Hardcover ↠ Grant Kindle Ú

Hardcover ↠ Grant Kindle Ú



10 thoughts on “Grant

  1. Tony Tony says:

    A mere ten years ago this would have been my Book of the Year But I m a different reader now Not necessarily a better or smarter reader, just different So I pause when I read a sentence like As ever, his whole physiology sprang into action. Where is the editor to ask Ron, do you really mean his whole physiology Because that would be all the functions of a living organism, which is, you know, a whole lot of physiology And, Ron, as ever Do you really mean every single time And, Ron, I m g A mere ten years ago this would have been my Book of the Year But I m a different reader now Not necessarily a better or smarter reader, just different So I pause when I read a sentence like As ever, his whole physiology sprang into action. Where is the editor to ask Ron, do you really mean his whole physiology Because that would be all the functions of a living organism, which is, you know, a whole lot of physiology And, Ron, as ever Do you really mean every single time And, Ron, I m going to have to wrestle you to the ground if you insist on saying sprang into action I pause too when I read Painfully aware of his mistakes as president, Grant fantasized about reentering the White House to correct those errors and redeem his reputation. Sorry, but there is not a single shred of evidence in this book or elsewhere that Grant believed he had made mistakes or that he wished to correct them On the contrary, if he got a chance to do it again, I suspect he would still try to annex Santo Domingo, still send Sheridan out to trample the rights of Native Americans fairly won through treaties, still appoint incompetents to Cabinet level positions, and still demand the resignations of actual qualified appointees who disagreed with him And, Ron, fantasized Four years ago, Frank P Varney published General Grant and the Rewriting of History which forever changed the way I read History He took the conventional wisdom of historians that General William S Rosecrans was weak, vain and irresolute and lacking Grant s superlative drive and focus, and then he backtracked through each volume to find the basis of why that was said to be so Invariably, the footnote trail led to Grant s Memoirs Varney went beyond that single source and looked at military orders, dispatches, and correspondence, and I think convincingly showed that the consensus verdict on Rosecrans was flawed He showed too, to my satisfaction, that Grant s literary assault on Rosecrans was spiteful, vindictive and self serving So, I waited for Chernow to get to the battle of Chattanooga And he wrote Rosecrans was weak, vain, and irresolute, lacking Grant s superlative drive and focus. You know, the party line A different reader now, I looked for Chernow s authority for such a claim There s none except, what should have been a caution, a citation to Grant s wife s Memoirs, recounting Grant smiling when he got Rosecrans transfer paper.See, there s enough in Chernow s own book to demand skepticism of Grant, without even going to groundbreaking historical research Grant lauded Rosecrans one of the ablest purest of men, both in motive and action until he didn t The same with Grant on Winfield Scott Hancock, who Grant praised until he suspected Hancock of political aspirations in competition with his own, and then was deemed a coward No single person didto advance Grant s career than Elihu Washburne Yet, the moment Grant suspected Washburne of having presidential ambitions, Grant ended his relationship with him Confronted with irrefutable evidence of fraud, Grant could turn a blind eye if it helped family or friends, even directing his attorney general not to make deals which could lead to convictions And then there are the many omissions and equivocations in the Memoirs that Chernow points out But if you have your mind made up, as Chernow seems to have done, then you can insist that Grant was scrupulously honest and a stickler for the truth This then becomes an ipse dixit, so Grant wins every dispute.You can still like Grant, as I do, and yet admit the flaws Some other random thoughts about the book In Hamilton, Chernow seemed to dwell, almost creepily, on Hamilton s sexuality Here, Chernow seems preoccupied with Grant s drinking Not that Grant s alcoholism wasn t important It was But, here, every meal seems to need a report whether Grant inverted his wine glass And, and, Chernow ends the book with that issue, as if that was Grant s greatest challenge.If a biographer s sources are mostly other previous biographies McFeely, Foote, McPherson, Catton one wonders why the need for this new book It may be that an author has achieved certain purchase that his view, his take on things becomes the reason And Chernow has certainly won all the awards and now, thanks to Broadway, has earned star status Chernow s judgment is that Grant was smarter than you d think, unquestionably honest, but hopelessly na ve with business associates Nothing new there What Chernow highlights though is Grant s efforts in support of new rights for African Americans I fear I ve criticized this writing to the point where it seems I hated the book I didn t On the contrary, I fairly gobbled it up I just found some things jarring Grant is still a great story, with lessons for today And this book challenged me a good thing , just perhaps in unintended ways.Can t wait for the musical


  2. Trish Trish says:

    This book requires a serious time commitment Grant lived 132 years ago, not so long in the course of things Much had been written about him at the time, and much after He himself wrote memoirs that are highly regarded and that showed his intelligence and shrewdness His mother in law Dent, Julia s mother, noticed that although he had failings alcohol and could sometimes get off track career wise an inability to make money as an independent entrepreneur , he had a fine political mind That This book requires a serious time commitment Grant lived 132 years ago, not so long in the course of things Much had been written about him at the time, and much after He himself wrote memoirs that are highly regarded and that showed his intelligence and shrewdness His mother in law Dent, Julia s mother, noticed that although he had failings alcohol and could sometimes get off track career wise an inability to make money as an independent entrepreneur , he had a fine political mind That his mother in law, a supporter of southern slave holdings, had such good things to say about his instincts is impressive in itself The cover copy says Grant was unappreciated for much of his career This should give succor to individuals who struggle through various jobs, unable to find something in which they can excel Grant went to West Point almost by accident, disliking the jobs assigned him by his father, a tanner He apparently hated the smell of the tannery and warm blood, and found himself unable to eat meat unless it was charred beyond recognition His horsemanship was legendary, even from a young age, and the skill served him well throughout his military career That career stalled after a stint in the Mexican War, and revived during the Civil War when he could showcase his particular skills in strategy and logistics.The book cannot adequately be recapitulated in short form, so I resort to impressions hammered home by Chernow in a thousand examples that Grant decided to trust certain people whether they were knaves or not He tended to hold onto his initial impressions even when he had reason to abandon support for individuals who d done him wrong It strikes me that this failing of his, a failing of accuracy in judgment, could be a reason he as so well liked as a leader He was loyal, generous, kind, and willing to forgive as well as extraordinarily skilled himself in being able to read a battlefield, the condition of his men, and the heart of the opposition Grant was not as skilled at the diplomacy he would later be asked to perform in his role as president, though he gavepositions to people of color than any previous government, and he was instrumental in reforming the civil service I would like to readabout a diplomat that Chernow seems to praise above all others, Hamilton Fish, Secretary of State for the entire of Grant s presidency More than anything, Chernow makes clear that Grant s life, despite the lofty heights of public regard during certain periods, was a real struggle all the way through Never has a presidency seemed like such a bum job after having fought a terrible, bloody war on one s own soil for so many years, Grant had to face the unrepentant vanquished again as leader of a divided nation The racism and bitterness we see and hear now is a mere echo of what was going on during Reconstruction, when every attempt to raise the quality of life of black people was fought every step of the way Makes one want to force those who refuse to accept their defeat to their knees now notalk, noaccommodation I wish it were as simple as bringing out the big guns the law and ending this But we see now how deep the sense of entitlement still is.Any portion of this book is worthwhile to read even if you can t get to the whole thing It s so important to recall the details of the Civil War and its aftermath now, in this time of division in our own country If I had my druthers, this book would be shorter My brain s ROM has been gummed up with this work for months now and it nearly crashed my hard drive I feel I am cheating in some way by not being able to expressmoments of revelation, but there were so many I m sure there is something to be said for putting in every detail of a man and his country, and perhaps it is reasonable to repeat oneself occasionally Readers may select portions, or spread out the reading over a long period However, it is difficult to digest a book of this size.I listened to the audio of this book and looked over the hard copy The audio was very well read by veteran actor Mark Bramhall, and it was produced by Penguin Audio


  3. Michael Finocchiaro Michael Finocchiaro says:

    Ron Chernow s epic Grant is a masterful piece of scholarship which succeeds in bringing this much maligned and misunderstood President into focus and making him indomitable on the battlefield , incorruptible with respect to rights for African Americans , and na vely gullible Ulysses S Grant is truly a rags to riches story oraccurately rags to potential to rags to riches to rags to equilibrium to death which covers his childhood and first bankruptcy, his generalship during the Civil Wa Ron Chernow s epic Grant is a masterful piece of scholarship which succeeds in bringing this much maligned and misunderstood President into focus and making him indomitable on the battlefield , incorruptible with respect to rights for African Americans , and na vely gullible Ulysses S Grant is truly a rags to riches story oraccurately rags to potential to rags to riches to rags to equilibrium to death which covers his childhood and first bankruptcy, his generalship during the Civil War, his two terms as President, and finally, as his extraordinary world tour and the writing of his memoirs edited by Mark Twain and written as he was dying of cancer The scope is breathtaking and the heft is arm crushing 958 pages of tight, unforgettable prose Grant is revealed to be a person of little emotional expression and yet deep, sincere feelings of injustice He fought tooth and nail for the liberation of black slaves, for their integration into the Union army, and for the protection of their rights during Reconstruction It was work that was not without missteps along the way, but given the prevailing racism both north and south of the fracture between the Rebels and the Union, it is remarkable The descriptions of battle are extraordinary giving us the sense of Grant s strategy, his absolute imperturbability under fore, and his horror of bloodshed His predecessor, Andrew Johnson, bears many comparisons in his lack of character and his overt racism to another recently impeached president Against this background, it is remarkable that Grant kept the faith and continued to the very end to fight against racism and slavery Grant s greatest adversary was probably not Lee, but his own alcoholism He struggled with this, with some failures and successes, all his life It is another tribute to his strength that this crippling addiction was held at bay over four decades during which he was a primary actor in the American drama in the late 19c Grant has suffered from a double standard in the eyes of historians When Lincoln employed patronage for political ends, which he did extensively, they have praised him as a master politician when Grant catered to the same spoilsmen, they have denigrated him as a corrupt opportunist p 733 Chernow tries to show Grant in arealistic light struggling with alcoholism, fighting corruption and still being duped time and time again because of his idealism, perceived by history through a double standard and he succeeds marvelously On many issues Grant was way ahead of his time he sponsored legislation which was an early form of the Civil Rights legislation of 1965, he saw Florida becoming a great resort for invalids and people wishing to avoid the rigors of a Northern Winter p 893 , he saw the US expand West leveraging European capital to eclipse Europe in military power and eventually in economic power as well He was truly a remarkable man, as Frederick Douglass intoned In him the Negro found a protector, the Indian a friend, a vanquished foe a brother, an imperiled nation a savior p 957 Maybe Douglass exaggerated a bit on the Indian piece because that was one of Grant s moral blindspots he na vely believed that Indians could peacefully accept a complete change in their lifestyle which led to massacres and eventually genocide under successive administrations.Besides the dramatic finish writing the last line in his Memoirs just as he passes away from virulent throat cancer and his struggle with alcoholism, I found his relationship with Lincoln touching and moving They made quite the unlikely and yet visionary team One does wonder whether the extreme violence of the post War South would have been avoided if Booth s bullet had not cut Honest Abe s life short in 1865.This biography is an absolute masterpiece and deserves your attention and merits your time Those who ignore errors in history are doomed to repeat them There is much to learn from Grant and much to both emulate and avoid Definitely also read the masterful Team of Rivals The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln to get an even deeper perspective on Lincoln and the Civil War and insight into the Virginia campaigns before Grant was given control of the Union armies


  4. Diane S ☔ Diane S ☔ says:

    I ve finished admidst an outpouring of tears If only we could have cloned this man.At 1074 pages this is one of the longest audio books, or for that matter a physical book that I finished Plus, I could have continued reading , so I think that is quite a testimony I m not going to attempt to explain this book or this man, one needs to experience that for themselves So I ll just say that in my junior year of Highschool history class I learned little and what I remember is that he drank alo I ve finished admidst an outpouring of tears If only we could have cloned this man.At 1074 pages this is one of the longest audio books, or for that matter a physical book that I finished Plus, I could have continued reading , so I think that is quite a testimony I m not going to attempt to explain this book or this man, one needs to experience that for themselves So I ll just say that in my junior year of Highschool history class I learned little and what I remember is that he drank alot This book not only how unfair it is to judge someone on just one thing, but that there isto someone than short excerpts taught in class.The author does a wonderful job, showing Grants strength and his weaknesses His naivete where friends where concerned and his genuine honesty with himself and others I finished liking this man as a General, as a President and as a father and husband He had integrity, courage and was harder on himself than on others We could use men like him now, men with the courage to do what they think is right regardless of the consequences If you are at all interested in the Civil War or Grant himself, this is the book to read.I loved the narrators voice too, Mark Bramhall, so fives all the way around


  5. Lori Lori says:

    By the end of Grant s second term, white Democrats, through the redeemer movement, had reclaimed control of every southern state, winning in peacetime much of the power lost combat They promulgated a view of the Civil War as a righteous cause that had nothing to do with slavery but only states rights to which an incredulous James Longstreet once replied, I never heard of any other cause of the quarrel than slavery No myth making here, just beautifully researched history There s no wa By the end of Grant s second term, white Democrats, through the redeemer movement, had reclaimed control of every southern state, winning in peacetime much of the power lost combat They promulgated a view of the Civil War as a righteous cause that had nothing to do with slavery but only states rights to which an incredulous James Longstreet once replied, I never heard of any other cause of the quarrel than slavery No myth making here, just beautifully researched history There s no way it s perfect I don t think that s possible Ulys, as friends and family called him, as an officer, as President, and as a failed businessman Like every other addict, resisting his addiction or failing to resist is always part of the story Fortunately, for him, he had his wife, Julia, and some trusted friends to help


  6. Darwin8u Darwin8u says:

    When did Grant ever turn back He was not that sort he could noturn back than timeWalt Whitman, quoted in Ron Chernow, Grant Ron Chernow delights in writing about complicated American Icons and money men It might seem odd that Chernow would chose Grant after writing about Washinton, Hamilton, John D Rockefeller, the Morgans and the Warburgs, but Chernow also loves rehabilitative writing Just look at what his biography of Hamilton did helped out mightily by Lin Manuel MirandaWhen did Grant ever turn back He was not that sort he could noturn back than timeWalt Whitman, quoted in Ron Chernow, Grant Ron Chernow delights in writing about complicated American Icons and money men It might seem odd that Chernow would chose Grant after writing about Washinton, Hamilton, John D Rockefeller, the Morgans and the Warburgs, but Chernow also loves rehabilitative writing Just look at what his biography of Hamilton did helped out mightily by Lin Manuel Miranda Grant is a great subject to write about He is a complicated man, with an interesting story, surrounded by a slew of fascinating characters Chernow is also one of my favorite US biographers He isn t quite as high up the biographer Olympus as Caro who is really , but is consistently better IMHO than McCullough, Meacham, and Ellis among the Costco selling blockbuster biographers Perhaps, the proper place for Chernow is next to Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Herbert Donald, and Edmund Morris This year has seen two massive Grant biographies I m planning on reading Ronald C White s 864 page biography sometime in the last 1 3 of 2018 This summer, I will also attempt to read Grant s own Memoirs this summer So, I might have to come back and revise my review after reading White and Grant For now, let me just say that Grant should probably be viewed as a great American top 10 , and mediocre president 25 30 It is, however, difficult to imagine any president emerging out of the post Civil War Reconstruction Johnson years with any huge levels of success The hostilities of the South to Reconstruction, and black engagement in the economic and political spheres practically divided the nation again, post Civil War Northern Republicans also seemed exhauted by the horrors of Reconstruction, and largely abandoned blacks But Grant, despite his failings in many spheres, bravely fought for the legal and voting rights of the newly freed slaves longer than almost any of his peers during that time would have But Grant was complicated His blind trust and reliance on old friends, and lack of experience in politics and business, bit him hard and lead to several large scandals during both terms and after his presidency Chernow avoids turning this book into a hagiography, but only just Clearly Chernow thinks Grant s reputation gets hammered too hard for his scandals and drinking and not enough time is spent on his successes foreign policy, fighting the KKK, etc My other mild criticism of Chernow, besides a clear resurrectionist bent, is skimming quickly over the financial and economic implications related to the gold standard debate see Mehrsa Bahadaran s review and subsequent Long Depression of 1873 79 I find it fascinating that a writer Chernow with a background in heavy in financial writing and thinking he was once the director of financial policy studies with the Twentieth Century Fund , tends to bore easily with the major financial issues of Grant s tenure.But overall, I loved the book I loved the sections on Reconstruction and was surprised to learn details about Longstreet, Lee, and Sherman that I didn t know before I was happy to devote a week to reading it Finally, Chernow writes primarily about banking families and American biographies Chernow s Banking Dynasties 1 Titan The Life of John D Rockefeller, Sr 2 The House of Morgan An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance 3 The Warburgs The Twentieth Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family Chernow s American Political Biographies 1 Alexander Hamilton 2 Washington A Life 3 Grant Upon reviewing my reviews, I m convinced Chernow does slightly better at writing histories of individuals rather than families politics rather than finance However, I should note, I ve enjoyed ALL of his books and he s a master at his craft


  7. Perry Perry says:

    he was nothing heroic.and yet the greatest heroWalt Whitman of Ulysses S GrantA blue ribbon historical biography by Ron Chernow, who is one of the only historical biographers in recent years to gain some public notoriety, from his Alexander Hamilton serving as the basis and inspiration for the still SRO Hamilton on Broadway.We read biographies, it seems to me, to remind us that the individual can matter and to learn what came to make the individuals who have mattered most On both phe was nothing heroic.and yet the greatest heroWalt Whitman of Ulysses S GrantA blue ribbon historical biography by Ron Chernow, who is one of the only historical biographers in recent years to gain some public notoriety, from his Alexander Hamilton serving as the basis and inspiration for the still SRO Hamilton on Broadway.We read biographies, it seems to me, to remind us that the individual can matter and to learn what came to make the individuals who have mattered most On both points, Chernow s Grant is a grand slam.The book most significantly accomplishes two goals One, it provides clarity, context and perspective on Grant s faults, and why he s gotten a bum rap in history classes over the past century after being one of the three most favorably viewed presidents at the end of the 19th century Second, it shows his huge accomplishments during his two terms serving as United States president Chernow holds Grant accountable for his faults, but demonstrates that they have been greatly exaggerated or overblown as the result of the Southerners resentment and in service to their Lost Cause myth that the Civil War was fought over states rights and not over slavery As Chernow thoroughly examines and concludes Grant was an alcoholic, but a situational one rather than habitual drinker and the evidence indicates he never drank during a major military campaign he was not a butcher on the battlefield, but beat the Southerners with smarts as well as numbers and even his mistakes the carnage at Cold Harbor and bloody Shiloh had in mind winning the war sooner than later and thus saving lives by its end he was not incompetent, but rather gullible, naive and too trusting of those upon whom he relied and hired in his administration, as well as at fault for hiring too many old friends and family and, while his administration was stained as corrupt, he never benefited a dime, and again was burned and his reputation tarnished by those he negligently trusted Theimportant point of this bio is that the faults have unfairly obscured his successes in office Grant fulfilled what he considered his mission as president preserving the Union and safeguarding the freed slaves He crushed the first incarnation of the KKK who had killed thousands of former slaves and their supporters And, he ensured the passage of the civil rights amendments to the U.S Constitution, the 13th outlawing slavery, the 14th applying the Bill of Rights including every citizen s right to equal protection to the states, and the 15th granting black men the right to vote As Frederick Douglass declared, Lincoln made the negroa freeman and General Ulysses S Grant made him a citizen, in placing Grant alongside Lincoln as the man who had done the most for the nation s 4 million former slaves.Chernow also splendidly covers his younger years and what made him so great as the commanding general of the Union Army Chernow concludes that Grant is worthy of being labeled the Civil Rights president After reading this rather hefty bio, I agree


  8. Chrissie Chrissie says:

    This is an exceptionally good book It is well researched It is comprehensive and thorough It is so comprehensive and so thorough that one needs to take a break from it now and then What this means perhaps, in reality though, is that the author should have in some parts lightened the tone, related a humorous incident or switched to a less ponderous topic, a topic easier to absorb, just for a while, to give the reader a bit of a break Reading this book is a commitment and it is best to know t This is an exceptionally good book It is well researched It is comprehensive and thorough It is so comprehensive and so thorough that one needs to take a break from it now and then What this means perhaps, in reality though, is that the author should have in some parts lightened the tone, related a humorous incident or switched to a less ponderous topic, a topic easier to absorb, just for a while, to give the reader a bit of a break Reading this book is a commitment and it is best to know this when you start The book covers just about everything that is known about Grant 1822 1885 His youth is covered rather briefly Readers learn of his participation in the Mexican American War 1846 1848 The Civil War, Reconstruction and Grant s two terms in office as President are detailed in full Soldiers, both Union and Confederate, fellow Republicans, friends and foes, those he worked with and appointed to top governmental positions are all meticulously documented Every person and topic touched upon is covered in full The book is not merely about Grant but just as much about the era he lived in and all those he rubbed shoulders with during his life His two year four month journey around the world, including the places he saw and the dignitaries he met, as well as his travels and talks given while visiting most of the states in the union before a possible third term election, that by the way fizzled at the Republican convention, are recounted too The corruption and frauds that plagued Grant s presidencies, his lack of business acumen, his gullibility, his naive trust in the goodness of man, as well as his alcohol addiction are all here.At book s end one feels one has a full understanding of Grant, not just what he did but also who he was and what made him tick His relationships with members of his family and with those he had contact with are fully explored When John Aaron Rawlins, Grant s longtime staff advisor, confidant, friend and defender dies, I felt I personally had lost a friend All is recounted in a relatively balanced manner At the same time, it is made quite clear that Chernow likes the man he is writing about Chernow admires Grant He seems willing to forgive mistakes made and to proffer possible explanations for Grant s weaknesses, follies and errors The author s sympathetic view of Grant ispronounced in the beginning of the book Chernow s view becomesbalanced by the book s end The only real criticism I have is that bits of information are repeated several times It feels like the author seems to have forgotten that we had already been told this or that One might ask for better editing The book ends well, so well that I was tempted to give it five stars It closes with Grant s writing of his own memoir It was Mark Twain who wanted Grant to write his memoir and it was Twain s publishing company that brought it into print And then Grant dies He dies of mouth cancer and his death is one of excruciating pain and suffering At this point, you are suffering with him The process of writing his memoir is what had kept Grant alive Twain states that he regrets he had not spoken with Grant about his alcohol addiction He points out that which is missing from Grant s own memoir These topics are covered here in Chernow s book, and you realize how very good the book you have just completed has been One must admit this is a clever move by Chernow Grant s excruciating death first weakens the reader and then we are pushed to feel how very lucky we are to have access to such a comprehensive tome I am nevertheless sticking with my four star rating I like the book a lot and this is exactly what four stars is supposed to mean I personally am not an expert on the Civil War or American presidents and for me a few less details would have made the book easier to get through The book is excellent, but my rating expresses my reaction to it The audiobook is narrated by Mark Bramhall His performance is impeccable He uses different intonations for different speakers, but he never exaggerates He does this with true finesse The tempo is perfect You hear every word The narration is definitely worth five stars Titan The Life of John D Rockefeller, Sr 5 stars Alexander Hamilton 4 stars Washington A Life 4 stars Grant 4 stars The House of Morgan An American Banking Dynasty and the Rise of Modern Finance TBR The Warburgs The Twentieth Century Odyssey of a Remarkable Jewish Family TBR


  9. Sue Sue says:

    This is an excellent biography which I recommend to those who enjoy that genre or history in general or American history specifically While focused on Grant as it should be, this book also provides needed background on the state of the United States when Grant was a child and as he grew, as these changes in turn affected Grant s life and decisions.Truly an excellent biography, covering childhood through to burial, Grant s struggles to find a place in the world before the coming of the Civil War This is an excellent biography which I recommend to those who enjoy that genre or history in general or American history specifically While focused on Grant as it should be, this book also provides needed background on the state of the United States when Grant was a child and as he grew, as these changes in turn affected Grant s life and decisions.Truly an excellent biography, covering childhood through to burial, Grant s struggles to find a place in the world before the coming of the Civil War which led to his and others discovery of his military talents I learned so much history of that era as well as of Grant s life To all intents and purposes, Grant was foundering in both military and civilian life prior to the beginning of the Civil War It was only as he rose up through the ranks of officers and assumed battleground responsibilities, developing his own strategies, during the Western campaign of that war that his star began to rise and his skills and strengths were recognized He too began to recognize that he had found a place he could succeed Ultimately he found the major sponsor he would need and want, the President, Abraham Lincoln, for whom Grant provided much needed victories at a time of Northern despair.After the war, the road seemed to lead only to the White House There, some personality and work military habits that had developed over time did not serve him well Over time, they led to some long held negative views of his presidency It is interesting that some of the personality traits that served Grant so well during wartime proved problematic when he was president One of these involved his problem solving and decision making skills He was used to acting quickly, independently, almost instinctively As President, he often did not consult with his cabinet, Congress, etc., did not consider public reactions when making decisions This often led to conflict with Congress, members of Congress and backlash from the public Also, because of an essential naivete about people, Grant would become enmeshed in schemes begun by various businessmen who sought to benefit from his position, his name, his past This problem existed before the war, continued while he was in the White House and lasted for the rest of his life He tended to admire the powerful and rich of his time and was slow to read them as individuals He accepted them at their word and lost money and reputation at their hands Chernow also deals with the often told tales of Grant s problems with alcohol in a way that feels very convincing to me.Chernow s biography is excellent, painstaking in its detail from childhood to burial, outlining Grant s foibles and strengths, what he added to the institution of the presidency and what left with him Grant lived during a hugely important time in American history when the nation was moving from an agrarian to an industrial society when the issue of secession was fought and decided to the degree it would be when the continent was about to be crossed by the railroad and the many tribes of Indians were being forced off the lands they had roamed for so many generations Grant participated in all of these as a private individual, a soldier or a President.I highly recommend this book A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review


  10. Mackey Mackey says:

    I was born and raised in the southern part of the United States The name U.S Grant was spoken with disdain, whether it was in a familial conversation, at a historical site, or in a history class in high school or at university Two Northern Generals, Grant and Sherman, have been firmly engrained in the minds of young southern minds as the worst two people who ever walked on American soil You can imagine how excited I was, then, to receive this book Grant to read for review Whatdid I was born and raised in the southern part of the United States The name U.S Grant was spoken with disdain, whether it was in a familial conversation, at a historical site, or in a history class in high school or at university Two Northern Generals, Grant and Sherman, have been firmly engrained in the minds of young southern minds as the worst two people who ever walked on American soil You can imagine how excited I was, then, to receive this book Grant to read for review Whatdid I possibly need to know about this terrible man Well, as it turns out, I had a LOT to learn The first thing that one needs to know, Ulysses S Grant is not his real name It was a mistake made when he entered the military academy As with the remainder of the book, this was the first of many historical facts, that Chernow sets out to correct From his childhood until his death, I doubt there ever has been a man in American history who has been painted so erroneously Perhaps it was due to the aftermath of the Civil War, perhaps in part because of the war itself, however, every single thing that I ever had been taught about President Grant was, in fact, wrong and not only wrong, but an outright lie created to destroy the man s reputation And we just think this type of thing is a product of the 21st century.Chernow is an artful storyteller and the book readslike historical fiction than a non fiction account of Grant s life I found myself onthan one occasion cross checking his statements because they did, in fact, seem too outlandish to be true His research and his facts are, indeed, well grounded My only, very slight, complaint is that Chernow obviously came to admire Grant a great deal It s difficult not to do so That does show through in some of his writing, especially toward the end He appears to lose a little of the objectivity needed to write a non fiction account However, as I stated, it does not affect the facts of the book in any way If you like history or even historical fiction then I highly recommend this book to you If you are a southerner, I think it is a must read in order to correct the misconceptions of a lifetime of ill learning


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Grant [PDF / Epub] ☀ Grant By Ron Chernow – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Ulysses S Grant s life has typically been misunderstood All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and inept businessman, fond of drinking to excess or as the triumphant but brutal Union gener Ulysses S Grant s life has typically been misunderstood All too often he is caricatured as a chronic loser and inept businessman, fond of drinking to excess or as the triumphant but brutal Union general of the Civil War or as a credulous and hapless president whose tenure came to symbolize the worst excesses of the Gilded Age These stereotypes don t come close to capturing adequately his spirit and the sheer magnitude of his monumental accomplishments A biographer at the height of his powers, Chernow has produced a portrait of Grant that is a masterpiece, the first to provide a complete understanding of the general and president whose fortunes rose and fell with dizzying speed and frequency Before the Civil War, Grant was flailing His business ventures had been dismal, and despite distinguished service in the Mexican War, he ended up resigning from the army in disgrace amid recurring accusations of drunkenness But in the Civil War, Grant began to realize his remarkable potential, soaring through the ranks of the Union army, prevailing at the Battle of Shiloh and in the Vicksburg campaign and ultimately defeating the legendary Confederate general Robert E Lee after a series of unbelievably bloody battles in Virginia Along the way Grant endeared himself to President Lincoln and became his most trusted general and the strategic genius of the war effort His military fame translated into a two term presidency, but one plagued by corruption scandals involving his closest staff All the while Grant himself remained or less above reproach But, importantly, he never failed to seek freedom and justice for black Americans, working to crush the Ku Klux Klan and earning the admiration of Frederick Douglass, who called him the vigilant, firm, impartial, and wise protector of my race After his presidency, he was again brought low by a trusted colleague, this time a dashing young swindler on Wall Street, but he resuscitated his image by working with Mark Twain to publish his memoirs, which are recognized as a masterpiece of the genre With his famous lucidity, breadth, and meticulousness, Chernow finds the threads that bind these disparate stories together, shedding new light on the man whom Walt Whitman described as nothing heroic and yet the greatest hero His probing portrait of Grant s lifelong struggle with alcoholism transforms our understanding of the man at the deepest level This is America s greatest biographer, bringing movingly to life one of America s finest but most underappreciated presidents The definitive biography, Grant is a grand synthesis of painstaking research and literary brilliance that makes sense of all sides of Grant s life, explaining how this simple Midwesterner could at once be so ordinary and so extraordinary.