The Middle Ages Kindle Ú The Middle Epub /

The Middle Ages Kindle Ú The Middle Epub /

The Middle Ages ❰Reading❯ ➷ The Middle Ages Author Morris Bishop – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk In this single indispensable volume, one of America s ranking scholars combines a life s work of research and teaching with the art of lively narration Both authoriatative and beautifully told, THE MI In this single indispensable volume, one of America s ranking scholars combines a life s work of research and teaching with the art of lively narration Both authoriatative and beautifully told, The Middle Ages is the full story of the thousand years between the fall of The Middle Epub / Rome and the Renaissance a time that saw the rise of kings and emperors, the flowering of knighthood, the development of Europe, the increasing power of the Church, and the advent of the middle class With exceptional grace and wit, Morris Bishop vividly reconstructs this distinctive era of European history in a work that will inform and delight scholars and general readers alike.


About the Author: Morris Bishop

Is a well known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Middle Ages book, this is one of the most wanted Morris Bishop author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “The Middle Ages

  1. LeAnn LeAnn says:

    Morris Bishop s highly readable survey of The Middle Ages condenses a thousand years of history often dismissed for its darkness, violence, and superstition and incorrectly portrayed as an unfortunate chasm between the glory of ancient times and the Renaissance that drew on a renewed interest in the classics.Bishop s survey, unlike Asimov s histories, covers the period thematically rather than chronologically For a span of time that includes the Dark Ages when much of what was written was eithe Morris Bishop s highly readable survey of The Middle Ages condenses a thousand years of history often dismissed for its darkness, violence, and superstition and incorrectly portrayed as an unfortunate chasm between the glory of ancient times and the Renaissance that drew on a renewed interest in the classics.Bishop s survey, unlike Asimov s histories, covers the period thematically rather than chronologically For a span of time that includes the Dark Ages when much of what was written was either lost or barely preserved, this approach works rather well Ten chapters cover familiar medieval topics such as Knights in Battle, The Noble s Life, An Age of Faith, and The Artists Legacy Less familiar topics to me, anyway included Towns and Trade, The Life of Labor, and The Life of Thought.Perhaps some of the most surprising history of the Middle Ages is the development of capitalism and commerce and the rise of towns, which greatly promoted the common welfare, including the privilege of self government purchased from money strapped nobles Trade guilds are early unions Towns offered freedom to serfs in exchange for their employment Bishop declares that the Middle Ages ended by bequeathing modern timesthan it had received itself, a rather astonishing claim unless the reader allows for his others that the Middle Ages accomplished much in terms of art, architecture, literature, learning, and wisdom


  2. Greg Strandberg Greg Strandberg says:

    Do you want to know what happened from about 300 AD to around 1000 or so Then this book gives you good, solid chapters that make sense.We had it for our Medieval European history course in university, and it was pretty good I read it a few times in that regard, as you do when you read the same chapter a few times that week.I d actually like to read this again, because we all know how in one ear and out the other college books can be.


  3. Ben Ben says:

    Like your British grandfather telling stories by the fire There are no notes or references, so who knows how accurate this is, but Bishop s a good storyteller.


  4. Lauren Albert Lauren Albert says:

    A very readable introduction to the period It s definitely dated, but not so much as to take away its value as a beginning book.


  5. Hayward Chan Hayward Chan says:

    Before buying this book, set your expectation straight it isn t an event driven history book with details about every war and political change It s about life and the state of the art throughout the middle ages Historical events are included only if they help making the point.Knowing that it is an old book, I find it surprising readable Granted, I need to look up the dictionary every now and then English is my second language and I am not a liberal arts major , but the narrative is fluent a Before buying this book, set your expectation straight it isn t an event driven history book with details about every war and political change It s about life and the state of the art throughout the middle ages Historical events are included only if they help making the point.Knowing that it is an old book, I find it surprising readable Granted, I need to look up the dictionary every now and then English is my second language and I am not a liberal arts major , but the narrative is fluent and concise I wish there arepictures and maps I need to keep myself online to look up the mentioned places every now and then, but Bishop definitely does a great job in describing in words I am completely ignorant of the middle age history After reading the book, even though I still don t know all the popes, wars and dynasties in detail, I have a pretty firm grasp of how people live and think in the middle ages


  6. Kiwi Begs2Differ ✎ Kiwi Begs2Differ ✎ says:

    I really enjoyed this book, I thought it was well organised The first couple of chapters are dedicated to the main historical events, divided into early period and high late middle ages The following chapters are dedicated to specific topics the hierarchical structure of feudal society, war, chivalry, religion, trade, education, literature, drama, sciences and the arts This book may not appeal to serious scholars it is lacking even the basic references to sources, no notes are provided, etc I really enjoyed this book, I thought it was well organised The first couple of chapters are dedicated to the main historical events, divided into early period and high late middle ages The following chapters are dedicated to specific topics the hierarchical structure of feudal society, war, chivalry, religion, trade, education, literature, drama, sciences and the arts This book may not appeal to serious scholars it is lacking even the basic references to sources, no notes are provided, etc and I noticed a couple of mistakes and some wide generalization e.g regarding local governance and the arts Overall, however, it is a well written, informative and very enjoyable introduction to the middle ages period in Europe Recommended


  7. Cooper Cooper says:

    Oh, where to start Perhaps with the subtitle that I, 23 pages in and already consumed with righteous indignation, scribbled upon this book s cover Bigoted Nursery Tales Now, lest I appear to be a nefarious defacer of books, it must be noted that I have never before touched my pen to a book cover Until that night of July 1st, every bit of marginalia upon my book pages had been written with the most scrupulous care And while margin notes do not, in my opinion, demand the rigorous grammatical Oh, where to start Perhaps with the subtitle that I, 23 pages in and already consumed with righteous indignation, scribbled upon this book s cover Bigoted Nursery Tales Now, lest I appear to be a nefarious defacer of books, it must be noted that I have never before touched my pen to a book cover Until that night of July 1st, every bit of marginalia upon my book pages had been written with the most scrupulous care And while margin notes do not, in my opinion, demand the rigorous grammatical and stylistic standards that I apply to my formal writing, I do try However, by page 17 I had made the pleasing discovery that writing in capital letters releases frustration By page 27, I was making notes such as UH and IF HE BREAKS THE FOURTH WALL ONE MORE TIME I SWEAR TO PROMETHEUS BOUND S ZEUS Eventually, abbreviations, borderline profanity, and juvenile slang crisscrossed the pages In contrast, a note upon page 176 of my copy of Moby Dick I am currently using it as a palate cleanser reads this this is the true, accursed, communion Mind you, at 11 35 p.m on the 1st of July, 2020 B.C.E., I looked up this book with pleased anticipation After all, it had been highly recommended to me by a teacher who, among other things, spent her Aprils every year taking students through Plato, Augustine, and Dostoyevsky Of course, the book had also been described as an engaging read, so I wasn t expecting any sort of revolutionary scholarship, but I was expecting scholarship I kept an Abbasid Count as I went, or at least tried to Originally I had intended to count all of the completely ridiculous not to mention unverifiable details that were included by Mr Bishop before he made any reference to, you know, one of the two dominant Eurasian civilizations at the time other than refering to it as the Arab Empire By page 31, however, I had lost count, but I would like to note particularly egregious offenders as, perhaps, a sampling of what one can expect I now know the French for the nickname of Charlemange s mother, Big foot Bertha I also know the number of virgins who prayed working three shifts, mind you for Charlemagne s health 14 , the bread brought to England by the Saxons rye , and that bears teeth were used to polish parchment And, alas, the Abbasids never did make an appearance Oh, and Charlemagne s eyes were vivacious Interspersed with trivialities, generalities, unverifiable anecdotes, and the weird assumption that all Christians were always happy and all PAGANS AND BARBARIANS were always FIERCE AND SAVAGE AND LIONS AND BEARS AND TIGERS OH MY one can find preaching even anti communist hysteria, my friends, in a chapter supposedly about Abelard I was not surprised to find that Mr Bishop s grasp of theology and philosophy wonderfully illustrated in statements like logic gave people a new understanding based on faith, not to mention his attempt to explain nominalism and realism was even flimsier than his grasp of history But back to the preaching Aside from a strange need to differentiate secular and Christian society wherever it was convenient I take that back it is hardly strange, just unbefitting of a serious thinker , Mr Bishop is fond of reflecting on how Christianity and the wonderful Christians spread the spirit of God through the barbarian lands Unsuprisingly, this questionable faith trickles floods into his critical that s far too kind a word evaluation of everything else It is heresy, Mr Bishop informs us helpfully, to be somewhat doubtful as to whether the Trinity s assertion that three can be one and one can be three is quite logically sound One must not be a nominalist communist, children this is a paraphrase but an accurate one Eppur si muove, Mr Bishop Eppur si muove And while I am not normally one to nitpick the style of a nonfiction author, it is worth noting that Mr Bishop, in addition to forgetting any and all historical training that one imagines that he must have received, has forgotten the existence of and I kid you not One sentence every few pages conspicously missing a conjunction may, I suppose, be forgiven But if one were to only base one s knowlegde of English upon this book, one would imagine that that poor conjunction had gone the way of Charlemagne s vivacious eyes In general, stylistic flourishes do not become the nonfiction writer in all but the rarest of cases, and Mr Bishop is no Solzhenitsyn Nor is he a Gibbon, or even a Susan Wise Bauer As far as the content of this book goes, I must confess that, when the pompous high schooler who read the Spark Notes but still thinks they can wing the assignment language is removed an example being but with all the endings and forgettings, it was a time of obscure beginnings , there s little left to this book other than rank religious bigotry and preaching, race consciounness that can certainly be construed as racism, worse than poor historical scholarship, positive and negative superlative adjectivesat home in subpar fanfiction, and history written apparently with goals similar to those of the average tabloid writer In all, this book is 325 pages of damning evidence for anyone wishing to indict Mr Bishop for an intellect distinguished both by narrowness and what Oscar Wilde called the worst crime of all shallowness


  8. adrienne adrienne says:

    easily readable, but completely lacking footnotes references bibliography, even for the most simple of things like a king s birth date Where he uses quotations, he notes the person who supposedly made the statement, but not where he actually found the citation good for a beginner book or a pleasure read, but i could never recommend using this as a reference for anything serious it would rank, at absolute best, as a tertiary source given 3 stars because it is an enjoyable read, if one is l easily readable, but completely lacking footnotes references bibliography, even for the most simple of things like a king s birth date Where he uses quotations, he notes the person who supposedly made the statement, but not where he actually found the citation good for a beginner book or a pleasure read, but i could never recommend using this as a reference for anything serious it would rank, at absolute best, as a tertiary source given 3 stars because it is an enjoyable read, if one is looking for a non scholarly overview of the era


  9. Samantha S. Samantha S. says:

    If you are even remotely interested in the Middle Ages, this book is quite the find Bishop s writing is clear, accessible, detailed and very funny A solid primer on a strange age


  10. Tim Martin Tim Martin says:

    _The Middle Ages_ by Morris Bishop is an enjoyable and witty overview of the history, culture, and society of Medieval Europe The first chapter, The Long Dark, looks at the beginning of the medieval period, the author arguing that the Middle Ages should be seen as both a continuation of the language, institutions, and artistry of not only old Rome but also of cultures independent of it, such as that of the Franks and Saxons and a formation, the beginning of our modern world, the end of pagan _The Middle Ages_ by Morris Bishop is an enjoyable and witty overview of the history, culture, and society of Medieval Europe The first chapter, The Long Dark, looks at the beginning of the medieval period, the author arguing that the Middle Ages should be seen as both a continuation of the language, institutions, and artistry of not only old Rome but also of cultures independent of it, such as that of the Franks and Saxons and a formation, the beginning of our modern world, the end of pagan classical civilization Charlemagne is a major figure in this chapter his coronation as the first Roman emperor in the West inthan 300 years in the year 800 marked a major shift in power, from the East to the West, the development of a culture that was not a satellite of Byzantium but rather firmly European, and the very birth of European civilization.Chapter two focused on the history of the High Middle Ages, focusing in large part on the year 1000 as a major turning point, that despite Viking threats one could point to certain gains, to certain justifications for hope, as the West was in generally a better shape and the broad outline of the major modern states had begun to take form Technology continued to advance, with the advent of the spinning wheel, mechanical weight driven clock, compass, and fixed rudder Notable in the chapter is King Henry II who laid the foundations of English common law and the institution of limited monarchy.The next chapter focused on knights and the crusades Bishop noted that the crusades were the first wars fought for an ideal and that they were promoted with all the tools of the propagandist, among them atrocity stories, lies, and inflammatory speeches Also interesting was his coverage of Saladin the pet enemy of the West , the description of crusade battles Richard the Lion Hearted took Acre in 1191 with the help of a catapult known as Bad Neighbor , and why the crusades ultimately failed they did not correspond to any temporal aim, as Europe had no need for Jerusalem or Syria, and Europe would have benefitedfrom a stronger Byzantine Empire though the crusades achieved in fact quite the opposite.Chapter four focused on the life of the noble, on what in fact feudalism really was, the bloody nature of the family feuds of the nobles, the bundle of paradoxes that was the noble he could be both gallant and bloodthirsty, charitable and immoral , and many of the elements of their daily lives We learn for instance that window glass was rare for centuries and for long time was treated with great care, as Bishop tells of some nobles who removed and wrapped window glass before long journeys Throughout much of the Middle Ages pockets were unknown, blonde hair was much prized in Italy ladies spent a great deal of time bleaching it , hard soap was a luxury item and did not appear until the 12th century, and dinner guests were provided with spoons but had to bring their own knives forks were a rarity.Chapter five looked at Christianity, arguing that the church, in many senses, wasthan merely the patron of medieval culture, that it was medieval culture He argued that the pope s involvement in political affairs blunted church authority, laying the papacy open to mockery and shame by overuse of crusades and excommunication for temporal gains The coverage of the cult of relics was fascinating so morbid was this that Saint Romuald of Ravenna, visiting France, heard people propose he wasvaluable dead than alive and barely escaped The life of the monastery was well covered, as well as St Francis and the Franciscans, Dominic of Caleruega and the Dominicans, the Waldenses early evangelical, almost Protestant, Christians , and the Cathari dualistic heretics.Chapter six looked at towns and trade Interesting tidbits include the fact that the last name Walker comes from the cloth trade walkers stamped on cloth to shrink and compact it , that bankers first appeared in medieval trade fairs money changers or bankers got the name from the banks or benches that they laid out their coins , artisans kept virtually no stock in stores they worked only on orders , and our hook and ladder companies comes from the hooks supplied in medieval cities to pull burning thatch from roofs to the street.Chapter seven looked at the life of labor Bishop looked at how the manorial system functioned, the daily life of the peasant, leprosy, and the state of medieval medicine.The eighth chapter focused on the life of thought, the author examining how schools worked and what it was like to have been a student, the origins of medieval science and secular scholarship as scholars realized that the physical world was no mere ugly training camp for the soul but worthy of study in its own right , and famous medieval writers like Dante and Boccaccio.Chapter nine dealt with medieval art, architecture, and music Fascinating coverage of the evolution of building styles, the construction of cathedrals, the use of stained glass which told the stories of the Christian faith through colored sunshine , though Bishop felt the term stained glass was incorrect, as it was not stained with color but rather infused with it , the work and role of artisans in society, and the origins of musical notation developed during the eleventh century into our recognizably modern form, which was also when our notes were named ut, re, mi, fa, so, la from the opening syllables of the successive lines of a familiar hymn.The final chapter dealt with the end of the Middle Ages Major topics include papal conflicts such as the Babylonian Captivity and the Great Schism, the challenges posed by John Wycliffe and John Hus, the greatest calamity to befall the Western world the Black Death , the Hundred Years War a futile war,it achieved little except destruction, misery, and death , and Joan of Arc


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