s And this being one of the better World Series of that period, with a great cast of players involved.Well worth reading

  3. Doctor Moss Doctor Moss says:

    This is the book I hoped Daniel Okrent s Nine Innings would be when I read it years ago Okrent s book was good, but I think this is better.Bob Gibson was incredible in 1968 Denny McLain was, too Gibson s 1.12 ERA and McLain s 31 wins are mind boggling, even given that it was the year of the pitcher And they were the opposing pitchers in the opening game of the World Series that year Gibson s done us a huge favor by putting himself back on that day and telling us everything that went throu This is the book I hoped Daniel Okrent s Nine Innings would be when I read it years ago Okrent s book was good, but I think this is better.Bob Gibson was incredible in 1968 Denny McLain was, too Gibson s 1.12 ERA and McLain s 31 wins are mind boggling, even given that it was the year of the pitcher And they were the opposing pitchers in the opening game of the World Series that year Gibson s done us a huge favor by putting himself back on that day and telling us everything that went through his mind, batter by batter, pitch by pitch.Casual baseball fans complain that the game is too slow, that, for most of the game, nothing is really happening But most of what happens in baseball happens when nothing is happening It s the strategizing, and it s the pitcher vs batter mental matchup if you watch a game for action, I think you re missing the best part.And that s what Gibson tells us It s all about what pitch to throw and where to throw it when What did I throw this guy before How was his swing on that fastball What is he expecting now Am I getting too tired to rely on my slider Several things impressed me about Gibson in particular One was his confidence in how he could dictate where a batter would hit a ball not just in the obvious cases where he wanted a double play groundball, but where he just wanted to get a quick out he seems to think some guys aren t even worth the pitches it would take to strike them out.Another is his lack of concern, or even attention, for the positioning of the fielders behind him I remember how Jim Palmer would move outfielders around So far as you can tell from this, Gibson hardly pays any attention And it s not because he intended to strike everyone out in fact, he says, as a rule, he didn t even think about strikeouts until he got two strikes on a batter.Gibson had a reputation as an intimidator But, judging from what he says here yes, it could be cleaned up , that wasn t a big thing He shows a lot of respect for hitters like Norm Cash, Willie Horton, Al Kaline, and Jim Northrup He does move the ball in and out, setting up sliders away by first throwing fastballs in and off the plate But I would expect any pitcher to do that.And he does watch body language He notices when batters step out of the box, to reset themselves, and he thinks about what he can conclude from it He notices Northrup move up a step in the batter s box, and he thinks Northrup must be moving up to hit a breaking pitch before it breaks So Northrup gets a fastball.It s all pretty good stuff And even if you know that this is how a pitcher thinks, it s different hearing it, pitch by pitch, from the pitcher himself I m giving the book four stars instead of five, just because, like a pitching duel itself, I suspect it doesn t appeal to everyone The action is in Gibson s head, not on the field.Honestly, it d be interesting to hear the same kind of account from a pitcher who is very different from Gibson Maybe somebody without Gibson s overpowering fastball I d love to hear Luis Tiant s thoughts pitch by pitch Or maybe a pitcher who just wasn t as good, to understand the struggles he s going through

  4. Bill Pence Bill Pence says:

    Bob Gibson, now 82 years old, is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame He played seventeen seasons with the St Louis Cardinals During that time, he won two Cy Young Awards and pitched for two World Series champs In this book he takes the reader through each pitch of game one of the 1968 World Series against the Detroit Tigers, 50 years ago Gibson was coming off of a record setting season in which he had an earned run average of an incredible 1.12 His opponent in the October 2 game was Denn Bob Gibson, now 82 years old, is a member of the Baseball Hall of Fame He played seventeen seasons with the St Louis Cardinals During that time, he won two Cy Young Awards and pitched for two World Series champs In this book he takes the reader through each pitch of game one of the 1968 World Series against the Detroit Tigers, 50 years ago Gibson was coming off of a record setting season in which he had an earned run average of an incredible 1.12 His opponent in the October 2 game was Denny McLain, who won an unbelievable 31 games for the Tigers So, we had two pitchers at the top of their games going in game one on a warm October afternoon in St Louis.I really enjoyed Gibson s insights on each pitch He takes the reader through his thought process on what he was planning to throw and how it turned out In between, he tells some very interesting stories about his Cardinal teammates and the Tigers he was facing As a baseball fan and a Cardinal fan, I loved every page of this book.One story in particular was of personal interest He tells of Cardinal Curt Simmons getting Hank Aaron out on change up pitches He writes When Aaron finally timed one of Simmons s slowballs and clubbed it over the fence, he was called out for stepping on the plate The fascinating thing about that story is that I was at that August 18, 1965 game in St Louis at the original Busch Stadium initially called Sportsman Park , as an 8 year old boy with my family when that took place.Gibson writes in a confident manner about racial issues, his pitching The slider was next and it was perfect, if you don t mind my saying so, catcher McCarver Tim has since confessed that he can t think of a single intelligent thing he ever pointed out to me in our little mid inning visits, his roommate Curt Flood s challenge of major league baseball s reserve clause, and much, much .Gibson would break Sandy Koufax s World Series strikeout record in the game and the Cardinals would win, but ultimately lose the series.If you are a baseball fan, and in particular a Cardinals fan, you ll love this book

  5. Joe Strnad Joe Strnad says:

    Gibson s approach to pitching, based on the inning and situation, is the most insightful meaningful aspect of his book The ultra competitive ace pitched an insane number of innings during the 1960s Pitcher used to start every fourth day instead of every fifth like today s players Gibson intently established the inside part of the plate in order to setup fastballs on the outside corner He details the difference between pitching inside vs throwing inside strikes A subtle difference that seem Gibson s approach to pitching, based on the inning and situation, is the most insightful meaningful aspect of his book The ultra competitive ace pitched an insane number of innings during the 1960s Pitcher used to start every fourth day instead of every fifth like today s players Gibson intently established the inside part of the plate in order to setup fastballs on the outside corner He details the difference between pitching inside vs throwing inside strikes A subtle difference that seems lost on many pitchers now.Entertaining clubhouse stories are peppered throughout the chapters As a diehard Cardinals fan, I enjoyed hearing about legends Brock, Cepeda, McCarver, and Shannon This book gave me a knew appreciation for Cards catcher Tim McCarver Gibson credits McCarver for much of his and the team s sustained success during the decade Ball player nicknames and pre game rituals are also included Mike Shannon was known as The Moon Man by his teammates For anyone who has listened to Cardinals radio broadcasts and wondered what planet is he on this fits well Apparently Shannon s teammates didn t know what he was talking about half the time either Curt Flood deserves his own biography He stood up to Gussie Busch and challenged MLB s reserve clause Gibson gives a brief description of Flood s life post baseball which piqued my interest Recommended for knowledgeable baseball fans anywhere.On deck a quality Curt Flood bio

  6. Chuck Neumann Chuck Neumann says:

    An excellent baseball book Bob Gibson talks about his great game 1 win in the 1968 World Series over the Detroit Tigers when he set a new World Series record for strikeouts in a game He goes into the game, as the title says, pitch by pitch That might sound boring, but Gibson makes it very entertaining His memory of the game nearly 50 years ago is remarkable, aided by the video of the game He also goes into the other players in the game, both teammates on the Cardinals as well as the Tigers, An excellent baseball book Bob Gibson talks about his great game 1 win in the 1968 World Series over the Detroit Tigers when he set a new World Series record for strikeouts in a game He goes into the game, as the title says, pitch by pitch That might sound boring, but Gibson makes it very entertaining His memory of the game nearly 50 years ago is remarkable, aided by the video of the game He also goes into the other players in the game, both teammates on the Cardinals as well as the Tigers, revealing information that greatly helps the book He does also cover the rest of the series, in which the Tigers won in game 7, when Lolich beat Gibson But mainly it concerns Game one, and he does so in brilliant fashion You really get to know Bob Gibson, and he is worth knowing Highly recommend this book to baseball fans

  7. John Kennedy John Kennedy says:

    The book contains interesting vignettes about all in the starting lineup on the Cardinals and the Tigers in 1968 There is too much minutia about the pitch by pitch selection of the game in question, the first game of the 1968 World Series when Gibson set the record for strikeouts, 17 His feelings for his teammates is on display He loved catcher Tim McCarver like a brother He got irritated with light hitting shortstop Dal Maxvill, who refused to work harder at becoming a better hitter Th The book contains interesting vignettes about all in the starting lineup on the Cardinals and the Tigers in 1968 There is too much minutia about the pitch by pitch selection of the game in question, the first game of the 1968 World Series when Gibson set the record for strikeouts, 17 His feelings for his teammates is on display He loved catcher Tim McCarver like a brother He got irritated with light hitting shortstop Dal Maxvill, who refused to work harder at becoming a better hitter There are insightful comments about the tumultuous events of 1968 This marked Gibson s best season, at age 32, and his 1.12 ERA is the best by a starter in the past century The book contains much baseball history woven into the narrative, including Gibson s best friend and roommate Curt Flood, who later challenged baseball s reserve clause and opened the path to free agency

  8. David David says:

    On October 2, 1968, Bob Gibson struck out 17 Detroit Tigers in the World Series, a record that still stands He also set the live ball era since 1920 record for the lowest earned run average 1.12 during a season in which he got surprisingly little offensive support from his team Gibson s fierce demeanor, intelligence, and willingness to remind batters that he too had a claim to the inside of the plate, made him an intimidating presence on the mound If you think baseball is boring, as man On October 2, 1968, Bob Gibson struck out 17 Detroit Tigers in the World Series, a record that still stands He also set the live ball era since 1920 record for the lowest earned run average 1.12 during a season in which he got surprisingly little offensive support from his team Gibson s fierce demeanor, intelligence, and willingness to remind batters that he too had a claim to the inside of the plate, made him an intimidating presence on the mound If you think baseball is boring, as many people do, this pitch by pitch account, accompanied by entertaining anecdotes and insights, demonstrates the strategic storm that lies beneath the plodding calm of the game

  9. Matthew Bachmann Matthew Bachmann says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Surprisingly boring Was hoping for pitching insights and what Gibson offered was 200 pages of I throw what I want, when I want, because I m Bob Gibson I did learn a lot about Cardinals history and realized how little I do know about the Cardinals pre 1980s Gibson comes off as arrogant and a real jerk to be teammates with Not really my opinion so much as Gibsonless admits this throughout the book Only recommended if you want backstory on the late 60s Cardinals like Flood, Javier a Surprisingly boring Was hoping for pitching insights and what Gibson offered was 200 pages of I throw what I want, when I want, because I m Bob Gibson I did learn a lot about Cardinals history and realized how little I do know about the Cardinals pre 1980s Gibson comes off as arrogant and a real jerk to be teammates with Not really my opinion so much as Gibsonless admits this throughout the book Only recommended if you want backstory on the late 60s Cardinals like Flood, Javier and Mike Shannon

  10. Brett Marshall Brett Marshall says:

    While reading pitch by pitch by Bob Gibson and Lonnie Wheeler I truly enjoyed the way the authors accelerated the story inning by inning, pitch by pitch, and batter by batter, analyzing each batter for the Detroit Tigers and St Louis Cardinals going through how they batted and his personal relationships with them, as well as giving his own thoughts on the game of baseball and what he thought of breaking the Sandy Koufax one game strikeout record, which truly makes this an excellent read.

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