Hubris: The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century ePUB

Hubris: The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century ePUB

Hubris: The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century ➽ [Reading] ➿ Hubris: The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century By Alistair Horne ➲ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk The legendary historian and author of A Savage War of Peace and The Price of Glory distills a lifetime s study to reflect on six critical battles that changed the course of the twentieth centurySir Al The legendary historian Tragedy of PDF/EPUB » and author of A Savage War of Peace and The Price of Glory distills a lifetime s study to reflect on six critical battles that changed the course of the twentieth centurySir Alistair Horne has been a close observer of war and history for than fifty years In this wise and masterly work that he calls his summa, he revisits six battles of the past century and examines the strategies, leadership, preparation, and Hubris: The PDF/EPUB ² geopolitical goals of aggressors and defenders, to reveal the one trait that links them all hubrisIn Greek tragedy, hubris is excessive human pride that challenges the gods and ultimately leads to downfall From the Battle of Tsushima in the Russo Japanese War to Hitler sinvasion of Moscow to MacArthur s disastrous advance in Korea, Horne shows how each of these battles was won or lost due to excessive hubris on one side or the other In a The Tragedy of PDF Ê sweeping narrative written with his trademark erudition and wit, Horne provides a meticulously detailed analysis of the ground maneuvers employed by the opposing armies in each battle He also explores the strategic and psychological mindset of the military leaders involved to demonstrate how a devastating combination of human ambition and arrogance led to overreach Making clear the danger of hubris in warfare, his insights are deeply relevant and hold important lessons for civilian and military leaders navigating today s complex global landscapeA dramatic, colorful, stylishly written history, complete with apage black and white photo insert and maps, Hubris is a brilliant and much needed reflection on war from a master of his field.


About the Author: Alistair Horne

Sir Alistair Allan Tragedy of PDF/EPUB » Horne was an English journalist, biographer and historian of Europe, especially of th and th century France He wrotethan books on travel, history, and biography He won the following awards Hawthornden Prize, , for The Price of Glory Yorkshire Post Book of the Year Prize and Wolfson Literary Award, both , both for A Savage War of Peace Algeria French L gion d Honneur, , for work on French history Hubris: The PDF/EPUB ² and Commander of the British Empire CBE , .



10 thoughts on “Hubris: The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century

  1. Ian Ian says:

    Military historian Alistair Horne writes here about six 20th century conflicts that he argues are linked by the theme of hubris For a British author he tackles this in a very non Eurocentric way Five of the conflicts are in the Asia Pacific region and the other is the Battle of Moscow in 1941.I wasn t entirely convinced about the theme I think any unsuccessful general could probably be accused of hubris after the event I have a slight suspicion that the connecting theme was a device to jus Military historian Alistair Horne writes here about six 20th century conflicts that he argues are linked by the theme of hubris For a British author he tackles this in a very non Eurocentric way Five of the conflicts are in the Asia Pacific region and the other is the Battle of Moscow in 1941.I wasn t entirely convinced about the theme I think any unsuccessful general could probably be accused of hubris after the event I have a slight suspicion that the connecting theme was a device to justify a book about otherwise unconnected battles Be that as it may, this was a decent read if you are interested in 20th century history Alistair Horne writes in a lively style and even the better known battles like Moscow and Midway are retold in dramatic fashion One thing I hadn t known before was that Stalin knew in advance of the Japanese plan to attack Pearl Harbor He had been informed by his superspy Richard Sorge, but of course he didn t pass the information on to the Americans.The weakest chapter was the one on the Korean War, which was much too short for the subject and seems to have been included because MacArthur s advance to the Yalu can fairly be described as a glaring example of hubris I was also a little disappointed about the chapter on the Battle of Nomonhan which the Russians and Mongolians call the Battle of Khalkhin Gol This little known conflict may have had a strategic significance well beyond its fame, since the Japanese suffered a crushing defeat which probably deterred them from a subsequent attack on the USSR during WWII There was a lot in this chapter which was new to me, but I would say the re telling of the battle is a little flat in comparison to some of the other chapters.For me the chapters on Tsushima and Dien Bien Phu were probably the best Although I knew the basic details the book provided me with a lot of new information Something else I hadn t known was that the Russo Japanese War started with the Japanese launching a surprise attack on the Russian Fleet at anchor in Port Arthur, without a Declaration of War and whilst diplomatic negotiations were ongoing, almost identical circumstances to Pearl Harbor At the time Japan and Britain were allies and The Times described the Japanese attack as this dashing and courageous exploit As the author points out These were hardly the words that would be used on the Day of Infamy thirty seven years later I suppose it all comes down to the old saying that Great Powers don t have friends or enemies, only interests


  2. Joseph Stieb Joseph Stieb says:

    This is presumably Alistair Horne s last work, and it s a solid end to a life of journalism and research in military affairs Horne, as always, is an engaging writer and grand storyteller The book is an odd sort of project, though It s really just 6 battles wars that he had never written much about in the past and wanted to in his old age He covers Tsushima, Khalkin Gol, Moscow, Midway, the Korean War, and Dien Bien Phu Scholars won t find a lot to chew on here, but military buffs will reall This is presumably Alistair Horne s last work, and it s a solid end to a life of journalism and research in military affairs Horne, as always, is an engaging writer and grand storyteller The book is an odd sort of project, though It s really just 6 battles wars that he had never written much about in the past and wanted to in his old age He covers Tsushima, Khalkin Gol, Moscow, Midway, the Korean War, and Dien Bien Phu Scholars won t find a lot to chew on here, but military buffs will really enjoy his accounts of these campaigns In particular, Horne does a great job explaining the rise and fall of Japan By far the best and longest of his sections in this book are on Tsushima and Khalkin Gol, two underrated and largely unknown battles that had immense effects on 20th century history and the Second World War in particular.The thesis of the book is loose, inexact, but still interesting He faults leaders in each of these battles for their decisions made under the fog of hubris Of course, there s so much that goes into winning or losing that Horne can t just boil everything down to hubris Much of the hubris has to do with leaders Russia s assumption that they could sail around the world and beat Japan in 1904 1905 the Kwantung Army s underestimation of Soviet tank units in Mongolia Yamamoto s multi objective plans in the Pacific that spread his forces too thin Hitler s various forms of hubris during Barbarossa, French underestimation and disdain for the Viet Minh, and, well, Macarthur A common theme here is the victory disease people and societies who are on a roll tend to become less cognizant of their own fallibility and weaknesses, and they arelikely to bite offthan they can chew as a result Racial prejudice also played a major role in virtually all of these cases The peripeteia or downfall of the hubristic protagonist in each of these cases was deeply costly, in many cases setting the stage for the virtual destruction of societies A final interesting point by This book only covers 6 battles, and only in the 21st century Horne s epilogue covers the transformation of Israel s attitudes after the Six Days War and the formation of their own victory disease I would have loved a separate chapter on this But, like most history, it should impress a sense of humility in its readers Far from the can do spirit, a lifetime of studying conflict has convinced Horne that human beings almost cannot look at themselves and their rivals objectively, and that our inherent flaws make war, the most perilous human enterprise, very likely to blow back in our faces For any person or nation to convince themselves that they are exempt from these foibles is to cover up their historical rear view mirrors and drive blindly into the fog of war


  3. Paul Paul says:

    Hubris The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth CenturySir Alistair Horne, renowned historian, author, teacher and mentor, has published Hubris his view of the twentieth century through six battles that changed the course of the twentieth century and help to define the world in which we live While some may complain that he has selected only 6 battles in what was a very bloody twentieth century, I am sure Sir Alistair would remind people that the 20th century had plenty of wars in every decade, and Hubris The Tragedy of War in the Twentieth CenturySir Alistair Horne, renowned historian, author, teacher and mentor, has published Hubris his view of the twentieth century through six battles that changed the course of the twentieth century and help to define the world in which we live While some may complain that he has selected only 6 battles in what was a very bloody twentieth century, I am sure Sir Alistair would remind people that the 20th century had plenty of wars in every decade, and if he were to attempt to write about them all, rather than a readable book we would get an unreadable encyclopaedia Yes, his choices are subjective, but then so is any choice of subject historians choose to write on, but with his chosen battles there is objectivity As professor Niall Ferguson has already stated about this book is that Hubris is his title and his leitmotifprecisely, the overconfidence that so often leads to military disaster All six battles in this book highlight this, the hubris of the leadership is what led them to disaster, and Hitler s attempt to capture Moscow in 1941 encapsulates this.What we get is a sensible and sobering read about battles in the first fifty years of the twentieth century, and what we get is a sharp insight, observation and comment from Horne He explains why he chose these six battles and the first fifty years, as he considers them the bloodiest of the century If he were to continue longer then the book would no longer be readable as it currently is This book is designed as well as those with an academic interest in the wars of the twentieth century, but the general reader, those that which to gain some insight of historical battles So what we get is a detailed analysis of the manoeuvres of the combatant armies in each battle, the strategies used and the leadership He also explains the geopolitical goals of the aggressors and those being attacked What comes through is that in each of these battles there was a devastating combination of ambition and arrogance that led to the overreach In other words, the hubris that brought their plans crashing to the ground.This an interesting book, especially for the general reader who wants to understandabout how, why and how some of the biggest battles came about, and how the victors were often those that had been attacked This is one of the most readable accounts on a subject that is not often considered, the hubris of the leadership


  4. Liam Liam says:

    I got this book for 6, and at that price point I d probably rate this higher but as a book, I wasn t that fussed Hubris covers six conflicts, three in detail and three very briefly The first is Tsushima, the Japanese defeat of Russia in a large naval battle in the Tsushima Strait, a battle I d heard of but never learned about this was good, nice and detailed and interesting.The second is the Battle of Nomonhan, a slapfight between Russia and Japan in north western Manchuria just prior to I got this book for 6, and at that price point I d probably rate this higher but as a book, I wasn t that fussed Hubris covers six conflicts, three in detail and three very briefly The first is Tsushima, the Japanese defeat of Russia in a large naval battle in the Tsushima Strait, a battle I d heard of but never learned about this was good, nice and detailed and interesting.The second is the Battle of Nomonhan, a slapfight between Russia and Japan in north western Manchuria just prior to the outbreak of WWII, which was the main cause for Japan going south into the Pacific and eventually America rather than trying their hand at conquering Russia This was interesting, but quite brief.The third is the Battle of Moscow, another battle I ve heard about but never learned about, in favour of it spopular brother the Battle of Stalingrad Very interesting, very detailed Good stuff.Fourth, the Battle of Midway another battle I ve heard a ton about but never knew anything about Quite detailed, interesting and neat.The fifth and sixth barely deserve to be in the book Horne gives an incredibly brief overview of the Korean War, in less than 30 pages and then the battle of Dien Bien Phu, a battle I ve now read two 500 page books on, so his 25 pages worth of coverage he saw fit to give it didn t really impress me very much.I hope this book wasn t an indicator for Horne s ability in general, as I have A Savage War of Peace Algeria, 1954 1962 to read of his but for 6, hell, it wasn t bad


  5. Daniel (Attack of the Books!) Burton Daniel (Attack of the Books!) Burton says:

    Fascinating and with the touch of a master storyteller s hand, if there s one history I will recommend this Christmas season, it will be Alistair Horne s Hubris the Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century Interesting and accessible, Horne s approach is a narrative that doesn t merely tell a story, but also examines hubris in the tides of battle It is well researched, cites relevant sources and histories, and is persuasive, not to mention thoroughly engaging to read Beginning with the Russo J Fascinating and with the touch of a master storyteller s hand, if there s one history I will recommend this Christmas season, it will be Alistair Horne s Hubris the Tragedy of War in the Twentieth Century Interesting and accessible, Horne s approach is a narrative that doesn t merely tell a story, but also examines hubris in the tides of battle It is well researched, cites relevant sources and histories, and is persuasive, not to mention thoroughly engaging to read Beginning with the Russo Japanese War of 1905 and ending with the last battle of the First Indochina War the second being our Vietnam War , Dien Bien Phu, all of the battles that Horne examines fall roughly in the first half of the twentieth century, and with the exception of the Battle of the Straights of Tsushima, the final of the Russo Japanese War, are all closely grouped around a period extending from 1939 to 1954 I m sure there are plenty of histories that include each of the battles, but it was fascinating to view them through the lens of a nation or leader acting on hubris and taking his force beyond their capabilities In Tsushima, we see the last battle between battleships, the last time a battleship was sunk by force of cannons With its fleet in the Pacific scattered by the Japanese, Russia sent its Baltic Fleet around the Horn of Africa, across the Indian Ocean, and north to bolster defenses on the Korean peninsula With building drama and suspense, Horne tells the story of the opposing admirals, each with dramatically different personalities and management styles Here are the vivid colors of a final engagement equal in decisiveness to the English and French meeting at Trafalgar under Lord Nelson Japan and Russia are also the opposing forces in Horne s second battle, over thirty years later at Nomonhan inside of Mongolia It is Gregory Zhukov s first major step on the world stage, and it will bring him to Stalin s attention as Zhukov first executes the maneuvers that he will later use against the Germans during Operation Barbarossa during the invasion of Russia.It is during this invasion that we see Stalin stand in shocked silence at the news that Germans have invaded the Fatherland, despite repeated warnings not only from military leaders but from spies abroad In what will become the largest battle in history and a turning point in the war, Hitler will extend himself too far to attempt to capture Moscow and, like Napoleon before him, be defeated by poor planning and the Russian winter.The fourth engagement is the Battle of Midway, early in the United States involvement in World War II, and interestingly, it is the third that involves the Japanese Last is a combination of General McArthur in Korea and the French in Indochina Vietnam I ve recently read The Generals, by Thomas Ricks, which overlaps the Korea war therein, but this was the first account I ve read about Dien Bien Phu.In each battle, Horne doesthan just lay out the battle lines and order of battle He steps back and sketches out relevant previous history leading up to it, providing context and color to the personalities behind the facts, dates, and troop movements I found the writing absolutely fascinating, and I would definitely consider reading other books by Horne


  6. James James says:

    Thought provoking too much of military history is about dates, places, machines, logistics, and what went right wrong but not why This is about the titular psychological failing and its devastating impact on the lives of millions.The author had to choose from enough examples from the 20th century to fill an encyclopedia, and chose well where he did cover well known events, he looked at aspects that haven t been as well documented as the rest of the picture.This should be required reading in Thought provoking too much of military history is about dates, places, machines, logistics, and what went right wrong but not why This is about the titular psychological failing and its devastating impact on the lives of millions.The author had to choose from enough examples from the 20th century to fill an encyclopedia, and chose well where he did cover well known events, he looked at aspects that haven t been as well documented as the rest of the picture.This should be required reading in officer training everywhere


  7. Mike Mike says:

    Horne presents some intense and engaging depictions of battles throughout the 20th century and I enjoyed learning about encounters I knew little about At the same time, the stories never come together as a coherent book Rather than carrying the thread of hubris throughout, this feelslike a collection of essays about wars Horne finds interesting I would have felt better about all of this if it were the latter But as it claims to be the former, I have to be a bitcritical due to the Horne presents some intense and engaging depictions of battles throughout the 20th century and I enjoyed learning about encounters I knew little about At the same time, the stories never come together as a coherent book Rather than carrying the thread of hubris throughout, this feelslike a collection of essays about wars Horne finds interesting I would have felt better about all of this if it were the latter But as it claims to be the former, I have to be a bitcritical due to the shortcomings of the author s intended project


  8. Shelley Fearn Shelley Fearn says:

    Noted historian Horne has written a well researched and documented account of 6 military engagements less well known to lay readers He ties these battles together as representative of hubris, the extreme arrogance to which military and national leader succumb, leading to foolhardy and risky engagements with the enemy The reader is provided a rare glimpse into the psychology of war on a strategic level, the results of failing to examine the lessons of history, and the self aggrandizement of lea Noted historian Horne has written a well researched and documented account of 6 military engagements less well known to lay readers He ties these battles together as representative of hubris, the extreme arrogance to which military and national leader succumb, leading to foolhardy and risky engagements with the enemy The reader is provided a rare glimpse into the psychology of war on a strategic level, the results of failing to examine the lessons of history, and the self aggrandizement of leaders Each contributes to poor decisions The consequent defeats are career ending for the leaders, but worse, result in the deaths of countless men and women Highly recommended for readers who like their history well researched, beautifully relayed, and relevant to current events


  9. Amanda Amanda says:

    So, the author clearly knows his stuff the book seems factual and well informed I was bothered throughout, though, because there are absolutely no citations Some, but not all, of the many direct quotes that he uses are attributed, but never directly cited, and he includes a Select Bibliography at the end of the book, which is at least divided by chapter to give the reader some idea of how the sources connect I would find thisforgivable in a Pop History book, but honestly the writing f So, the author clearly knows his stuff the book seems factual and well informed I was bothered throughout, though, because there are absolutely no citations Some, but not all, of the many direct quotes that he uses are attributed, but never directly cited, and he includes a Select Bibliography at the end of the book, which is at least divided by chapter to give the reader some idea of how the sources connect I would find thisforgivable in a Pop History book, but honestly the writing feels too dry to appeal to most of that audience According to FTC regulations I certify that I received this book for free through the Goodreads First Reads program


  10. Craig Fiebig Craig Fiebig says:

    Excellent book for anyone interested in military history as a field of study Also a very strong overview of critical moments and the decision making within the major conflicts of the 20th Century.


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