Fortunes of Richard Mahony PDF ´ Fortunes of eBook

Fortunes of Richard Mahony PDF ´ Fortunes of eBook


Fortunes of Richard Mahony ❮EPUB❯ ✻ Fortunes of Richard Mahony Author Henry Handel Richardson – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Set in Australia during the gold mining boom, this remarkable trilogy is one of the classics of Australian literatureHenry Handel Richardson s great literary achievement, comprising the novels Austral Set in Australia during the gold mining boom, this remarkable trilogy is one of the classics of Australian literatureHenry Handel Richardson s great literary achievement, comprising Fortunes of eBook ´ the novels Australia Felix, The Way Homeand Ultima Thule, weaves together many themes Richard Mahony, despite finding initial contentment with his wife Mary, becomes increasingly dissatified with his ordered life His restlessness is not understood by Mary, who has to endure the constant shattering of her security as Richard desperately attempts to free himself his attempts finally plunge them into poverty In the figure of Richard Mahony, Richardson captures the soul of the emigrant, ever restless, ever searching for some equilibrium, yet never really able to settle anywhere Richard s search, though, is also the universal one for a meaning that will validate and give purpose to his existence.

    Kindle Welcome to the Kindle ereader store contentment with his wife Mary, becomes increasingly dissatified with his ordered life His restlessness is not understood by Mary, who has to endure the constant shattering of her security as Richard desperately attempts to free himself his attempts finally plunge them into poverty In the figure of Richard Mahony, Richardson captures the soul of the emigrant, ever restless, ever searching for some equilibrium, yet never really able to settle anywhere Richard s search, though, is also the universal one for a meaning that will validate and give purpose to his existence."/>
  • Hardcover
  • Fortunes of Richard Mahony
  • Henry Handel Richardson
  • English
  • 13 January 2019
  • 0848259637

About the Author: Henry Handel Richardson

Ethel Florence Lindesay Richardson s use of a pen name, adopted for mixed motives, probably militated against recognition especially when feminist literary history began Maurice Guest Fortunes of eBook ´ was highly praised in Germany when it first appeared in translation in , but received a bad press in England, though it influenced other novelists The publishers bowdlerized the language for the second imprint The trilogy suffered from the long intervals between its three volumes Australia Felix The Way Home and Ultima Thule The last brought overnight fame and the three volumes were published as one in Her fame in England was short lived as late as , when Virago Press republished The Getting of Wisdom, some London critics referred to the author as Mr Richardson Her short stories, The End of a Childhood , and the novel, The Young Cosima , had lukewarm receptionsHenry Handel Richardson s place in Australian literature is important and secure The Fortunes is an archetypal novel of the country, written about the great upsurge of nineteenth century Western capitalism fuelled by the gold discoveries With relentless objectivity it surveys all the main issues which were to define the direction of white Australian society from the s onwards, within the domestic framework of a marriage Powerfully symbolic in a realistic mode it is, as an English critic said in , one of the great inexorable books of the world.



10 thoughts on “Fortunes of Richard Mahony

  1. Ian "Marvin" Graye Ian "Marvin" Graye says:

    Cry Me a RiverI don t think I have ever cried so hard and so long as when I arrived at the end of this book.In Defence of Slow ReadingI read it at a time when I had the time and inclination to embrace and be embraced by a genuine epic.I don t know whether I would be as patient now, but that is my loss.Hopefully, you, with the time available to you, will bepatient than me and you will be rewardedrecently as well.Some things in life, as Paul Keating once said of his political opponent, Cry Me a RiverI don t think I have ever cried so hard and so long as when I arrived at the end of this book.In Defence of Slow ReadingI read it at a time when I had the time and inclination to embrace and be embraced by a genuine epic.I don t know whether I would be as patient now, but that is my loss.Hopefully, you, with the time available to you, will bepatient than me and you will be rewardedrecently as well.Some things in life, as Paul Keating once said of his political opponent, should be done slowly.This book and great literature in general are good examples.I have dropped a star only to protect you from length and sadness, but if you fear neither, it s a five star achievement

  2. Justin Evans Justin Evans says:

    Warning plot spoilers When your country has a tiny population, like Australia s, authors often have to symbolizethan one thing Richardson, for instance, is Australia s Joyce insofar as she wrote one of the great Australian young person comes of age novel She is Australia s Eliot not only did she, like George, give herself a man s name she also knew farabout 19th century intellectual life than most people of her circle would have known, and put that to good work in her novel Warning plot spoilers When your country has a tiny population, like Australia s, authors often have to symbolizethan one thing Richardson, for instance, is Australia s Joyce insofar as she wrote one of the great Australian young person comes of age novel She is Australia s Eliot not only did she, like George, give herself a man s name she also knew farabout 19th century intellectual life than most people of her circle would have known, and put that to good work in her novels She is Australia s Melville, having written a quasi symbolic novel about her young nation s growth and,importantly, its flaws And she s Australia s Mann, having written the country s great realist novel, and one of its great modernist novels But Richardson managed to make them two parts of one massive book, The Fortunes of Richard Mahony Sadly, Richardson s major novel is not as great as that by those men and women, but Richard Mahony is, I m fairly sure, unique in world literature The first volume, Australia Felix, starts out with an astonishing proem, an almost grotesque visual sequence in which men are ensorcelled without witchcraft by the unholy hunger for gold But this is better read as the proem to the novel as a whole Australia Felix is a standard, enjoyable realist tale of a young migrant, who wins a wife, makes some money, and decides to return home In volume two, The Way Home, our hero fails in the old world, returns home, and becomes massively wealthy In Ultima Thule , his wealth gone, he slowly goes insane If it were only this, the book would be fairly forgettable But it is also to some degree a portrait of the nation s soul though Richardson might have been uncomfortable with this reading deeply ambivalent about its relationship to the old world, with fears of inferiority culture cringe , ambitious but disgusted by ambition, greedy but egalitarian, and so on More importantly, Richardson begins the book in a fairly bland, realistic style, but as Mahony becomesandunstable, the strong third person narrator loses its grip We getstream of consciousness,free indirect discourse,ellipses and non sequiturs Richardson uses modernist tools, but uses them to depict Mahony s madness, or the way he appears to his young son Whenever we re back with Mahony s sane and long suffering wife, Mary, the narrator is strong But that madness at the end returns us to the grotesque proem at the mine s face the nation,or less founded on this telling on the receipts of the gold rush, can t escape the madness that was present at that foundation This is the history that gave us modernism, and you can t help but feel nostalgic, at the end, for the cliches and clunkiness of the book s opening But, as Mahony learns twice , you can t just go back home as if nothing has happened

  3. Kim Kim says:

    I read this book shortly after the birth of my second child who turns 29 in about six weeks time It was on the syllabus for a university course I was doing at the time My enduring memory is sitting in bed at 2.00 am, reading while feeding the baby, with my tears falling onto his head And then, continuing to read, well after the baby was asleep again, because I couldn t put it down An epic book.

  4. Angela Meyer Angela Meyer says:

    It s about the life of the restless Richard Mahony, from the Ballarat goldfields in the 1850s, via many adventures in Australia and abroad, to the latter part of the nineteenth century It s also a stunning portrait of a marriage, and an incredibly detailed account of colonial Australia Ballarat, Melbourne, the bush and the seaside.Reading it was one of the most fulfilling literary experiences I ve ever had This is mainly due to the character of Richard Mahony and his self induced tribulations It s about the life of the restless Richard Mahony, from the Ballarat goldfields in the 1850s, via many adventures in Australia and abroad, to the latter part of the nineteenth century It s also a stunning portrait of a marriage, and an incredibly detailed account of colonial Australia Ballarat, Melbourne, the bush and the seaside.Reading it was one of the most fulfilling literary experiences I ve ever had This is mainly due to the character of Richard Mahony and his self induced tribulations, and the intimate details of his marriage to Polly later known as Mary But it is also due to the historical aspects Mahony provides complete immersion in the experience of the past, through the eyes of just a few characters It s also an incredibly compassionate novel I only read afterwards that the character of Mahony was partly inspired by Richardson s father, and that just broke my heart all over again.The novel is so large that the characters becomethan complex, they become real The style is naturalistic, and the characters mental states are given as much attention as the surrounding landscape I found myself exasperated at Richard as Mary is , for his impractical flightiness, but at the same time I was so fond and forgiving of him And I related at times to his need for peace, quiet to not be bothered and then sided with him, too, in his annoyance at Mary s complete rationality The Mahonys are truly both kind hearted Mary charitable with her being and her space, to her friends Mahony a gentle doctor who hesitates to chase up bills, and who often rethinks his first, rash opinions of people but they also are at times hateful, frayed, even cruel Mahony is a terrible listener, and unable to adapt to colonial attitudes holding onto notions of gentlemanliness without realising it sometimes makes him a laughing stock But then When they go to England he reacts to their snobbishness You think it will change him Mary slowly becomes perceptive to Richard s foibles particularly the ones that get them into trouble and becomes stronger, and less materially motivated At the beginning you can see how well they match it centres around their kindnesses, they way they attempt to perceive the good in others though Mary soon learns that sometimes Richard will maintain a grudge Mary islikely to see the good and that is where she is kind, whereas Richard will crumble when faced with the weak Richardson exquisitely renders a long term relationship the way they misinterpret each other and begin to keep secrets, the way they manage each other, sometimes fear each other The novel is an incredible, humble, love story.Each revelation of character comes about through sections of the novel that are book length That makes it sound dreary, but it s not There are seeds planted sometimes in conversations with other characters , events foreshadowed When you begin reading it, you think it is all about the goldfields, and the men and it is But then Polly Mary and a new cast of characters come along Way, way down the line there are windfalls and travel and children and tragedy Each event is, as mentioned, a book of its own, so I can only be vague here The whole that these events add up to is so revealing As an Australian, too Though I think this holds up against European novels set in the 19th Century, is in fact muchaccessible than many of them I had, for example, never thought very much about the way the gold rush messed up the class system for those who clung to it, fresh from the old country, and what that meant, how confusing it could be for them More generally there is so much to learn and so much colour in regards to colonial Australia and the foundation of Victoria.I want to talk about Richard though I really cannot possibly capture him He is self absorbed, he is manic at times bursting with excitement for an idea, mainly a change and then he sinks into deep depressions He is over sensitive How strange Richard was how difficult First, to be able to forget all about how things stood with him, and then to be twice as upset as other people He is definitely fickle, an unpractical old dreamer as Mary thinks of him at one stage He is paranoid and nervous,so as he gets older He loves isolation, but becomes bored of that too and surprises Mary and the reader with bouts of socialising He is a skilled doctor, he is curious a great reader, at one point becoming obsessed with spiritualism He believed and would continue to believe it impossible wholly to account for life and its phenomena in terms of physiology, chemistry, physics He is not humourless but his sensitivity sometimes gets in the way He is sometimes confused He is embarrassing to his son, Cuffy Cuffy is such a surprising and wonderful voice added to the novel in later parts Cuffy allows the reader to see the relationship of his parents, the places they live, their life and his father from a different angle The way Richardson writes him captures the wonder and confusion and temper of childhood.I ll share one longer extract which is revealing of Richard After a description of travel and all of its difficulties, this is what follows Yes there was always something He never let himself have any real peace or enjoyment Or so thought Mary at the time It was not till afterwards, when he fell to re living his travels in memory, that she learned how great was the pleasure he had got out of them Inconveniences and annoyances were by then sunk below the horizon Above, remained visions of white cities, and slender towers, and vine clad hills of olive groves bedded in violets fine music heard in opera and oratorio coffee drinking in shady gardens on the banks of a lake orchards of pink almond blossom massed against the misty blue of far mountain valleys This gives you an idea of the contradictions within, and the changeability of Richard, and how he values having experienced different things no matter how troublesome at the time It also gives you an idea of the rhythm in the prose, and the humour in the novel, too It is not a solemn affair, even tragic circumstances are often given fresh views ie by Cuffy, the son.Highly, highly recommended

  5. Jennifer Jennifer says:

    Fantastic epic of what it means to be human, by following the life of a man and a marriage, with all the foibles of humanity and love and weakness and fear, but the memory is love A rereading of a favourite.

  6. Bryn Hammond Bryn Hammond says:

    A soul s slow, slow descent I remember the trauma.

  7. Leonie Leonie says:

    Expecting from the title for this to be the story of someone with a lot of ups and downs in their lives, and not knowing much else about it, I was a little surprised to meet Richard Mahony He is not at first glance a tumultuous figure but a rather dour, cautious figure who has trouble connecting with the world He begins as a shopkeeper but spends much of the novel practising as a doctor, though there are also periods of independent wealth He broods in an uncharismatic, touchy way, left out of Expecting from the title for this to be the story of someone with a lot of ups and downs in their lives, and not knowing much else about it, I was a little surprised to meet Richard Mahony He is not at first glance a tumultuous figure but a rather dour, cautious figure who has trouble connecting with the world He begins as a shopkeeper but spends much of the novel practising as a doctor, though there are also periods of independent wealth He broods in an uncharismatic, touchy way, left out of the world s bonhomie because of his inability to consistently produce or appreciate it, but envying its warmth He is much less earthbound anderratic than he at first appears however,of an idealist, occasionally hyper social and periodically subject to an irresistible urge to destroy his present life and start again.He has one friend who means a lot to him, and through this friend he meets Mary, who becomes his wife when she is only 16 and he is 12 years older At this stage in their lives they both have a good deal of idealism in their make up their high ethical standards will continue to be the one thing they have in common At the beginning the differences in their world views seems insignificant, not least because Mary is very young All of Richard s energies are bound up with the inner world He pursues the great intellectual questions and is a classic case of caring about injustice while being unable to stand people in the flesh His interest in spiritualism is a trial for his wife and she doesn t understand his love of animals He doesn t understand and certainly can t share her patience with real people which comes from both love and loyalty for friends and family and pragmatism, her ability to make useful connections for him if only he will play his part Richardson does very well at making us understand the tug at both ends, each straining for nourishment in opposite directions We can enter into each character s frustrations with the other at times Occasionally, however, I felt that Richardson hit a false note with Mary s characterisation in order to achieve this Generally her kindness and ability to relate to others is emphasised, except when Richardson wants to make too clear a dichotomy between her kind of perceptions and Richard s and she suddenly fails in kindness due to her lack of ability to perceive the nature of others problems I find it hard to buy the idea that kindness can exist without emotional intelligence and in general Mary s kindness is clearly shown not to be confined to material problems and their solutions.The need for companionship and the question of what companionship consists of is one of the novel s themes True understanding and sharing of what is most individual or just the simple solidarity and continuing presence of married life One of the things I liked most about this book is its treatment of marriage as something that creates a partnership like a separate entity from either of them Romance might have been the lure to enter into the relationship at the beginning but has very little to do with the substance of it And in the end the fact of having spent so much time together isimportant than whether it was ever really the best decision to do so.This book is Introversion The Three Act Tragedy and I found it horribly convincing For me, this passage, which comes at the crux of Richard s desperation, is the climax of this theme For there had been no real love in him never a feeler thrown out to his fellow men Such sympathy as he felt, he had been too backward to show had given of it only in thought, and from afar Pride, again oh rightly was a pride like his reckoned among the seven capital sins For what WAS it, but an iron determination to live untouched and untrammelledto preserve one s liberty, of body and of mind, at the expense of all human sentiment To be sufficient unto oneself, asking neither help nor regard, and spending none A fierce, Lucifer like inhibition Yes, thisbutbesides Pride also meant the shuddering withdrawal of oneself, because of a rawnessa skinlessnesson which the touch of any rough hand could cause agony even the chance contacts of everyday prove a source of exquisite discomfort.It s one of those books which makes you wonder why it isn t better known as one of the Great Books even though you feel a little protective about of it because really you know why it isn t one of the Great Books even though it has Greatness within it Partly it might be that Richard s tragedy is a little too specific I related to enough of it to be unsure how universal it was Mostly though because of the accumulation of domestic detail immense quantities of parties given and home improvements and births, deaths and marriages in their family circle I have a high tolerance for this stuff and also I thought it conveyed the sense of time it s important for this book to convey the impression that it contains the sum of Richard and Mary s lives But I can see how others might be defeated

  8. John Purcell John Purcell says:

    Beyond brilliant Without peer.

  9. Sammy Sammy says:

    Richardson was the best Australian writer of her generation, there s no doubt about it Of course, in a country where many people did not have the luxury of making a career as writing, due to class, race, and even despite Richardson s success gender, we must remember all those coulda beens who were deposed by the iron first of majority rule But that s another story entirely Born in 1870, Richardson s was really only the third generation of native born colonial Australians The first gen Richardson was the best Australian writer of her generation, there s no doubt about it Of course, in a country where many people did not have the luxury of making a career as writing, due to class, race, and even despite Richardson s success gender, we must remember all those coulda beens who were deposed by the iron first of majority rule But that s another story entirely Born in 1870, Richardson s was really only the third generation of native born colonial Australians The first generation, that of William Charles Wentworth was a small one, the children of military officers and convicts, who spenttime grappling with everyday realities and the question of what the colony meant than creating art The second generation was led artistically by Marcus Clarke, the only truly significant writer of the bunch Richardson s life coincided with the defining moments of Australian nationalism, from the Federation of the States to WWI It would be the generation that followed Richardson which would give us luminaries like Xavier Herbert, Martin Boyd, Eleanor Dark, and Christina Stead All of which is to say, she is the closest we have to some of the great writers of the late Victorian era, like George Eliot, with something of the early modernists too This trilogy of novels is somehow both dense and tightly written, sprawling but focused It s an emotional barrage that takes a while to gain a power over the reader, but once it does, my gosh Each of three parts has its own strengths Australia Felix is the most engaging of the three, focusing on thriving times in the colony of Victoria, and the life of the young Richard The Road Home isponderous, being centered around his disillusionment and journeys from Australia to England, and back again But it conveys a great sense of atmosphere and control in its writing Lastly, Ultima Thule s strength is in its novelistic force, a muchinternal experience than the previous two, and apsychologically penetrating piece of writing.Great stuff

  10. Kelly Kelly says:

    This was a difficult one to rate For most of the book nearly 90% of it, according to my Kindle I was ready to give up at any moment I was going to give it a two star rating Not one star, because even in the depths of its interminably meandering middle, it had clear literary merit But god, it was so BORING In the chronicle of the lives of Richard and Mary Mahony, it felt as though the author left not a single day undescribed And then, towards the end, it suddenly became not only interesti This was a difficult one to rate For most of the book nearly 90% of it, according to my Kindle I was ready to give up at any moment I was going to give it a two star rating Not one star, because even in the depths of its interminably meandering middle, it had clear literary merit But god, it was so BORING In the chronicle of the lives of Richard and Mary Mahony, it felt as though the author left not a single day undescribed And then, towards the end, it suddenly became not only interesting but heart rending The last ten percent is beautiful and sad, an incredible feat of naturalistic writing.Is it worth slogging through seven hundred pages of tedium to get to this stunning finish I haven t quite made up my mind yet.I ve also written a review of this book on my blog, Around the World in 2000 Books

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