Il sole dei morenti PDF/EPUB Ã Il sole PDF/EPUB or

Il sole dei morenti PDF/EPUB Ã Il sole PDF/EPUB or


    Kindle Welcome to the Kindle ereader store seguendo percorsi di vita diversi e che reagiscono diversamente, chi con solidariet chi con cattiveria In fondo al viaggio c Marsiglia e la speranza di rivedere L a, il grande a della sua giovent."/>
  • Paperback
  • 236 pages
  • Il sole dei morenti
  • Jean-Claude Izzo
  • Italian
  • 15 January 2019
  • 8876416102

10 thoughts on “Il sole dei morenti

  1. Josh Josh says:

    Izzo s A Sun for the Dying is about fractured and painful memories and the loss and search for love, many times over The author writes about a subject that many of us cannot relate to The main character, Rico, is the down and out homeless guy that does what he can to survive, but also has pride enough not to break his own rulesuntil there s no other way to live.Memories are what Rico has his body lives in the present while his mind lives in the past Dreams are shattered Coughing, hurti Izzo s A Sun for the Dying is about fractured and painful memories and the loss and search for love, many times over The author writes about a subject that many of us cannot relate to The main character, Rico, is the down and out homeless guy that does what he can to survive, but also has pride enough not to break his own rulesuntil there s no other way to live.Memories are what Rico has his body lives in the present while his mind lives in the past Dreams are shattered Coughing, hurting, he withers away.As we lose the people we love, something else dies inside of us, we die, yet we still move on


  2. Zuberino Zuberino says:

    By sheer coincidence, right after I started this book, I chanced upon Rust and Bone, the latest film by French auteur director Jacques Audiard Ostensibly a hard bitten romance set in Antibes just up the road from Cannes, the film is also a paean to the French working class A lucky find, because it gave me another window on to contemporary France while reading J C Izzo, although in truth the world that Izzo describes in A Sun for the Dying is several hellish circles lower than the level inhabit By sheer coincidence, right after I started this book, I chanced upon Rust and Bone, the latest film by French auteur director Jacques Audiard Ostensibly a hard bitten romance set in Antibes just up the road from Cannes, the film is also a paean to the French working class A lucky find, because it gave me another window on to contemporary France while reading J C Izzo, although in truth the world that Izzo describes in A Sun for the Dying is several hellish circles lower than the level inhabited by the principals in Rust and Bone Izzo deals in human extremes One freezing winter s evening in Paris, a homeless man curls up on a train platform, out of sight behind some seats By the next day, Titi is dead from exposure His friend Rico, himself homeless for several years, is badly shaken by this event, and sees in Titi s death a foretelling of his own future He resolves right then to go south, to sunny Marseilles on the shores of the Mediterranean If his fate is written, if die he must, then Rico decides that it will be in the sun, in the golden Marseilles of his past Jean Claude Izzo was an exceptional writer, and his premature death at the age of 55 must have been a heavy blow not just to French literature but also to the wider literature of Europe He tells Rico s story with great skill and deftness a harmless man a middle class salesman, no less for whom bad luck and personal failings combine with such terrifying ferocity that his family, his career, his entire world disappear around him as if swept away by a tsunami His fall from the bourgeois suburbs to the harsh streets is complete within a matter of months Episodes of Rico s past life are told in flashback a youthful affair with the long lost Lea, never forgotten the doomed marriage to the cold and cruel Sophie Izzo always exercises tight control over the story telling, maintaining momentum and tension as Rico drifts in and out of his alcohol soaked haze, from the present to the past and back to the present again Moreover, Izzo is strong on the day to day details of the homeless life the physical routines, the mental processes, the endless chain of hardships, big and small, constant and without relief But most important by far is the moral force of Izzo s writing His anger at the indifference and unfairness of the world shines through in every page like a bright white light Who was the last European writer who wrote of the underclass, the dregs and dropouts of society, with so much rage and empathy My mind goes back to Orwell in Down and Out, but even Orwell to my memory never scaled these heights in his book The extent to which Izzo has entered the mind of Rico, has become Rico is possible only through total annihilation of the authorial ego, an alchemy of empathy and imagination Two characters stand out on Rico s journey south the scumbag Dede and the wise child Felix, sporting lizard tattoos and always carrying a football, utterly lost within himself Reaching Avignon, Rico finds Mirjana, a Bosnian refugee turned prostitute with a passion for the poetry of Saint John Perse Her entire family slaughtered in the civil war, Mirjana has come to the west thanks to the tender mercies of people smugglers and pimps who are modern Europe s version of slave traders Somehow this bitter kindred soul represents Rico s final chance to slow down his slide into oblivion, to reverse his fate When their bond is violently broken, Rico s fate is effectively sealed These pages, the sequence with Mirjana, are among the most moving and most powerful that I have ever read I, for one, am not able to look at London s homeless hordes with the same eyes after reading this book The last 50 pages, set in Marseilles, are narrated by an Algerian teenager called Abdou Another refugee from another civil war that chewed up lives and spat out human husks in the 1990s He is Rico s last friend, a surrogate son, and he will bear witness to Rico s death By the end, Rico s meaningless life, his pointless death have gained a tragic grandeur in Izzo s hands That Jean Claude Izzo is no longer around to shake us up with his moral vision is a howling loss for all of modern literature Two special shoutouts to Europa Editions, this is their second successive book that I ve read, and to the translator Howard Curtis who has done a sterling job with this book Keep up the good work


  3. robin friedman robin friedman says:

    Down And Out In Paris And MarseillesJean Claude Izzo 1945 2000 was born in Marseilles to immigrant parents, giving him the life of an outsider In the 1990 s Izzo wrote a series of noir novels, known as the Marseilles Trilogy, which made him famous His final book, A Sun for the Dying tells the story of a homeless, down and out man in his 40s, Rico For three years, Rico has lived on the streets of Paris When his only friend, a homeless man named Titi, freezes to death at a metro stop, Rico Down And Out In Paris And MarseillesJean Claude Izzo 1945 2000 was born in Marseilles to immigrant parents, giving him the life of an outsider In the 1990 s Izzo wrote a series of noir novels, known as the Marseilles Trilogy, which made him famous His final book, A Sun for the Dying tells the story of a homeless, down and out man in his 40s, Rico For three years, Rico has lived on the streets of Paris When his only friend, a homeless man named Titi, freezes to death at a metro stop, Rico leaves Paris and journeys to Marseilles in the south of France The story is harsh, violent, graphic and moving as it speaks of love, loneliness, and loss.The book is divided into two parts The first part of the book takes the reader from Rico s life on the streets of Paris through a brutal beating he suffers from two pimps in Avignon This part is narrated in the third person with an occasional reference to an I who comments on some aspect of the story he recounts The second part of the book begins about a year after the first part Rico has survived his beating and found his way to Marseilles This portion of the story is told in the first person by the same narrator who speaks in part 1 an adolescent boy named Abdou, 13 15 years of age, who has smuggled himself into Marseilles from Algiers Rico befriends Abdou Part 1 tells what Abdou has understood from Rico about Rico s life Part 2 is Rico s life in Marseilles as Abdou sees it.Throughout the book, scenes from Rico s life on the streets are interspersed with flashbacks of his past life The flashbacks center on Rico s search for love and his relationships with women Rico wants to return, homeless and broken in heart, to Marseilles because as a young 20 year old fresh from military service he had fallen in love with Lea He never forgot the beauties of their affair on the shore of Marseilles Rico broke off with Lea and married a woman, Sophie, and the couple had a boy, Julien Rico was modestly successful as a travelling salesman When Sophie leaves Rico for another man, Rico is crushed He begins drinking heavily, loses his job, has affairs with two women, Julie and Malika, before landing inexorably on the street homeless and alone In Avignon, during the journey to Marseilles, Rico has his last live relationship with a woman, a young prostitute from Bosnia named Mirjana The relationship is intense on both sides and ends with Rico s beating from the pimps.With its violent and lurid character, the book is cast in the form of a spiritual journey as well as a quest by Rico for the memories of his lost loves melded together in Lea, Sophie and Mirjana There are three authors, Kerouac, Saint John Perse, and Homer, whose works help frame the journey.The most important influence on the book is Kerouac After Rico s friend Titi dies early in the story, Rico remembers how Titi compared their journey in life to those of the beats that Jack Kerouac described in On the Road and The Dharma Bums Kerouac s spiritual quest pervades Rico s own sad journey Rico travels with the flamboyant and criminal Dede, possibly a reminder of Dean Moriarty, Sal Paradise s travelling companion in On the Road As for the second author, Mirjana, the prostitute with whom Rico has a relationship, carries among her few possessions a book of poems by the French poet Saint John Perse Little known to Americans, Perse was a diplomat as well as a poet who was forced to flee Vichy France during the 1940 s Perse won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1960 His evocative, difficult poems of the hope of a better life for people inspire Rico briefly and give Mirjana the strength to live.The third important author on the journey is Homer Near the end of the book, when Rico befriends Abdou, the pair briefly discuss Homer s Odyessy with its parallels to their own wandering lives and searches for love These books and many of the French song lyrics that appear in the novel do a great deal to set the books themes of searching, love, loss, and memory.The novel is harsh and raw, reminding me in places of Charles Bukowski The book spoke to me of the universal character of suffering and of the common elements of the human condition For all the desperation of Rico s life, a small sense of hope comes through based upon the power of love Rico s final understanding of his life and his search may not be the same as the adolescent narrator s understanding This, Izzo s final book, is absorbing, disturbing, beautifully written and bittersweet.Robin Friedman


  4. Lukasz Pruski Lukasz Pruski says:

    That night, Rico decided to leave Paris If he was going to die, he might as well die in the sun. I did not have an easy time reading Jean Claude Izzo s A Sun for the Dying 1999 More than a half of the novel is written in an annoyingly didactic style, with the tone alternating between preachy and slightly patronizing At the end of each short chapter I was almost expecting to see questions for book club readers about what the author wanted to convey in the chapter Fortunately, I persist That night, Rico decided to leave Paris If he was going to die, he might as well die in the sun. I did not have an easy time reading Jean Claude Izzo s A Sun for the Dying 1999 More than a half of the novel is written in an annoyingly didactic style, with the tone alternating between preachy and slightly patronizing At the end of each short chapter I was almost expecting to see questions for book club readers about what the author wanted to convey in the chapter Fortunately, I persisted in reading on and the last third of the novel unexpectedly hit me with real literary artistry memorable scenes, touching themes, and some beautiful prose And while excessive sentimentality and mushiness dominate the ending of the book, at least the author seems to be treating the reader as a grown up.Rico in the past a successful salesman, a member of financially secure middle class, owner of an expensive home, happy husband of a beautiful woman and a proud father has gradually lost everything he had and loved Whatever calamity was possible to happen did happen to him yes, partly because of wrong choices he made, but mainly because of adversity of fortune and he found himself at the very bottom of society He is now homeless in Paris, lives on the street, begs for money, suffers from a serious lung disease and is an alcoholic When his best friend freezes to death sleeping in the metro station, Rico decides to move to Marseilles, the city of eternal sun, the city where he really loved for the first time and where he spent some of the best days of his life with the beautiful and loving L a.Rico reminisces about the life he once had and the women he once loved His travel south is a quest to recapture the lost past, the past full of happiness and promise He makes new friends on the road, and even meets a woman who becomes totally unexpectedly maybe the truest love of his life By the way, the tender love scene devoid of any sexual overtones, is to me the best passage in the novel The author turns out quite skillful in manipulating the reader s emotions because even this reviewer, a disillusioned and diehard cynic, had tears in his eyes.Two and three quarter stars


  5. Gina Rheault Gina Rheault says:

    If you remember Ratso Rizzo from the movie Midnight Cowboy , sick and cold in wintry New York, heading south to the warmth of Florida, dying on a Greyhound Bus before he makes it, you will think he has been reincarnated into 1990 s France Rico used to have a job, a house, a wife and a son, but now he drinks too much, sleeps where he can, views his wife and son in the distance as they go about their lives He has begged, he has just seen his best friend die alone of the cold in a Paris subway s If you remember Ratso Rizzo from the movie Midnight Cowboy , sick and cold in wintry New York, heading south to the warmth of Florida, dying on a Greyhound Bus before he makes it, you will think he has been reincarnated into 1990 s France Rico used to have a job, a house, a wife and a son, but now he drinks too much, sleeps where he can, views his wife and son in the distance as they go about their lives He has begged, he has just seen his best friend die alone of the cold in a Paris subway station, and sees himself as next in line So, he heads south to Marseilles where at the very least, if he is going to die, he can be warm This is a remarkable book that lets you into the skin of a person you may have seen in your own town but are afraid to talk to because he is dirty, drunk, and smells bad It lets you see someone who was someone once upon a time, and for whom the world has shrunk down to today, this hovel, this meal The narrator of Rico s story reveals his identity very late in the book and it is unexpected This book in all its sadness, is worth a re read to understand how it feels from under the blue tarp of the chronically homeless who live in shanties under bridges, who beg at stoplights with cardboard signs as Phil Ochs sang it Show me an alley, show me a trainShow me a hobo who sleeps out in the rainAnd I ll show you a young man with many reasons whyThere but for fortune, go you or IEnglish edition A Sun For the Dying Italian edition ILSole Dei Morenti


  6. David David says:

    Paris is freezing, and when his friend Titi dies curled up in the subway, Rico decides to head for Marseilles, drawn by the sun and sea, and by memories of his youthful love, L a, back when he was still alive So begins the graceful slow motion ballet of Rico s journey to the coast, and back through his life, a descent into hell amidst the echo of closing doors the loss of wife and son, of sobriety, of career, of parents, of love, of self respect, until at last he is transformed into a social a Paris is freezing, and when his friend Titi dies curled up in the subway, Rico decides to head for Marseilles, drawn by the sun and sea, and by memories of his youthful love, L a, back when he was still alive So begins the graceful slow motion ballet of Rico s journey to the coast, and back through his life, a descent into hell amidst the echo of closing doors the loss of wife and son, of sobriety, of career, of parents, of love, of self respect, until at last he is transformed into a social and psychological ghost, haunting the streets and haunted by the past Other down and outs share his road the predatory D d , the reserved F lix, and the Bosnian prostitute Mirjana, who is held together against the harsh mistral of Avignon by a hollow hatred of the man who killed her family, and who, like Rico, has forgotten how to cry with happiness There are surprises waiting in Marseilles, for the reader, if not for Rico Like a chanson by Jacques Brel or Charles Aznavour, Izzo s harsh, honed prose so perfectly embodies that Gallic genius for balancing bleak unsentimentality with intense, frank emotion, making this a likely hit not just with fans of noir including Izzo s own Marseilles trilogy , but devotees of Charles Bukowski, Hubert Selby Jr., and other great modern tragedians, readers whose deepest sadness will be that Izzo s own premature death has left little else to translate


  7. Donald Donald says:

    Homelessness, friendship, death, sex, violence, Marseilles Let me drown, forever, amen.


  8. Peter Weissman Peter Weissman says:

    Could be the saddest book I ever read And one of the best.


  9. Jim Jim says:

    When I think about tramps, especially French tramps, I think about Beckett The names D d and Rico even sound like Didi and Gogo and when I hit the following passage What are we doing here, D d Can you tell me that We re waiting, dammit I already told you well, the deal was sealed But of course they re not Didi and Gogo Beckett s tramps were ideals D d and Rico live in the real world Some things they wait for come the mobile soup kitchen, death others forgiveness, re When I think about tramps, especially French tramps, I think about Beckett The names D d and Rico even sound like Didi and Gogo and when I hit the following passage What are we doing here, D d Can you tell me that We re waiting, dammit I already told you well, the deal was sealed But of course they re not Didi and Gogo Beckett s tramps were ideals D d and Rico live in the real world Some things they wait for come the mobile soup kitchen, death others forgiveness, redemption only in dreams Unlike Orwell s Down and Out in Paris and London, published in 1933, or Tony Wilkinson s Down and Out from the eighties this is a work of fiction but despite that it underlines a problem which has never gone away and, since the Syrian refugee crisis, is only going to get worse The book s narrated by Abdou, an Algerian living in Marseilles, who tells people he s thirteen but he might be as old as fifteen he has no papers to indicate otherwise The story he relates is not his but in telling it we do learn a few things about him, how his parents were executed in front of him and how he escaped on a freighter by hiding in the machine room where he d ended up being burned badly second degree burns on his face and body and had to spend a whole month in hospital on reaching port After two months in France he runs across a bum standing in front of a billboard on which there s a poster for a brand of women s underwear called Aubade He tells the boy the model s his wife, Sophie It s not but the two bond and begin hanging out together In doing so the bum, Rico, tells Abdou his story and Abdou tells us For the longest time we don t actually know who s doing the talking but once we do I found myself a little disappointed because the level of insight suggests an omniscient narrator I honestly can t imagine the Rico the boy encounters in Marseilles, after several years living rough and drinking heavily, would share or be able to share as much detail as Abdou s account contains and most readers won t think twice about it but I would ve preferred if his retelling included gaps and conjecture.Why do people become bums The noble vagabond, the free spirited rambler as presented to us by the likes of Robert Louis Stevenson or the romanticised hobos of the American Great Depression are a far cry from the likes of D d , Rico and Titi, Rico s best friend who dies in the metro in the opening chapter of the book but is brought to life again and again as Rico tells Abdou about him Rico we learn once had a decent job and a family but all it took was a few things to go wrong for him and his life as he knew it suddenly become untenable and crumbles about him Had he not met and teamed up with Titi things might ve gotten a lot worse a lot quicker but together they provide each with a reason to keep going D d doesn t fill the gap and Rico decides to leave Paris and head to Marseilles Marseilles In Rico s restless, painful sleep, images of Marseilles had resurfaced Slowly at first Then in waves Streets, squares, bars The sea, the beaches, the white rockThese memories were like picture postcards sent him by the past As if the past had finally found his address, and was forwarding mail that hadn t been distributed for fifteen years Greetings from Marseilles Best wishes from Marseilles Nostalgia drives him Before marrying Sophie he d had a relationship with a woman called L a One day she sent him a postcard from Marseilles saying, Come, and he had Was this where his life went wrong Should he have stayed with L a and not married Sophie He s not exactly going looking for L a but once he arrives he ends up seeing here time and time again But it s L a as she used to be At one point he tells Abdou about glimpsing her on a bus I m going to that bus stop tomorrow, and I m going to wait for her He put his arm around my shoulders and hugged me There were tears in his eyes I m going to surprise her I let him talk I knew that by the next morning he d have forgotten Not about L a, but about Bus No 83 and the stop by the harbour It would only take a few beers, or a bottle of cheap wine, and a night s sleep, and everything would melt away in his head This is why I think Abdou s account is too detailed Rico s clearly on his last legs The death of Titi has been one loss too many He never says in so many words that he s going home to die not even sure if Marseilles counts as home but it s there in the subtext Titi went back to M nilmontant to die, Rico had continued That station was his last home The place where he met his friendsI m getting out of Paris, D d Hell, man, where are you going South Marseilles Rico had seen the surprise in D d s eyes You have something lined up down there NoJust a few good memoriesBut I can t stick around here any, it s too painfulHomelessness A Silent Killer , a paper produced in 2011, reported that homeless people in the UK who suffer the stresses and strains of alcoholism and substance abuse live only a little longer than those in the poorest countries, with the average age of death at 47 for men and 43 for women I can t imagine the figures for France being much different We never learn exactly how old Rico is but if, as Abdou suggests, L a would now be woman of forty it stands to reason Rico wouldn t be much older.Izzo tells his story dispassionately This is how the world is He doesn t paint Rico as a victim or a villain If he has a fault it s that he s a weak man Well, I m not exactly a tower of strength and I wouldn t like to imagine how long I d survive if I lost all my home comforts There but for the grace of God, as the devout say Not sure what excuse non believers have.On the whole a good book There s a lot it doesn t do Izzo has no answers but what it does is remind us that very little divides the haves from the have nots We shouldn t be too quick to judge


  10. Darius Ostrowski Darius Ostrowski says:

    Mr Izzo has written a wonderful, hard book to read, due to the subject matter His main character is Rico, a homeless man whose friend Titi dies in a Paris winter, who decides to head back to the last time he was truly happy, to Marseilles, to die in the sun.His journey is one that passes through distant memories, declining health, acts of kindness, acts of cruelty, friends and enemies, cold indifference, petty functionaries with a modicum of power, other lost souls each with their own paths to Mr Izzo has written a wonderful, hard book to read, due to the subject matter His main character is Rico, a homeless man whose friend Titi dies in a Paris winter, who decides to head back to the last time he was truly happy, to Marseilles, to die in the sun.His journey is one that passes through distant memories, declining health, acts of kindness, acts of cruelty, friends and enemies, cold indifference, petty functionaries with a modicum of power, other lost souls each with their own paths to how life beat them down It s very easy to see how a few twists of fate or poor decisions could happen to any of us, those barely living on the edge of our society, and tip us into the life of a Rico.Mr Izzo takes us through the day to day struggles, the long hours, the need to forget that the homeless face Something that we all should be aware of and thankful that fate hasn t chosen to turn on us


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Il sole dei morenti➹ [Download] ➵ Il sole dei morenti By Jean-Claude Izzo ➼ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Il sole dei nti l ultimo romanzo scritto da Jean Claude Izzo prima della sua prematura scomparsa il suo capolavoro una struggente esplorazione del potere distruttivo dell a, la storia di un uomo che c Il sole dei nti l ultimo romanzo scritto da Jean Claude Izzo prima della sua prematura scomparsa il suo capolavoro una struggente esplorazione del potere distruttivo dell a, la storia di un uomo che cerca l a e non lo trova, e per questo viene relegato ai margini della societ Il merito di Il sole PDF/EPUB or Izzo di di riuscire a farci identificare con un destino apparentemente estremo, quello di un essere umano che ha perso tutto Quando i pompieri portano via il corpo di Tit , l unico amico rimastogli, morto di freddo in una stazione del metr parigino, Rico decide che ora di andarsene, lasciare Parigi per il sud Se deve morire, tanto vale morire al sole Nel suo viaggio incontra altri disperati come lui, persone finite sulla strada seguendo percorsi di vita diversi e che reagiscono diversamente, chi con solidariet chi con cattiveria In fondo al viaggio c Marsiglia e la speranza di rivedere L a, il grande a della sua giovent.


About the Author: Jean-Claude Izzo

Jean Claude Izzo was a French poet, playwright, screenwriter, and novelist who achieved sudden fame in the mid s with the publication of his three noir novels, Total Chaos Total Kh ops , Chourmo, and Solea widely known as the Marseilles Trilogy They feature, as protagonist, ex cop Fabio Montale, and are set Il sole PDF/EPUB or in the author s native city of Marseille All have been translated into English by Howard CurtisJean Claude Izzo s father was an Italian immigrant and his maternal grandfather was a Spanish immigrant He excelled in school and spent much of his time at his desk writing stories and poems But because of his immigrant status, he was forced into a technical school where he was taught how to operate a latheIn , he began work in a bookstore He also actively campaigned on behalf of Pax Christi, a Catholic peace movement Then, in , he was called up for military duty in Toulon and Djibouti He then worked for the military newspaper as a photograph and journalist.