Telling Lies For Fun And Profit PDF Ô Telling Lies

Telling Lies For Fun And Profit PDF Ô Telling Lies


Telling Lies For Fun And Profit [PDF / Epub] ☃ Telling Lies For Fun And Profit Author Lawrence Block – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Characters refusing to talk Plot plodding along Where do good ideas come from anyway In this wonderfully practical volume, two time Edgar Award winning novelist Lawrence Block takes an inside look at Characters refusing to For Fun PDF É talk Plot plodding along Where do good ideas come from anyway In this wonderfully practical volume, two time Edgar Award winning novelist Telling Lies Kindle - Lawrence Block takes an inside look at writing as a craft and as a careerFrom studying the market, to mastering self discipline and creative procrastination, through Lies For Fun MOBI · coping with rejections, Telling Lies for Fun Profit is an invaluable sourcebook of information It is a must read for anyone serious about writing or understanding how the process works.

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  • Telling Lies For Fun And Profit
  • Lawrence Block
  • 15 July 2018
  • 0877953937

About the Author: Lawrence Block

Lawrence Block has For Fun PDF É been writing crime, mystery, and suspense fiction forthan half a century He has published in excess oh, wretched excess of books, Telling Lies Kindle - and no end of short storiesBorn in Buffalo, NY LB attended Antioch College, but left before completing his studies school authorities advised him that they felt Lies For Fun MOBI · he d be happier elsewhere, and he thought this was remarkably perceptive of themHis earliest work, published pseudonymously in the late s, was mostly in the field of midcentury erotica, an apprenticeship he shared with Donald E Westlake and Robert Silverberg The first time Lawrence Block s name appeared in print was when his short story You Can t Lose was published in the February issue of Manhunt The first book published under his own name was Mona it was reissued several times over the years, once as Sweet Slow Death In it became the first offering from Hard Case Crime, and bore for the first time LB s original title, Grifter s Game is best known for his series characters, including cop turned private investigator Matthew Scudder, gentleman burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr, globe trotting insomniac Evan Tanner, and introspective assassin KellerBecause one name is never enough, LB has also published under pseudonyms including Jill Emerson, John Warren Wells, Lesley Evans, and Anne Campbell Clarke s magazine appearances include American Heritage, Redbook, Playboy, Linn s Stamp News, Cosmopolitan, GQ, and The New York Times His monthly instructional column ran in Writer s Digest for years, and led to a string of books for writers, including the classics Telling Lies for Fun Profit and The Liar s Bible He has also written episodic television Tilt and the Wong Kar wai film, My Blueberry NightsSeveral of LB s books have been filmed The latest, A Walk Among the Tombstones, stars Liam Neeson as Matthew Scudder and is scheduled for release in September, is a Grand Master of Mystery Writers of America, and a past president of MWA and the Private Eye Writers of America He has won the Edgar and Shamus awards four times each, and the Japanese Maltese Falcon award twice, as well as the Nero Wolfe and Philip Marlowe awards, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Private Eye Writers of America, and the Diamond Dagger for Life Achievement from the Crime Writers Association UK He s also been honored with the Gumshoe Lifetime Achievement Award from Mystery Ink magazine and the Edward D Hoch Memorial Golden Derringer for Lifetime Achievement in the short story In France, he has been proclaimed a Grand Maitre du Roman Noir and has twice been awarded the Societe trophy He has been a guest of honor at Bouchercon and at book fairs and mystery festivals in France, Germany, Australia, Italy, New Zealand, Spain and Taiwan As if that were not enough, he was also presented with the key to the city of Muncie, Indiana But as soon as he left, they changed the locks LB and his wife Lynne are enthusiastic New Yorkers and relentless world travelers the two are members of the Travelers Century Club, and have visited around countriesHe is a modest and humble fellow, although you would never guess as much from this biographical note.



10 thoughts on “Telling Lies For Fun And Profit

  1. Jeffrey Keeten Jeffrey Keeten says:

    Let me always remember that I m not in competition with other writers Whether they haveor less success has nothing to do with me They have their stories to write and I have mine They have their way of writing them and I have mine They have their careers and I have mine TheI focus on comparing myself with them, the less energy I am able to concentrate on making the best of myself and my own work I wind up despairing of my ability and bitter about its fruits, and all I manage to Let me always remember that I m not in competition with other writers Whether they haveor less success has nothing to do with me They have their stories to write and I have mine They have their way of writing them and I have mine They have their careers and I have mine TheI focus on comparing myself with them, the less energy I am able to concentrate on making the best of myself and my own work I wind up despairing of my ability and bitter about its fruits, and all I manage to do is sabotage myself As I was going back through my notes to write this review, the quote above really jumped out at me because I devoted a certain amount of my weekend reading an international bestseller I was looking for a bit of insight from a first novel by a writer that had created so much buzz that there was a bidding war for the rights It won numerous prizes, too many to list I started reading it, hoping some of the magic would reveal itself to me I was, needless to say, underwhelmed on practically every point that a novel is judged by More importantly I was left questioning what was important to me about my own writing To me, this book was nothingthan a good airplane spinner rack book that would divert me while on a long flight Nothing wrong with that, but for the book to be lauded asthan that was frankly alarming Thank goodness Lawrence Block was here to help me recenter myself I still was thinking to myself, if readers were all aglow about this type of book, was there really a place in the market for the type of novel that I would write Of course, it was almost as if Block was reading my mindPlease, don t ever allow me to hold my audience in contempt Sometimes I find this a temptation, because by diminishing the reader I am less intimidated by the task of trying to engage his interest and hold his attention But in the long run I cannot be disrespectful of my reader without my work s suffering for it Okay, so I need Larry on speed dial, but fortunately for him, if I keep this book near to hand, I won t be driving him insane, railing about my own inadequacies or the inadequacies of readers or the fickleness of publishers What is really remarkable about this book is how Block squeezes the bitterness out of every aspect of writing and continually focuses the task of writing back towellwriting These are a series of articles that Block wrote for Writer s Digest, and even though this book was compiled in 1981, the advice and observations are as relevant for a writer today as they were for a struggling writer in the mid 1980s Yes, you will be reading about him pounding away at a typewriter instead of soft tapping on a computer keypad, but writing is still writing Good storytelling has not evolved that much past the days of the dinosaurs when early homo sapien was drawing stick figures on a cave wall to tell the story of a successful hunt I read pieces of this book each morning before sitting down at my desk to write He is so optimistic and wise that my confidence was soaring at a high level by the time I started tickling the keys When I say I plan to keep it near to hand, I m not joking It is going to reside on my desk, and whenever I get blue or doubtful, I will open it to a random page and start readingIt s only a book, I ve told myself time and time again Sometimes it feels like the most important thing in your life, and it seems to be what you do to justify your own existence, but don t take it so seriously It s just words on paper, it s just a pack of lies Listen, it s only a bookWhen I decided to sit down and start writing a novel, I tied myself up in knots to the point that I had difficulty beginning Everything I wrote, I loathed It was only after I decided that I didn t have to write The Great Gatsby after all, it has already been written that I finally unwound my tangled limbs and began to write what I wanted to write More importantly, I started writing what I wanted to read Block reassured me that trying to write a book that I think publishers or readers will like is a pure formula for writing something that I, the writer, will end up despising And what is the point of that.Block also relentlessly hounds me to submit and submit and submit again until some poor bastard buys something I have written I ve been piling up stories and novels like a squirrel hoarding nuts, but I have only dipped my toe in the water a few times with submissions and received the typical slammed door rejection Fitzgerald papered his walls with rejection slips, but it didn t seem to deter him from continuing to write, and thank goodness he proved resilient Even after Block became a well respected writer, he was still getting rejected Rejection is just part of the game Even John Douglas, who wrote Mindhunter, talks about how difficult, even today, it is for him to get a book deal That sort of puts everything in proper perspective Rejection is never fun, no matter how calloused you may become, but it must be kept in proper perspective as well Block discusses the proper use of dialogue and how important good dialogue is for a story He talks about not beginning a story at the beginning He explains what a lead looks like He talks about minimizing self abuse not masturbation butlike flagellation He explains character building He assures us that creative procrastination is not always a bad thing and is sometimes necessary Should you write in first person or third Seriously, in this relatively short book he manages to answer about any questions you might have as a writer I love this quote from Martin Cruz SmithLawrence Block is a writer s best friend He is wise, he is funny, and, to tell the truth, he is damn helpful When best friends and mothers fail, read this bookI was frequently snorting or chuckling or even laughing out loud at many of Block s humorous assertions He is a master of self deprecating humor There is no doubt that one must have a sense of humor to even consider being a writer Seriously, if you are a frustrated writer and have been considering hanging up your spurs, read this book first It might give your dreams new life Sometimes we try to make writingcomplicated than it is We don t need fancy software programs or even computers I remember Stephen King talking about, in his excellent book On Writing, being stuck in a hotel lobby, waiting to check in, and this idea was just burning him up He finally pulls out a yellow notebook, finds a table with a chair, and sits down to write He couldn t wait to get up to his room and set up his computer He had to write itnow This man has written millions of words, and yet new thoughts and concepts still hound him I find that so inspirational And let me always be grateful that I am a writer, that I am actually doing the only work I ve ever really wanted to do, and that I don t need anyone s permission to do it Just something to write with and something to write on Highly recommended If you wish to seeof my most recent book and movie reviews, visit also have a Facebook blogger page at

  2. Dan Schwent Dan Schwent says:

    Telling Lies for Fun Profit is a collection of some of Lawrence Block s columns from Writer s Digest.Most of the time I see books on writing, they re by people I ve never heard of and I pass them by Stephen King s On Writing has been my favorite book on writing for years but now he has competition.I picked up this book because Lawrence Block has become one of my favorite writers in the past few years and because I felt like I havein common with the esteemed Mr Block than I do Stephe Telling Lies for Fun Profit is a collection of some of Lawrence Block s columns from Writer s Digest.Most of the time I see books on writing, they re by people I ve never heard of and I pass them by Stephen King s On Writing has been my favorite book on writing for years but now he has competition.I picked up this book because Lawrence Block has become one of my favorite writers in the past few years and because I felt like I havein common with the esteemed Mr Block than I do Stephen King and was I ever right Block shares bits of wisdom stemming from his experiences as a writer and entertains as he teaches Block talks about cranking out a soft core porn novel in three days to pay the hospital bills when one of his kids was born, as well as taking forever on other novels Most of the time, I felt like Block was talking directly to me, so much so that this book could have been called Telling Lies for Fun Profit, Dan.Block covers topics as diverse as character names, procrastination, and P.G Wodehouse s skill at turning nouns into verbs, all three being topics near and dear to me So many of the things I experience when I write were addressed in this book So why only four stars The book is pretty outdated I lost count of how many times Block mentioned a typewriter and the idea of using a library for research instead of the internet is almost unfathomable in this day and age But my main gripe was that I wanted it to be four or five times as long Luckily, I already have the next Lawrence Block book in my possession

  3. Jason Koivu Jason Koivu says:

    Crime writer Lawrence Block s book on writing is one of the best I ve ever read By being specific and giving practical advice from long experience, it s muchhelpful than many others Telling Lies for Fun Profit is like a 47 chapter course on how to write like a prowell, hold up It doesn t propose to turn you into the great American writer You won t necessarily become a rich and famous novelist because of this book What I mean is, Block gives you a career s worth of tips on how to h Crime writer Lawrence Block s book on writing is one of the best I ve ever read By being specific and giving practical advice from long experience, it s muchhelpful than many others Telling Lies for Fun Profit is like a 47 chapter course on how to write like a prowell, hold up It doesn t propose to turn you into the great American writer You won t necessarily become a rich and famous novelist because of this book What I mean is, Block gives you a career s worth of tips on how to hone your craft after you ve mastered the basics Quite literally, you must be able to arrange your nouns and verbs in the right order before a book like this will be of any use to you Sound simple enough Well, you d think soHaving read a dozen orhow to write books from established writers, I found that Telling Lies for Fun Profit treads on some familiar territory now and then But even when it did, I still garnered some useful knowledge just from Block s unique take on a subject Even if it wasn t completely unique, it would at least have a fresh angle to its approach One of my favorite parts was when Block admitted that he essentially hates writing Here s the whole excerpt I ll underline the specific part, but as a whole it makessense writing s not much fun.I really wonder why that isIt s been my observation that painters, both professional and amateur, love to paint They get genuine enjoyment out of the physical act of smearing paint on canvas Sometimes they re blocked, sometimes they re frustrated, but when they re painting the very process of creation is a joy to them.Same thing certainly holds true for musicians They only seem to feel alive when they re performing The jazz musicians I ve known spend their afternoons practicing scales and such, work all night performing, then jam for free at an after hours joint until dawn, just for the sheer pleasure of it.In sharp contrast, almost every writer I know will go to great lengths to avoid being in the same room with his typewriter Those of us who are driven to produce great quantities of manuscript don t necessarily get any real pleasure out of the act it s just that we feel worse when we don t write It s not the carrot but the stick that gets most of us moving I don t mean to suggest that there s no positive pleasure connected with writing I enjoy getting ideas, for example both the initial plot germs and the ideas that develop in the course of extended work on a novel And I very much enjoy having written the satisfaction of having completed a taxing piece of work can be monumental.This latter pleasure, come to think of it, is a negative one, isn t it When I m delirious with joy over having finished something, my joy stems in large part from the fact that I do not have to work on it any , that the dratted thing is over and done with So it s nice being about to write, and it s nice to have written But is there no way to enjoy writing while it s going on One thing that impedes enjoyment, I would think, is that writing s hard work Painters and musicians work hard, too, but there s a difference You can t really relax and go with the flow while you re writing at least I can t, and if anyone can show me how, I ll be delighted to learn Writing demands all of my attention and focuses me entirely in the present I can t let my mind wander, and if my mind wanders in spite of itself I find I can t write, and when I want to write and can t write I find myself possessed of murderous rage.When a painting doesn t go well the artist can keep on painting and cover it up When a musician s not at his best, the notes he plays float off on the air and he can forget about them When I m off my form, the garbage I ve written just sits there on the page and thumbs its nose at me And when it gets into print that way, it s there for all the world to see, forever.Painters and musicians would probably quibble over a few points there, but from a writer s perspective, it was nice to hear this sort of stuff from a seasoned professional From the standpoint of a fan of Block s fiction, this was also fun to read, because it was written in the early 80s By then he d published countless books and even completed a series or two At the time though, he was just getting back into the flow of working on his Scudder detective series, the one that most Block fans seem to regard as his best work To hear him talk about it with uncertainty provided a nice, autobiographical insight Highly recommended to writers, as well as to Block s fans

  4. Tracey Tracey says:

    The articles that compose this writing guide are all, happily, nicely written but there s not much new here, I m afraid, and not much applicable to my particular situation Larry Block as he tells the story a couple of times in this collection of essays has basically always written Motivation can be an issue for him, as it is for all writers, but for the most part the driving force that made him apply butt to chair and fingers to keyboard has been that he enjoys eating, and what puts foo The articles that compose this writing guide are all, happily, nicely written but there s not much new here, I m afraid, and not much applicable to my particular situation Larry Block as he tells the story a couple of times in this collection of essays has basically always written Motivation can be an issue for him, as it is for all writers, but for the most part the driving force that made him apply butt to chair and fingers to keyboard has been that he enjoys eating, and what puts food on his table is the money he makes by writing One article which raised my eyebrows a bit was one in which Block talks about how easy it is to excuse oneself from actually applying one s butt to one s chair and writing well, writers are actually working 24 7, every bit of sensory input has the possibility of adding to a scene sometime, there s editing needed, and research, and a good writer reads a great deal etc What it comes down to, for Block, is that yes, he does agree with all of that it s true, after all, even if it is easy to use the list as excuses but what he feels is the real work is actually pushing the current project forward by so many pages He doesn t set times, he says, but instead sets a daily goal that takes as long as it takes His goal is, apparently, five pages a day, and this generally takes about three hours, and then he can feel free to, as he says, go enjoy the day Three hours No wonder so many people want to be writers when they grow up What he doesn t seem to be mentioning here is that it s probably taken him years to reach a level of discipline where he can, as mentioned, apply butt to chair and get to work rather than frittering away time and needing to achieve the correct mindset and such Also, to where he can achieve five pages in three hours with some reliability that s not always a given In my experience sometimes twenty pages will come in that space of time other times, one, and I count myself lucky The reasoning he gives for the five page three hour goal is sound, but the reason my eyebrows went up was that it sounded so very much like something that could be misconstrued Hhe may not at the time of the writing of this book have been making millions, but he d established himself and was making a modest living And the little nugget he neglects here is that the less time you spend writing, the less you will write and the less you write, the less money you can make through your writing I said before that a lot of this misses the mark for me That s because I do not now write and never have written short stories It s not how my mind works Maybe it should be I know in past decades it was almost unthinkable to try to make it with a novel right out of the gate You were supposed to write short stories and submit them and get them rejected and send them out again over and over till someone took them I almost wish I could do that A beaten path is always easier to follow This is the way Jo March did it this is the way E Byrd Starr did it This is the way Lawrence Block did it Me Not so much Short stories are very simply not in my repertoire I don t know if a novel is, either, but that s what s in the works Sort of Due to the nature of the book a collection of articles from whatever magazine this was there is a great deal of repetition Sometimes two essays in a row say essentially the same thing Block says in the introduction that he decided to arrange the book in a sort of chronological by process way, and did very little editing to the essays beyond changing essay to chapter and such As a writer, I m sure this was a tremendous idea As a reader, it wasn t Rather than a book to read straight through, it became a reference book, something to dip into here and there

  5. Eustacia Tan Eustacia Tan says:

    As part of NaNoWriMo preparation and just because I like reading and writing , I decided to read Telling Lies for Fun and Profit by Lawrence Block, nevermind that I ve never even heard of him before And I realised that even if you ve never her of this pulp fiction author, you should definitely read this book if you re interested in writing The book sounded boring at first The first few chapters had stuff like Setting your Sights about how to discover your options as a writer , Studying As part of NaNoWriMo preparation and just because I like reading and writing , I decided to read Telling Lies for Fun and Profit by Lawrence Block, nevermind that I ve never even heard of him before And I realised that even if you ve never her of this pulp fiction author, you should definitely read this book if you re interested in writing The book sounded boring at first The first few chapters had stuff like Setting your Sights about how to discover your options as a writer , Studying the Market the mechanics of market analysis and so on It sounded like a boring book that only had the aim of turning people into publishable writers I m so thankful I skipped the content page and summaries because I might have given up on the book.Because from the first page onwards, the book is engaging and humorous While it isn t one of those follow your heart and everything will be ok , it does have emphasise on writing what you like The difference is that book also insists that you have to know your strengths as a writer and then follow it.In addition, the book also covers things like motivation raising the very valid topic of Sunday Writers as well as nitty gritty details like narrators and plot Each chapter is fairly short but has a lot of content and entertainment value.Speaking of Sunday Writers, the book spends a chapter discussing them You see, in other arts, it s perfectly fine to carry it out as a hobby You can be an ammateur painter, pianist ok, maybe not pianist in Singapore , knitter, etc and not expect to make a living acheive fame But for some reason, if your hobby is writing, you have the urge to make as many people as possible read what you have wrote and ideally, praise it.I suppose that things like NaNoWriMo are there to just make writing fun I was having a conversation with my friends and one of them was complaining about how it s going to be near impossible to reach the 50k word target recommended And in one of my wittier moments, I replied draw deep from the well of bs bullshit.And you know what That s true Writing is fun because you can to write all sorts of things you ll never think of writing otherwise Most of the time, the things we write are boring reports and such I mean, we do tend to stop writing fiction after we leave secondary school So this is when we can indulge our over active imaginations and write whatever we want.That s the fun part, and well, we should be happy that we are writing There s no need to get published an agent.Coming back to the book I m definitely going to be on the lookout forbooks by Lawrence BlockFirst posted at With Love from Japan, Eustacia

  6. Emilie Emilie says:

    I m gonna be honest here I really don t get what all the hype is about with this book It s got some solid advice, all very basic It scratches the surface of a broad range of topics, which is nice, but so shallowly and vaguely at times as to be relatively useless It s also a book from the eighties There might be newer editions out there that are revised and updated, I don t know, but my copy wasn t, and it felt pretty out of touch at times, which I suppose I can t fault an approximately fort I m gonna be honest here I really don t get what all the hype is about with this book It s got some solid advice, all very basic It scratches the surface of a broad range of topics, which is nice, but so shallowly and vaguely at times as to be relatively useless It s also a book from the eighties There might be newer editions out there that are revised and updated, I don t know, but my copy wasn t, and it felt pretty out of touch at times, which I suppose I can t fault an approximately forty year old book for being What I can fault it for is the vague but decidedly uncomfortable sexist and racist undertones that crop up at times In all the numerous examples of fiction referenced, I only noticed one woman writer mentioned, Agatha Christie Similarly, the vast majority of protagonists mentioned in these literary references are men The authour references one of his own books at one point, characterizing it as paraphrasing since I already returned the book to the library a story about a young man trying and failing to get laid It doesn t give me a supreme amount of confidence in his ability to give me solid writing advice, let s just say that.There s also a strong focus on detective crime suspense novels, so the advice is going to beapplicable in that sort of genre and less applicable in other cases There s definitely some good advice in this book as well, but I can t help thinking that there must be better writing advice books written in the past one or two decades out there to read instead, right Maybe even ones not written by an old white guy Maybe ones that don t give me the impression that I never want to actually read one of the authours novels in the slightest Hopefully I can find one of those

  7. Andrew Smith Andrew Smith says:

    I ve long been a fan of Lawrence Block I ve read about 40 of his books and I m still buyingon virtually a daily basis to top up my new Kindle He s a prolific writer and has written well over 100 books I ve long admired the infinite variation in his work and his skill as a wordsmith This aid for those wishing to turn out a tome of their own was written about 30 years ago, way before he wrote much of the material I ve since spent long nights absorbing It s a humorous but hugely informin I ve long been a fan of Lawrence Block I ve read about 40 of his books and I m still buyingon virtually a daily basis to top up my new Kindle He s a prolific writer and has written well over 100 books I ve long admired the infinite variation in his work and his skill as a wordsmith This aid for those wishing to turn out a tome of their own was written about 30 years ago, way before he wrote much of the material I ve since spent long nights absorbing It s a humorous but hugely informing bible on how to write a novel I am totally gobsmacked not a word, I sense, you ll find in one of LB s books at how much there is to know Naively, I thought you just banged away on your laptop until you had sixty thousand words and Bob s your uncle Not a chance But this book tells you all you need to know, even if the amount you need to know is likely to put most people off the idea of writing a novel completely Hugely recommended for those who want to learn how to read a book better as well as those seeking wisdom to enable them to have a go themselves

  8. Tracy Krauss Tracy Krauss says:

    What a gem I literally laughed out loud at some points The author has a very unique, albeit dry sense of humour that makes this book a pleasure to read It s a must for any author successful, aspiring, or otherwise In fact, after reading it through once, I wanted to go back and reread some chapters just for the enjoyment of it Some chapters wereapplicable to my current situation than others, but each one had at least one nugget of wisdom, from very practical writing how to kind of s What a gem I literally laughed out loud at some points The author has a very unique, albeit dry sense of humour that makes this book a pleasure to read It s a must for any author successful, aspiring, or otherwise In fact, after reading it through once, I wanted to go back and reread some chapters just for the enjoyment of it Some chapters wereapplicable to my current situation than others, but each one had at least one nugget of wisdom, from very practical writing how to kind of stuff, tophilosophical questions about writing as a calling versus a job He includes plenty of personal anecdotes that serve to also show readers what not to do I can t believe I haven t come across this book before it s timeless as fresh and relevant now as it was when it was first published despite the changes in the publishing industry All I can really advise is, Read it

  9. Gabriel Gabriel says:

    Plain and simple, one of the best books for fiction writers that I ve read Great for neophytes and veterans Sometimes, it gives you the push you ve been looking for there s a chapter on quite a few different aspects of writing and one of those you probably have a question on.I would have appreciatedexercises in this book especially since it started out in column format, I would have thought there was something that Block could have written at the end that would have been a basic exerci Plain and simple, one of the best books for fiction writers that I ve read Great for neophytes and veterans Sometimes, it gives you the push you ve been looking for there s a chapter on quite a few different aspects of writing and one of those you probably have a question on.I would have appreciatedexercises in this book especially since it started out in column format, I would have thought there was something that Block could have written at the end that would have been a basic exercise in what had just been told Overall, an inspiring read

  10. Steve MC Steve MC says:

    This is one of the best books I ve found on the discipline, craft, and profession of writing I first read it twenty years ago, and just read it again and enjoyed it just as much.Block not only has the experience to write from dozens of novels and plenty of awards but he has that knack for teaching that makes reading this book such a delight He also doesn t hold back on the rough parts of the profession, but tells it to you straight.Each of the chapters were first published in his fiction c This is one of the best books I ve found on the discipline, craft, and profession of writing I first read it twenty years ago, and just read it again and enjoyed it just as much.Block not only has the experience to write from dozens of novels and plenty of awards but he has that knack for teaching that makes reading this book such a delight He also doesn t hold back on the rough parts of the profession, but tells it to you straight.Each of the chapters were first published in his fiction column for Writer s Digest and so they re nice and compact Block also keeps things lively by using unique ways of presenting his material, such as covering the topic of going to college for writing as a letter to his niece, and another as a back and forth lecture to students He s never annoying or arrogant unless he means to be , but wise, a bit frayed from the road, and a journeyman craftsman.There s plenty on both the craft what you get down on paper and how you present it and also the life of being a writer someone who notices things and procrastinates and has long talks in their head.Block not only offershelpful insight than most books on writing, but there s also tips on areas rarely touched on, as in how to use dialogue in pivotal scenes, different kinds of adjectives in different povs, and visualizing details and yet not using them.Everything is solid and useful, with plenty of examples There s also a great introduction by Sue Grafton that s inspirational in itself, and she says she d read this book each time before she started her early novels.To sum up, it s an excellent, candid resource for beginners and advanced writers alike, and highly recommended

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