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Paperback ↠ Lindbergh eBook Ú



10 thoughts on “Lindbergh

  1. Will Byrnes Will Byrnes says:

    A Scott Berg Image from his site The book is well deserving of its Pulitzer Lindbergh was one of the most interesting people of the 20th century and this book gives us a fly on the wall look at many critical parts of his life, the heroics of his early aviation triumphs, the horror of the kidnapping of his child, his elevation and victimization by the press I learned much that I did not know about Lindbergh, for instance that he helped design an early artificial heart, that he applied his a A Scott Berg Image from his site The book is well deserving of its Pulitzer Lindbergh was one of the most interesting people of the 20th century and this book gives us a fly on the wall look at many critical parts of his life, the heroics of his early aviation triumphs, the horror of the kidnapping of his child, his elevation and victimization by the press I learned much that I did not know about Lindbergh, for instance that he helped design an early artificial heart, that he applied his aviation expertise to revolutionize archaeology and that he operated as a spy for the USA while on visits to Germany and to the USSR There is muchin this large volume And there is much time allocated to his wife Ann, a fascinating person in her own right A great read, not only full of information, but engaging and enjoyable EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author s personal, Twitter, Instagram, and FB pages


  2. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    This book, the whole 31 hours of the audio version, was fascinating from the very start to the very end I was not once bored The spread of topics covered is amazing Surely you already know about Lindbergh s solo non stop transatlantic flight of 33 and 1 2 hours in 1927 and the deluge of media coverage that never abated for the rest of his life and of the kidnapping of his 20 month old son in 1932 Most probably you have heard mention of his possibly anti Semitic views All of this is covered This book, the whole 31 hours of the audio version, was fascinating from the very start to the very end I was not once bored The spread of topics covered is amazing Surely you already know about Lindbergh s solo non stop transatlantic flight of 33 and 1 2 hours in 1927 and the deluge of media coverage that never abated for the rest of his life and of the kidnapping of his 20 month old son in 1932 Most probably you have heard mention of his possibly anti Semitic views All of this is covered and much, much, muchThere is a thorough discussion of his anti Semitic statements There is his troubled relationship with his wife, author Anne Morrow Lindbergh Her extramarital relationships and his inability to EVER be at home Their respective writing careers, both his own and his wife s Not one of these issues is cut and dry To understand you need the details and you are given these details in a thorough but also captivating manner Humorous anecdotes too G ring had a pet lion that peed on his trousers Lindbergh s daughter, who later became an author in her own right, even as a child threw out priceless lines These are quoted You will laugh and laugh Lindbergh was a savant He wrote He philosophized He traveled and saw the world, the whole world Yes, he fought in the Second World War even after he had renounced his military title as colonel He shot down a Japanese pilot, advised MacArthur all without military rank or pay He wanted to do his part once America had joined the war His disputes with Roosevelt are detailed, starting from their disagreement on air mail contracts When he lived in France Lindbergh worked with the French Nobel Prize winning surgeon Dr Alexis Carrel He invented a glass perfusion pump making future heart surgeries possible He was a conservationist and an environmentalist So you think he was only the aviator who crossed the Atlantic in his little Spirit of St Louis winning the Orteig No That is simply the beginning of the story.All these topics are interestingly presented, and it is this that makes the book fun to read The little details are sometimes amazing, sometimes, heartrending, sometimes amusing At the end you know his personal traits, his strengths and weaknesses, not only of him but his wife and children too The book moves chronologically forward It covers his parents lives, his birth in 1902 Detroit and his death in 1974 Maui, Hawaii, of lymphoma He planned every detail of his funeral and burial Weird, to say the least This is all part of who he was He was despotic, could never sit still and had to control everyone and everything You get the good and the bad The family endorsed the writing of this biography and provided full documentation letters and diaries and interviews The book was written with their consent I wondered at times if perhaps the author s views were a bit too lenient, but let me state clearly, I do not find the book favorably biased I wished at times that some of the quotes were discussed and evaluatedthoroughly OK, that is what was said and there is documented proof, but how does the author interpret the facts I feel the author should haveclearly spoken of the rampant anti Semitism in the US and the world at this time and that most Americans were against intervention, i.e until Pearl Harbor This is why I found the book very, very good rather than simply amazing Tell me, how often do you read a book that never ever drags A word about the audiobook narration, by Lloyd James in one word superb He reads the lines slowly and steadily, pausing when appropriate, and giving you time to think THIS is how I like books to be read No theatrical stunts that is not necessary if the author s lines are fascinating Occasionally he swallows the last word of a sentence so you don t hear it properly WOW, this book is fascinating It is NEVER EVER boring I have read a littlethan half, I think.OK, Lindbergh buys the island Ile Iliec in Brittany on the Pink Granite Coast He says, I have never seen a place I want to live as much Do I agree Yes I loved the book even before he said this


  3. Matt Matt says:

    Celebrity in America is a fixation What do you need to do to be a celebrity Well, it ll help if your parents or husband is rich Fertility drugs plus multiple births almost assures you of a television show If that doesn t work, you can always willingly place yourself on a deserted island and engage in various frivolous challenges How did you become a celebrity in the old days Try getting into a monoplane, take off from New York, fly across the Atlantic, and land in Paris, doing something Celebrity in America is a fixation What do you need to do to be a celebrity Well, it ll help if your parents or husband is rich Fertility drugs plus multiple births almost assures you of a television show If that doesn t work, you can always willingly place yourself on a deserted island and engage in various frivolous challenges How did you become a celebrity in the old days Try getting into a monoplane, take off from New York, fly across the Atlantic, and land in Paris, doing something no one else had ever done and which several had died trying In the old days, you had to be a hero first What did you do when you were 25 Charles Augustus Lindbergh is known and defined for two things his famous 1927 solo flight in The Spirit of St Louis and his role with America First, an organization dedicated to keeping the United States out of World War II When I was very young, I read about Lindbergh the hero and adored him when I was still kind of young, I read about Lindbergh the anti Semite and hated him Now that I m not really that young, I decided I should read about his whole life, not just the high and low A Scott Berg s book is the only place to go It is a comprehensive, sweeping, informative one volume life of the Lone Eagle It is mostly shorn of analysis and attempts to stand without judgment, though it is impossible for any biographer not to take sides with his subject, at least a little If there is any theme to this Pulitzer Prize winning book, it is that of celebrity how it instantly changed 25 year old Lindbergh s life, taking him from relative unknown to the most famous man in the world feted, adored, honored, and paid handsomely Berg goes to great pains to show both the doors this opened, and the price he paid For as Berg astutely notes, as long as Lindbergh was a blank slate, everyone loved him without hesitation But this is America, and we like to build you up, tear you down, let you wallow, and if you re still alive, give you a second act As soon as Lindbergh started to take positions on his work, his privacy, his politics he made enemies, a lot of them Until reading this book, I never knew how much I hated TMZ or Us Weekly For as much as Lindbergh gained, and he gained a lot millions of dollars, the ability to travel the whole world, the freedom to do whatever he wanted he lost almost as much Berg begins Lindbergh s story with his Swedish forebears, his birth in Michigan, and his troubled early life in Little Falls, Minnesota, with a politician father and bipolar mother What is striking of Lindbergh s early life is how unremarkable he is He wasn t successful in school, he had a tumultuous family life, he didn t know what he wanted for himself, and he had a serious case of self imposed sexual repression I suppose Garrison Keillor would blame the Swedish blood in his veins After leaving school, Lindbergh started flight school, when the school promptly closed He took up barnstorming, learned to fly, and survived four emergency parachute drops He flew a mail route stationed out of Lambert Field, in St Louis Then came the Contest the first non stop flight across the Atlantic Lindbergh did it, of course, but what is amazing is how small a part of his life that was It was the turning point of a fascinating epic In Berg s telling, the famous flight takes up less than half a chapter, and is probably one of the least interesting parts of the book Indeed, Lindbergh is a child of fortune He was the first to do this task, but just barely Others accomplished the feat soon after It just so happened he was a little quicker And it just so happened that he was impossibly handsome, with that dimpled chin and that curly hair Fame followed And marriage He wed a diplomat s daughter the talented Anne Morrow Then comes tragedy, and its so Shakespearean you think it s fiction There are two chapters dedicated to Bruno Richard Hauptman and the Crime of the Century, a chilling tale that starts with an empty baby s crib and ends in the electric chair From there, Lindbergh leaves America for Europe to recapture his privacy He becomes a civilian shuttle diplomat, and unfortunately begins to fawn over Nazi Germany there is a darkly comic scene where Goering is showing Lindbergh his tiger, and the tiger urinates on Goering s white pants Berg spends a good deal of time on Lindbergh s America First speeches This was the only time in the book I felt like Berg was taking sides He bends over backwards to rehabilitate Lindbergh s reputation during this period Really, though, the rehabilitation is necessary I think it s a little simplistic to tar Lindy as an anti Semite just because he wanted to keep America out of war Of course, there was good evidence, even in the 30 s, that Germany was persecuting the Jews But before you get on your high horse and judge Lindbergh, I got to ask what did you do during Bosnia, Rwanda, and Darfur Exactly We have 21st century, 24 hour a day communications, and we ve ignored three genocides in 20 years It s forgivable that Lindbergh wouldn t have known the full extent of the Nazis misdeeds, or might ve been unable to believe it I guess when it comes to the Holocaust, all rational discussion goes out the window When Pearl Harbor was bombed, Lindbergh tried to serve his country, but FDR blacklisted him from military service and almost all civilian contractors Eventually, Lindy went to the South Pacific as a civilian consultant, illegally flew over 50 bombing missions, and shot down a Japanese plane Lindbergh did many other amazing things He was instrumental in helping Dr Robert Goddard start the American Rocket program He was fascinated with medical science and helped develop an artificial heart He won the Medal of Honor Berg annoying refers to it as the Congressional Medal of Honor, which is incorrect and the Pulitzer Prize In his later life he became a devoted conservationist He was an iconoclast demanding of his children meticulous in his personal life untethered and always on the move There are many admirable traits, along with many unflattering ones He was stubborn, refused to back down, and refused to rethink long held positions He could be hard and unfeeling towards his wife, show flashes of great temper, and lacked the ability to understand that while he was great thrust up from the masses by luck, skill, and the alignment of the stars others were just normal.Oddly, the most thrilling part of this book is the story of Lindbergh and Anne s marriage In the front part of the book, I was starting to wonder if Berg was simply going to ignore this dark facet to Lindy s life however, by the last third, it took center stage Anne was a supremely talented and bestselling author However, she was also fragile, pensive, and shy, and her belligerent, demanding, oft immature husband came close to destroying her As Berg notes, Lindbergh set the tone of the marriage When he wanted to leave for parts uncharted, he left, while Anne stayed behind with the children When Lindbergh wanted to be home, Anne had to wait on him hand and foot he even threatened to shoot the phone when she attempted to answer it I became so sickened with his behavior that I actually cheered when Anne finally had an affair you will too for all his bravery, foresight, and achievements, Lindbergh was a grade A jerk In the end, though, Anne chose to stick with him.Lindbergh died of cancer in his 70s Knowing the end was coming, he planned it down to the last detail, even plotting out a way that he could be buried without embalming under Hawaii law, he had to be in the ground within 8 hours of death Whatever else you think of the guy, and I have strongly conflicting thoughts about him, he faced the end likewell, like someone who d been taunting death his whole life Lindbergh praised the doctors for having done a magnificent job, but he realized they were fighting a losing battle he did not want to chance another 36 hours, which might bring enough deterioration to prevent his going to Hawaii at all The doctor accused the patient of turning his back on medical science Lindbergh replied that science had done all it could, that the problem was no longer medical but philosophical Berg is a great synthesizer of information He uses a lot of primary sources and both Lindbergh and Anne were prolific writers so the story often comes in their own words, with great insight into their minds Of Lindbergh and Anne, I felt I knew Anne better Lindbergh always remains at an arm s length This isn t Berg s fault Lindbergh was a stoic and never partook of a deep internal dialogue or if he did, he never wrote about it Anne, on the other hand, was all feeling, so the best way to understand Lindbergh is to understand Anne, and Lindbergh s impact on her Berg steps back and does a good job of letting his story tell itself He s gathered the various parts and put them in their proper place he does not inject himself with flowery prose or analysis Fittingly, it is Anne, when writing about that moment when her future husband landed his plane in Paris, who delivers the great epitaph to Charles Lindbergh s life There is something in the directness simplicity innocence of that boy arriving after that terrific flight completely unaware of the world interest the wild crowds below The rush of the crowds to the plane is symbolic of life rushing at him a new life new responsibilities he was completely unaware of unprepared for I feel for him mingled excitement apprehension a little what one feels when a child is born you look at his fresh untouchedlittle face know that he will meet joy but sorrow too struggle pain frustration


  4. Arminius Arminius says:

    Lindbergh by A Scott Berg begins with Charles A Lindbergh s very interesting parents His father was a very respectful and successful lawyer in Minnesota who became a congressman and eventually a nomad His mother was an educated school teacher from Detroit whose father was a controversial dentist at the time He had a shop where he would invent numerous machines to work on teeth Young Charles would visit and his grandfather would teach him to work with his various tools This sparked an inte Lindbergh by A Scott Berg begins with Charles A Lindbergh s very interesting parents His father was a very respectful and successful lawyer in Minnesota who became a congressman and eventually a nomad His mother was an educated school teacher from Detroit whose father was a controversial dentist at the time He had a shop where he would invent numerous machines to work on teeth Young Charles would visit and his grandfather would teach him to work with his various tools This sparked an interest in Charles in mechanics Charles was a very shy boy growing up He had a doting mother and often absent father He was known to have few friends and enjoyed rafting and his pets He attended college for a year before he flunked out but became interested in air planes He drove his motorcycle to Nebraska where there was a place where one could learn to fly planes He flew for a while then joined the Army Air Corps where he honed his skills He joined a Flying Circus Act where he performed stunts When the Post Office decided to use planes to transport mail, businesses to support it popped up soon afterwards Robinson Aircraft, one of those businesses, offered Lindbergh a job as its chief pilot for its Chicago to St Louis run For Robinson he surveyed routes and planned landing and emergency fields At the time a lucrative 25,000 prize named the Orteig Prize would be awarded to the first pilot that flew nonstop between New York and Paris Lindbergh knew he was the man to do it So he went around the St Louis area business men and gathered funding for an airplane to be built for his attempted trip Lindbergh raised the necessary funding and had a plane built to support one person He was smart enough to figure out how much weight the plane must hold in order to make the cross Atlantic trip He calculated how much fuel the plane could carry as well as the amount of food and water he must have He strived to use the least amount of weight possible He needed enough fuel to get across the ocean It would be dangerous if he did not have enough fuel to make it but almost as dangerous if he had too much fuel because that could weigh the plane down A second danger was if he lost his direction he would surely run out of fuel Pilots in the 1920 s used to follow railroad tracks to keep them in the correct direction Lindbergh had a superb ability to know where he was going using ocean landmarks like icebergs.All things went as planned He arrived in Paris to world wide applause He became the most famous person in the world for accomplishing this incredible feat He was welcomed with honors and parades in France He was invited to England and Germany where he received a medal form Adolph Hitler for his gallant accomplishment He was asked by most European countries to inspect their beginning air forces He came home to America to a hero s welcome He was asked to oversea developing Airlines such as PAN AM He sat on boards for most Air Transportation companies These companies gave him generous compensation for doing so He was feted by a lot of politicians and wealthy individuals He was asked to give speeches for numerous organizations One such invitation took him to the house of America s Mexican ambassador Dwight Morrow Morrow was an extremely wealthy individual coming from the JP Morgan banking dynasty to the prestigious job as the Ambassador to Mexico Charles was asked to stay with the Morrows for a few days This is where Morrow s daughter Anne met Charles and eventually became infatuated with his good looks and charismatic charm After another visit to with the Morrows, Charles asked Anne on a date They fell in love and married.He took Anne on numerous flights where she learned to co polite air planes They traveled all over the world These adventures would fuel some of her future books But, in a odd twist, Charles adventurous nature would never end and cause strain in their marriage due to Charles long bouts of home life absenteeism.Their first child was kidnapped He most likely died in the kidnapping The corresponding trial would become the Crime of the Century The rest that I will say about it is that the kidnapping of their baby is exhaustively discussed.After the trial things started to look up for the Lindbergh s until WWII started in Europe Charles who had long praised the German Luftwaffe as the world s best Air Force also vehemently protested America participating in WWII As President Roosevelt s popularity increased and after the bombing of Pearl Harbor Charles s opinions became very unpopular The President then sent the dogs after him He sent his aid Harold Ickes on the attack attempting to discredit Lindbergh in radio and newspaper appearances Charles fought back with speeches This strategy hurt him Parts of his very good speeches would be manipulated by Roosevelt cronies For example, in a speech, he blamed capitalists looking to make money and the Jewish controlled media for starting the war fever As a result, new attacks came at him from all over as being an anti Semite as well as a traitor Neither of which he was Nonetheless, he became very unpopular In fact, once the war started he volunteered to fight even though he was already in his forties However, President Roosevelt did not allow it But when the President died, the new President Truman allowed Charles to help the Allies by appointing him as a civilian trainer in the Pacific While training Army pilots, he dazzled the most experienced pilots with his piloting skills He even went on mission with them and shot down an enemy plane.After the war, his reputation rebounded due to his war time participation and the publishing of his Pulitzer Prize winning book The Spirit of St Louis He described in detail how he crossed the Atlantic by himself with astonishing clarity.With his resulting rebounded reputation he was offered one event and ceremony attendance after another He routinely turned down most offers but returned interesting individually addressed refusal letters For example, when a Girl Scout local asked him if they could use his name for the naming of their troupe he replied that organizations should not use a living person to name itself after.At this time he also continued his worldwide travels attempting to save any endangered species or natural habitat he could find from the Green Turtle in the Indian Ocean to writing General Westland in Vietnam and getting him to issue orders to prevent American servicemen from sending ivory back to the U.S He would visit tribes in the wild jungles of Indonesia and live with them for days at a time.The book details all these activities as well as his wife Ann s prolific writing career But in an extremely detailed way the author described Lindbergh s last days which, at least for me, were kind of sad However, there is so much in this book about a man with a remarkably adventurous life that I would rank this book as also a remarkably adventurous book


  5. Scott Foshee Scott Foshee says:

    Well Written Profile of a Brilliant yet Disturbing Man, Probably Due For an UpdateA Scott Berg does a good job in Lindbergh It is interesting, informative, and keeps you turning the pages He was granted access to sources by the Lindbergh family, including original access to the diaries of Anne Morrow Lindbergh This access helps the story in that it fills in much of the blanks of the life of the intensely private Charles Lindbergh, but it may also hurt in retaining the objectivity in some ins Well Written Profile of a Brilliant yet Disturbing Man, Probably Due For an UpdateA Scott Berg does a good job in Lindbergh It is interesting, informative, and keeps you turning the pages He was granted access to sources by the Lindbergh family, including original access to the diaries of Anne Morrow Lindbergh This access helps the story in that it fills in much of the blanks of the life of the intensely private Charles Lindbergh, but it may also hurt in retaining the objectivity in some instances Lindbergh comes across as a successful but very strange man It bothers me that Charles and Anne spend so much time away from their children, especially their second son Jon right after the Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping episode where their first son was killed They spend months away from newborn Jon, flying to Greenland, Europe, Africa and South America before returning to him There is also a particularly disturbing episode where he insists that their infant son be left in a cage on the roof in the cold weather to toughen him up Lindbergh is portrayed as hard driving but not having much of a personality This might be because of his intense desire to hide his private life from the public eye He was one of the first worldwide celebrities who had to cope with the invasion and distortions by the press He is cold and dictatorial to his family when rarely home He travels constantly, circling the world several times a year into his 70s working for various aircraft concerns and environmental causes.Lindbergh s scientific work, especially in developing machines to keep human organs alive for transplantation, was very interesting and was something I think most do not know about him The side of him engaged in scientific endeavors is all theimpressive considering his limited formal education Also, I did not know about his father s political career, which enabled Charles to spend time among the halls of power in Washington D.C as a youth The America First section dragged a bit, I thought It is easy to look back on WWII and think our involvement was inevitable, but that was not necessarily the thinking of everyone at the time Berg does a good job here dissecting Lindbergh s speeches and writings to show the line he walked between patriot and perceived Nazi sympathizer and accused anti Semite It also highlights how the press and popular sentiment can skew perception for decades to come, whether something is true or not Lindbergh visited and was decorated by numerous countries because of his fame, including Nazi Germany in the 1930 s He reported on the military strength of Germany at the time, and lobbied through the America First organization to keep the U.S out ofdestructive European wars For these efforts and others he was perceived by many at the time to be a Nazi sympathizer In explaining Lindbergh s controversial public positions prior to WWII, I wonder if Berg may have skewed objectivity a bit in deference to the family.It must be tough to write a definitive biography of a public figure, because it seems as if things often keep coming to light many years later We know that Charles Lindbergh did a lot of fascinating things, but not necessarily why Is this because Lindbergh tried to be such a private person Why did he fly the Atlantic, other than the fact that he thought he could do it The story lacks emotion As I read it I began to wonderandif Lindbergh had Asperger s syndrome or some derivative of it After I finished the book I did some research and found out that some people suspect just that This is something not brought up at all in the book, which may be due to the fact that many symptoms of Asperger s have only been recognized in recent years In addition, since the volume was published in 1998 and won the Pulitzer Prize, DNA evidence has been uncovered that shows he had as many as 7 illegitimate children by three different European mistresses I think the book is probably due for an update


  6. Lance Carney Lance Carney says:

    When I started this biography, I knew Charles Lindbergh as the man who was the first to fly solo across the Atlantic and of the tragic kidnapping of his young son I had no idea he was co inventor of the artificial heart with Dr Carrel, an activist, an author The book is also a good study of the terrible weight of fame on a human being The author does not paint Lindbergh up on a pedestal, but shows his flaws, his incredible drive that takes its toll on his wife and childen Anne Morrow Lindbe When I started this biography, I knew Charles Lindbergh as the man who was the first to fly solo across the Atlantic and of the tragic kidnapping of his young son I had no idea he was co inventor of the artificial heart with Dr Carrel, an activist, an author The book is also a good study of the terrible weight of fame on a human being The author does not paint Lindbergh up on a pedestal, but shows his flaws, his incredible drive that takes its toll on his wife and childen Anne Morrow Lindbergh is also detailed, which is a plus because she was as interesting and almost as decorated as her husband Lindbergh was an excellent biography and a great read


  7. Teri Teri says:

    A very well written, detailed account of the life of Charles A Lindbergh from birth to death Everything is covered from the famous first flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St Louis to the Trial of the Century covering the kidnapping and murder of Charles and Anne s first son to his political and aeronautical endeavors and eventual fight with lymphoma The book not only covers his life from Lindbergh s own point of view, but from his wife Anne s as well According to the end notes, A A very well written, detailed account of the life of Charles A Lindbergh from birth to death Everything is covered from the famous first flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St Louis to the Trial of the Century covering the kidnapping and murder of Charles and Anne s first son to his political and aeronautical endeavors and eventual fight with lymphoma The book not only covers his life from Lindbergh s own point of view, but from his wife Anne s as well According to the end notes, Anne offered thousands of records and diary entries to the author as long as the story was about both Charles and Anne The author lived up to the promise The relationship was loving and strong at times, while distance and estranged at others I thought this was a wonderful biography without being so exhaustive and dry Lindbergh was quite a character and that certainly comes through There was a lot I did not know about Charles, from his time stationed in San Antonio in the Army my home to his time working with PanAm Well worth the read if you are in any way interested in aeronautics or just curious about the man who made that first important flight across the Atlantic


  8. Jack Schuffenhauer Jack Schuffenhauer says:

    An excellent book , which I enjoyed from beginning to the end Thank you for the book, Drew There is so much about his life and family I had no idea about, beyond his solo flight across the Atlantic to Paris in 1927, and the tragic death of his and his wife, Ann s, baby boy who was kidnapped and killed Lindbergh was a remarkable man and his story is well worth reading It was interesting to learn that he chose to be buried in Hawaii Just so much to learn


  9. Helga Cohen Helga Cohen says:

    This was a fascinating book about a compelling figure, aviator Charles Lindbergh, written by a very deserved Pulitzer Prize writer He writes with clarity a very definitive biography of a legendary, controversial and mesmerizing man and his wife I learned much about his life from his early childhood, his early heroic aviation successes, the kidnapping of his son, his anti war non intervention stance, and how the press treated him It was also fascinating to learn about his interests in science This was a fascinating book about a compelling figure, aviator Charles Lindbergh, written by a very deserved Pulitzer Prize writer He writes with clarity a very definitive biography of a legendary, controversial and mesmerizing man and his wife I learned much about his life from his early childhood, his early heroic aviation successes, the kidnapping of his son, his anti war non intervention stance, and how the press treated him It was also fascinating to learn about his interests in science and medicine and how he was involved in the early design of the artificial heart and medical research He spent his later years on advocacy of the environment and traveled the world in support of it He was a very complex figure We also learn a lot about his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, her life and her trials and her husbands neglect It was well worth reading I highly recommend this book


  10. Tony Tony says:

    This is a highly informative and generally enjoyable biography Berg manages to not only capture historical events, but also Lindbergh s personality and values Upon completion, the reader feels as if he knows not only what Lindbergh did, but also the man, himself On the negative side, Berg occasionally goes into too much detail This is especially true when it comes to Anne Lindbergh In fact, there is so much detail on Anne that this book could easily be called The Lindberghs While Anne is a This is a highly informative and generally enjoyable biography Berg manages to not only capture historical events, but also Lindbergh s personality and values Upon completion, the reader feels as if he knows not only what Lindbergh did, but also the man, himself On the negative side, Berg occasionally goes into too much detail This is especially true when it comes to Anne Lindbergh In fact, there is so much detail on Anne that this book could easily be called The Lindberghs While Anne is a genuinely interesting figure, including her biography here creates a rather bloated work Additionally, the author somewhat soft pedals Lindbergh s WWII era antisemitism


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Lindbergh ❮Read❯ ➹ Lindbergh ➼ Author A. Scott Berg – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk This is a most compelling story of a most significant life the most private of public figures finally revealed with a sweep and detail never before possible In the skilled hands of A Scott Berg, this This is a most compelling story of a most significant life the most private of public figures finally revealed with a sweep and detail never before possible In the skilled hands of A Scott Berg, this is at once Lindbergh the hero and Lindbergh the manAwarded thePulitzer Prize for BiographyFrom one of America s most acclaimed biographers comes the definitive account of the life of one of the nation s most legendary, controversial, and enigmatic figures aviator Charles A Lindbergh.