Conrad in the Nineteenth Century PDF ï Conrad in

Conrad in the Nineteenth Century PDF ï Conrad in

Conrad in the Nineteenth Century [EPUB] ✰ Conrad in the Nineteenth Century ✶ Ian P. Watt – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Nothing short of a masterpiece One of the great critical works produced since the s New York Times Nothing short of a masterpiece One the Nineteenth PDF/EPUB ¾ of the great critical works produced since the s New York Times.


10 thoughts on “Conrad in the Nineteenth Century

  1. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    I read Ian Watt s The Rise of the Novel some 25 years ago not having any great interest in the Eighteenth Century English novel, I m not sure why I read it, but, although I don t remember its arguments in any detail, many of its ideas, such as the technical problems the early novelists had in driving a narrative forward while creating realistic in depth characters, have stuck in my mind One important difference between that book and this study of Joseph Conrad, is that the earlier work was r I read Ian Watt s The Rise of the Novel some 25 years ago not having any great interest in the Eighteenth Century English novel, I m not sure why I read it, but, although I don t remember its arguments in any detail, many of its ideas, such as the technical problems the early novelists had in driving a narrative forward while creating realistic in depth characters, have stuck in my mind One important difference between that book and this study of Joseph Conrad, is that the earlier work was re published by Penguin, so, at least in the United Kingdom, it wasn t just addressed to academics and students, but to a broader public Conrad in the Nineteenth Century, as far as I know, has only been published as an academic work, so, while The Rise of the Novel can still be easily found in second hand bookshops, you will probably have to hunt this book out in a library But Watt doesn t assume that his readers will only be other academics and students he doesn t use any of the impenetrable languages of the academia, but writes clearly and directly This does not mean that he patronizes the reader in the chapter on Lord Jim, for instance, he discusses the way Conrad organizes time in complex and technical way After an introduction to Conrad s early life, the book is divided into four chapters, on Almayer s Folly, The Nigger of the Narcissus , Heart of Darkness and Lord Jim The chapter on Heart of Darkness clearly shows Watt s methods the work is placed within Conrad s literary biography Conrad s earlier excursion to the Congo is mentioned possible historical figures that were drawn on for the character of Kurtz are noted the cultural and political ideas of the time that influenced the novel, such as Victorian ideas of progress and empire, are discussed literary movements or traditions that influenced the work, such as impressionism or symbolism , are considered and the work s relationship to the ideas and practices of Henry James are explored Having spent almost 100 hundred pages placing the work in these differing personal, cultural and literary contexts, Watt then spends another 50 pages responding to the text in greater detail The result is a critical method of a wonderful subtlety and fluidity, that can move from close textual analysis to broader cultural contexts, from the solidly specific to the abstract For anyone interested in the works of Joseph Conrad this is a work of continual fascination and, as with all vital critical works, we don t have to agree with all the points to find them useful or intriguing The great sadness about the work is that Watt died before the second volume, a study of Conrad from Typhoon to The Shadow line, was completed


  2. Elisa (The Overflowing Bookshelf) Elisa (The Overflowing Bookshelf) says:

    I ll admit that I didn t read this entire book since I was using it as research for my thesis, but the insight was very helpful towards my research and helped me defend my arguments I specifically enjoyed the comparison between Henry James and Marlow A well written and extensive look at Conrad and his works


  3. Sooj Sooj says:

    Brilliant I will always be sad that Watt died before finishing the second volume, Conrad in the Twentieth Century.


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