Fly Away Peter ePUB ´ Fly Away ePUB Ò

Fly Away Peter ePUB ´ Fly Away ePUB Ò


    Kindle Welcome to the Kindle ereader store acknowledge for all three of them that the past cannot be held."/>
  • Paperback
  • 134 pages
  • Fly Away Peter
  • David Malouf
  • English
  • 03 July 2018
  • 0099273829

10 thoughts on “Fly Away Peter

  1. Roger Brunyate Roger Brunyate says:

    Bird s Eye ViewThis is an exquisite little novella that begins in beauty on the coast of Queensland and ends almost in the mud of Flanders on the other side of the world Birds, of course, make similar migrations this is one of the things that fascinates 20 year old Jim Saddler as he studies birds with borrowed binoculars, noting their species, their habits, their comings and goings He strikes up a friendship with Ashley Crowther, the young owner of this stretch of Australian farmland, and a Bird s Eye ViewThis is an exquisite little novella that begins in beauty on the coast of Queensland and ends almost in the mud of Flanders on the other side of the world Birds, of course, make similar migrations this is one of the things that fascinates 20 year old Jim Saddler as he studies birds with borrowed binoculars, noting their species, their habits, their comings and goings He strikes up a friendship with Ashley Crowther, the young owner of this stretch of Australian farmland, and also with Imogen Harcourt, a middle aged photographer with a similar passion But then the 1914 War breaks out, and Jim and Ashley sign up, in different regiments and at different ranks.There are many books about the Western Front The ingredients are all much the same boredom, companionship, carnage What makes one stand out from another is the quality of the writing, the particular point of view, and whatever aspects of normal life the author chooses to set against the obscenity of war The last book I read about Flanders, for example, Sebastian Barry s A Long, Long Way, was written with a rich Irish poetry, kept its point of view very much at ground level, and set the War against the very different Irish fight for independence back home Malouf s writing is also poetic, but simpler, and he excels particularly at describing the surroundings of the war, as in the following Often, as Jim later discovered, you entered the war through an ordinary looking gap in a hedge One minute you were in a ploughed field, with snowy troughs between ridges that marked old furrows and peasants off at the edge of it digging turnips or winter greens, and the next you were through the hedge and on duckboards, and although you could look back and still see the farmers at work, or sullenly watching as the soldiers passed over their land and went slowly below ground, there was all the difference in the world between your state and theirs They were in a field and very nearly at home You were in the trench system that led to the war. But it is Malouf s juxtaposition of the battlefield to the Australian nature reserve that is so daring For there is no possibility of a literal resolution that connects them Indeed, Malouf seems to avoid following narrative links Ashley and Jim barely meet again, and the biplane so prominently featured on the cover ultimately serves only to offer Jim a metaphor for his own bird s eye view on life Yet it is an important metaphor The two halves of the book portray beauty and destruction with memorable power But the coherence of the novel as a whole depends upon the final chapter, which returns to Imogen Harcourt watching the birds among the sand dunes I had to sleep on this and re read it for it to fully work, but now I see the beauty in her simple understanding of the life that connects both birds and man


  2. Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly Joselito Honestly and Brilliantly says:

    This follows the same formula as his Remembering Babylon First, the story Here, a simple country lad who s into bird watching David Malouf throws in a possible love interest, most likely pretty, who does photography Also a rich, young man who becomes his friend Both guys goes to war World War 1 The contrast, from the peaceful idyll of their natural world in Australia to the numbing horrors of trench warfare From colorful birds to rotting corpses Some characters die, untimely, needles This follows the same formula as his Remembering Babylon First, the story Here, a simple country lad who s into bird watching David Malouf throws in a possible love interest, most likely pretty, who does photography Also a rich, young man who becomes his friend Both guys goes to war World War 1 The contrast, from the peaceful idyll of their natural world in Australia to the numbing horrors of trench warfare From colorful birds to rotting corpses Some characters die, untimely, needlessly Finally, towards the end, a couple of paragraphs where the point of everything that has happened is distilled, becomes crystal clear, powerfully written like you d want to copy or memorize them Like this one, where the girl photographer, remembering Jim Saddler the bird watcher in that certain pose of his when he was closely examining a picture of a bird she showed him the first time they met It was that intense focus of his being, it s ME, Jim Saddler, that struck her with grief, but was also the thing and not simply as an image either that endured That in itself Not as she might have preserved it in a shot she had never in fact taken, nor even as she had held it, for so long, as an untaken image in her head, but in itself, as it for its moment was That is what life meant, a unique presence, and it was essential in every creature To set anything above it, birth, position, talent even, was to deny to all but a few among the infinite millions what was also, in the end, most moving A life wasn t FOR anything It simply was The meaning of life in a short, bittersweet paragraph This is what makes literature great With a captive, addicted, gullible readers it can solve life s great mysteries by lying beautifully


  3. Sarah Sarah says:

    20 09 Had to read this for year 12 English and I didn t really understand it and therefore didn t enjoy it I find both situations strange as I am usually drawn to Australian war stories, fiction and non fiction Maybe it deserves a re read with my older,mature brainone day.14 4 16 New Review due to Reread20 4 I think this might be the least enjoyable war story I ve read It took till page 80 of 138 before we got to anything interesting, before that it was all about Jim and his 20 09 Had to read this for year 12 English and I didn t really understand it and therefore didn t enjoy it I find both situations strange as I am usually drawn to Australian war stories, fiction and non fiction Maybe it deserves a re read with my older,mature brainone day.14 4 16 New Review due to Reread20 4 I think this might be the least enjoyable war story I ve read It took till page 80 of 138 before we got to anything interesting, before that it was all about Jim and his fascination with the birds Malouf is reasonably well known for his poetry and all that work writing poetry was evident in this novel Large chunks of this book were page long run on sentences that seemed to go on forever and he s never met a comma he didn t want to use to death I can see why I didn t understand or like this 14 years ago and I can also see why my English teacher was doing cartwheels at the chance to get us to analyse this pile of existentialist she described it thus waffle isn t it an English teacher s job to get us to love reading by forcing us to read books assured to make us hate it , fortunately I was able to become attached to books before English teachers came into my life I won t be reading anyof Malouf s work and this book is getting donated to a hopefullyappreciative home.2016 POPSUGAR Reading Challenge Category A Book Set in Your Home State Queensland


  4. Bec Bec says:

    Fly Away Peter is the story of Jim Saddler, an avid birdwatcher living in Queensland in the early 1900s When the war arrives in 1914, he enlists, and, travelling to France, becomes a bitter soldier fighting a losing war, while musing on the meaning of life And that s about all that happens The first time I read this book, I didn t like it very much I thought it was boring, slow paced, with too many descriptions of birds and a rather tame description of the battlefield But then we had to ana Fly Away Peter is the story of Jim Saddler, an avid birdwatcher living in Queensland in the early 1900s When the war arrives in 1914, he enlists, and, travelling to France, becomes a bitter soldier fighting a losing war, while musing on the meaning of life And that s about all that happens The first time I read this book, I didn t like it very much I thought it was boring, slow paced, with too many descriptions of birds and a rather tame description of the battlefield But then we had to analyse this book for my english class this year, and I can now say with total honesty, that I still do not like it very much But I can respect it now, and definitely respect Malouf as a writer The whole of Fly Away Peter is crafted to perfection not a single sentence goes by without subtle foreshadowing or a clever metaphor The overarching theme of this novel is Jim s journey from innocence to darkness, and Malouf uses every opportunity to insert a metaphor, a simile, or a piece of symbolism that only becomes apparent on a second reading For those reasons, I have to say that I did not enjoy Fly Away Peter as I would usually enjoy a novel, but I can certainly admire it for its fine craftsmanship, its attention to detail, and for the fantastic, subtle way in which Malouf chronicles one man s descent from innocence into darkness


  5. Ainsley Ainsley says:

    David Malouf is one of Australia s most talented authors, renowned for his sensual, descripive style Unfortunately for him and me , I happen to loathe this style of communication I admire people who can maintain a sense of interest and wonder as Mr Malouf spends two or three pages describing how the character felt when walking up a hill This book deals, at least partially, with war and communicates the confusion of a soldier in battle reasonably well However, that s all it does You are lef David Malouf is one of Australia s most talented authors, renowned for his sensual, descripive style Unfortunately for him and me , I happen to loathe this style of communication I admire people who can maintain a sense of interest and wonder as Mr Malouf spends two or three pages describing how the character felt when walking up a hill This book deals, at least partially, with war and communicates the confusion of a soldier in battle reasonably well However, that s all it does You are left wondering exactly what happened, aware that if you pore through the script that you might find out, but too bored to try


  6. Elizabeth Elizabeth says:

    I love David Malouf s writing I picked up this old 1982 novel at a used book store and didn t think it would be as good as hisrecent stuff Now I remember why I love his style his writing is very poetic he is a poet and descriptive He s one of those writers who capture the geography of the land as well as the mind of the narrator He s received many awards, but I believe if he were British rather than Australian, he would have gotten a lotThis novel of WWI Australia and Europ I love David Malouf s writing I picked up this old 1982 novel at a used book store and didn t think it would be as good as hisrecent stuff Now I remember why I love his style his writing is very poetic he is a poet and descriptive He s one of those writers who capture the geography of the land as well as the mind of the narrator He s received many awards, but I believe if he were British rather than Australian, he would have gotten a lotThis novel of WWI Australia and Europe describes the world of Edwardian Australia is that a term All the young men are so eager to fight in Europe really for a world that is not theirs in a battle that makes little sense


  7. David Sarkies David Sarkies says:

    A rant about literature21 July 2012 To be honest with you I thought this novel was littlethan a load of existentialist rubbish I have only read two of Malouf s novels, this one and the one about Ovid being exiled to the edge of the Roman Empire It seems as if there is something in common with these two novels Ovid is exiled from the centre to the fringe while here, in this novel, the main characters go from the fringe being Queensland in Australia to the centre being the trenches in A rant about literature21 July 2012 To be honest with you I thought this novel was littlethan a load of existentialist rubbish I have only read two of Malouf s novels, this one and the one about Ovid being exiled to the edge of the Roman Empire It seems as if there is something in common with these two novels Ovid is exiled from the centre to the fringe while here, in this novel, the main characters go from the fringe being Queensland in Australia to the centre being the trenches in France during World War I However I have no real intention of making any big deals about that because I really do not want to make a big deal about this book Maybe it had something to do with my English teacher praising this novel as one of the greatest pieces of Australian literature ever written, and me just thinking that his tastes and my tastes differed so sharply that when he would begin praising a novel, I would begin hating it Look, I might be being a bit too harsh on Malouf, but after having to sit through A Street Car Named Desire, A Glass Menagerie, and Henrik Ibsen in year 12 English I had come to a point that I would pretty much hate anything that my English teacher loved, and this book was one of them as was Gallipoli, which he was using as a contrast to this book since both of them involve the main characters getting slaughtered in the trenches of World War One I do remember making a comment about how at the end of the book the main character, after being blown apart I think and going into a afterlife where he is forever digging into the ground in an attempt to return to Australia, was in hell, my teacher objected and asked how is he in hell What did he do wrong Well, if forever digging in the ground attempting to get to a place you will never reach is not hell, then what is Seriously dude, there is a Greek myth in which some guy is forever pushing a boulder up a hill only to have it roll back down again before it reached the top That guy I can t remember his name off hand was in hell, and if he was in hell, so is Malouf s main character, even if Malouf never intended it to be that way I think the problem with modern literature is that people either write books purely for entertainment, or they write it in a vain attempt to win some wonderful prize of have Oprah recommend the book on her show ala Deep End of the Ocean and become some wonderful literary author that everybody wants to imitate Sorry to burst your bubble, but so are all the other million of wanna be authors out there I think Jim Butcher had it right when he said that writing was bloody hard work and if you want to succeed then you have to be bloody persistent You either write because you love to write as I do or you go and do something real with your life Seriously, writing is like acting, millions think that it is an easy way to make heaps of money but guess what, it isn t Hey, at least writing gives youtransferable skills than acting or playing football As for writing literature, you don t set out to do it, it just happens I doubt Fyodor Dostoyevsky or Anton Chekhov, or even Shakespeare, ever set out to write a classic No, they wrote because they either loved writing or had something that they wanted to say, and it just happened that history judged their works to be worthy of being called a classic As far as I am concerned, your book or story is not a classic unless it survives a hundred years, and is still imprint, or, even better, manages to survive a dark age such as The Odyssey I once read about a writer who had finished writing a book and screamed out that he had just written a work of literature, and proceeded to throw it into the fire writers can be a very strange lot, especially the good ones Emily Dickinson locked herself in her room and had no contact whatsoever with the outside world As for writing a book with meaning, look, either say it as Dostoyevsky did or don t don t try to cloud it with imagery when it is not necessary to do so Don t get me wrong, I love allegory, but the reason that Jonathon Swift wrote in allegory was because if he didn t he was likely to be dragged out of his house by British soldiers, tied to a stake, and executed for sedition okay, I am probably going overboard a bit, but you can probably understand what I am getting at George Orwell wrote allegory, and his allegory worked really well, namely because it would have multiple layers of meaning Animal Farm for instance appears to be about Soviet Russia when in reality it could really be about dear old England similar in that 1984 could actually be about what it was like in 1948, the year the novel was publish As for C.S Lewis, he wanted to portray the Christian message to an audience children who probably could not grasp what is essentially an adult concept not that children do not understand Bible stories, but I remember as a kid in Sunday School that I never understood the nature of Christ s sacrificial death Finally I want to mention Tolkien He wrote a fantasy novel, and a pretty damn good one as well However, when people started carrying on about how it is an analogy of how industrialisation is destroying the world his response was what I hate allegory Lord of the Rings is not allegory, it is a fantasy novel


  8. Tundra Tundra says:

    Just like the dunlin, a European water bird, that Jim has spotted as a solitary refugee in his beloved marshland in Queensland, Jim finds himself in the trenches of France far from home and alone This is a beautiful novella that zooms in and out to glimpse the minute and the vastness of these two places which contrast greatly but are connected by earth and sea and the birds that navigate between them.I picked this book up at a Lifeline bookfair and it s been sitting on my shelf for some time I Just like the dunlin, a European water bird, that Jim has spotted as a solitary refugee in his beloved marshland in Queensland, Jim finds himself in the trenches of France far from home and alone This is a beautiful novella that zooms in and out to glimpse the minute and the vastness of these two places which contrast greatly but are connected by earth and sea and the birds that navigate between them.I picked this book up at a Lifeline bookfair and it s been sitting on my shelf for some time I m glad I finally got around to reading another Malouf book I read Harland s Half Acre a number of years ago while driving across Australia and it s still stuck with me as I m sure this will too


  9. Lesley Moseley Lesley Moseley says:

    Read years ago, and have never forgotten the ending


  10. Clari Clari says:

    really educating.


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Fly Away Peter[Reading] ➻ Fly Away Peter Author David Malouf – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk For three very different people brought together by their love for birds, life on the Queensland coast in is the timeless and idyllic world of sandpipers, ibises and kingfishers In another hemisphere For three very different people brought together by their love for birds, life on the Queensland coast inis the timeless and idyllic world of sandpipers, ibises and kingfishers In another hemisphere Fly Away ePUB Ò civilization rushes headlong into a brutal conflict Life there is lived from moment to momentInevitably, the two young men sanctuary owner and employee are drawn to the war, and into the mud and horror of the trenches of Armentieres Alone on the beach, their friend Imogen, the middle aged wildlife photographer, must acknowledge for all three of them that the past cannot be held.


About the Author: David Malouf

David Malouf is the author of ten novels and six volumes of poetry His novel The Great World was awarded both the prestigious Commonwealth Prize and the Prix Femina Estranger Remembering Fly Away ePUB Ò Babylon was short listed for the Booker Prize He has also received the IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Award He lives in Sydney, Australia.