Paperback Þ Seven Men PDF Ú

Paperback Þ Seven Men PDF Ú


Seven Men [Reading] ➶ Seven Men By Max Beerbohm – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk In Seven Men the brilliant English caricaturist and critic Max Beerbohm turns his comic searchlight upon the fantastic fin de si cle world of the s the age of Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley, and the yo In Seven Men the brilliant English caricaturist and critic Max Beerbohm turns his comic searchlight upon the fantastic fin de si cle world of the s the age of Oscar Wilde, Aubrey Beardsley, and the young Yeats, as well of Beerbohm s own first success In a series of luminous sketches, Beerbohm captures the likes of Enoch Soames, only begetter of the neglected poetic masterwork Fungoids Maltby and Braxton, two fashionable novelists caught in a bitter rivalry and Savonarola Brown, author of a truly incredible tragedy encompassing the entire Italian Renaissance One of the masterpieces of modern humorous writing, Seven Men is also a shrewdly perceptive, heartfelt homage to the wonderfully eccentric character of a bygone age.

  • Paperback
  • 232 pages
  • Seven Men
  • Max Beerbohm
  • English
  • 16 January 2019
  • 0940322544

About the Author: Max Beerbohm

Sir Henry Maximilian Max Beerbohm was an English essayist, parodist and caricaturist.



10 thoughts on “Seven Men

  1. Manny Manny says:

    Original review A couple of days ago, I reviewed Arthur M Steven s The Blue Book of Charts to Winning Chess , one of the most dismally misguided chess books ever written Unfortunately, the author had spent most of his life writing it I d only borrowed him as a hook on which to hang a Twilight related parody I really must stop doing this , and, overcome by rather tardy remorse, I thought I d go to Google and find out what people had to say about his masterpiece After a few minutes, I gavOriginal review A couple of days ago, I reviewed Arthur M Steven s The Blue Book of Charts to Winning Chess , one of the most dismally misguided chess books ever written Unfortunately, the author had spent most of his life writing it I d only borrowed him as a hook on which to hang a Twilight related parody I really must stop doing this , and, overcome by rather tardy remorse, I thought I d go to Google and find out what people had to say about his masterpiece After a few minutes, I gave up There was almost nothing in the way of comments, and what little I did find was negative Worst of all, the top hit was my parody I felt quite bad for poor Stevens.This evening, while making a cup of tea, I suddenly identified the thought that had been trying to get my attention during the intervening forty eight hours The situation was familiar, and was in fact remarkably close to the premise of Enoch Soames , the lead story in Seven Men Soames is an unknown author, toiling away in 1890s Paris and dreaming of the fame that s surely going to be his one day But it s dreadfully slow in arriving, and he s starting to feel that he ll turn out to be one of those people who are only appreciated after they re dead It would be so nice to be able to know now what future generations will say about him Enter the Devil, who s good at spotting these moments of weakness He offers the hapless Soames a deal he can t resist his immortal soul for five hours in the future, where he ll be able to experience his coming fame directly Soames asks to be transported to the Reading Room of the British Museum On his return, he describes the late 20th century in the following wonderful passage Beerbohm, full of curiosity, is pressing him for details That s right Try to remember everything Eat a littlebread What did the reading room look like Much as usual, he at length muttered Many people there Usual sort of number What did they look like Soames tried to visualise them They all, he presently remembered, looked very like one another My mind took a fearsome leap All dressed in Jaeger Yes I think so Greyish yellowish stuff A sort of uniform He nodded With a number on it, perhaps a number on a large disc of metal sewn on to the left sleeve DKF 78,910 that sort of thing It was even so And all of them men and women alike looking very well cared for very Utopian and smelling rather strongly of carbolic and all of them quite hairless I was right every time Soames was only not sure whether the men and women were hairless or shorn I hadn t time to look at them very closely, he explained.Alas, it transpires that Soames s listless, dejected air is due to the terrible disappointment he has suffered Try as he would, he could only find a single reference to himself in all the library s countless books it was in this very story, where he is depicted as a ludicrous fictional character.Stevens seems to have done slightly better than Soames There is no doubt that he existed, and a few other people have glanced through Blue Book Some copies of it are even available for sale on eBay None the less, I sincerely hope that he didn t enter into any Faustian bargains._______________________________________Postscript, June 2011 I can t believe it, but The Blue Book of Charts to Winning Chess has just been reissued in a new edition God knows what the Ishi Press thought they were doing they publish very fine books on Go, and I ve never seen them print a chess book before.Well, if my reviews had anything to do with this, I m not sure whether to be ashamed or honored Luckily, it s almost certainly a coincidence

  2. Aravindakshan Narasimhan Aravindakshan Narasimhan says:

    A mixed baggage I would have given 3 and a half if I had the option The best of all was the first story Enoch Soames We have our narrator Beerbohm himself being a friend to a writer called Enoch Soames, who for all reasons unknown and best, neglected by all He is introduced as a measured, reserved, a man of some social outlook, yet despised and belittled by all We get a glimpse of his work through the narrator s judgement on the only book he has published One day, when Enoch Soames disc A mixed baggage I would have given 3 and a half if I had the option The best of all was the first story Enoch Soames We have our narrator Beerbohm himself being a friend to a writer called Enoch Soames, who for all reasons unknown and best, neglected by all He is introduced as a measured, reserved, a man of some social outlook, yet despised and belittled by all We get a glimpse of his work through the narrator s judgement on the only book he has published One day, when Enoch Soames discloses his eagerness for fame to the narrator and by chance the devil had happened to eavesdrop the conversation, it wishes to offer a hand for remedy A Faustian play ensues, except that instead of fame, our author is given a chance to fly past to the future by 100 years to check whether he has been posthumously acknowledged of his literary talent The surprising thing about Beerbohm writing was his underplayed description or treatment of supernatural or otherworldly bent Even when we are introduced to the devil, he is a pretty man like figure.Devil, in the words of Beerbohm On one side sat a tall, flashy, rather Mephistophelian man His nose was predatory, and the points of his moustache, waxed up beyond his nostrils, gave a fixity to hissmile Decidedly, he was sinister And my sense of discomfortin his presence was intensified by the scarlet waistcoat whichtightly, and so unseasonably in June, sheathed his ample chest.This waistcoat wasn t wrong merely because of the heat, either.It was somehow all wrong in itself It wouldn t have done onChristmas morning It would have struck a jarring note at thefirst night of Hernani.I was sure he was not an Englishman, butwhat was his nationality Though his jet black hair was enbrosse, I did not think he was French To Berthe, who waitedon him, he spoke French fluently, but with a hardly native idiomand accent.The unknown, other worldliness comes only from his un British qualities or social status at best, not out of his devilish quality.There are five stories along with this, except one story almost all had in variant degrees a touch of the supernatural or fantastic element to it I was wondering as to how the same stories might have been treated by a writer like E.T.A Hoffman it would have been filled with strange, terrifying and frightful characters One just needs to read one short story of Hoffman and read Beerbohm to see the contrast of styles.Even the humor, except for few places, are very much toned down.The second story Hilary Maltby and Stephen Braxton was a very good one too It was about jealousy and envy between two writers with a touch of supernatural element again Even though the element of supernatural is explicit here, like the first story, the writer still treats it withof a psychological angle rather than created by an extraneous element There is a middle ground that is striked between psychological crisis and supernatural occurrence In this story we also get a good glimpse of the aristocratic haughtiness and snobbery of the late 19th century England James Pethel is the third story Reading it, I was reminded of the main character from the French film Bob Le Flameur, directed by Melville Both of them valued passion over prudence The character tends, frequently towards his capriciousness Anyway, It was the most underwhelming story of the book The fourth story is A.V Laider This story had the same theme which piqued my interest in the third story, yet this was handled very beautifully by the writer What starts out as a normal discussion between the narrator and the main character on the subject of metaphysics, drifts to palmistry, and then propels completely off the chart towards a murderous story, and finishes with a touch of ambiguity I am pleased I still haven t disclosed anything substantial in the story The fifth story is Savonarola Brown Another story which didn t interest apart from few eccentricity and indulgence of my own It has a play attached to it as the part of the story, which has a language of middle English and I was enjoying myself with its flowing verses His writing is as if it kisses the surface, even when keeping an eye on details it wasn t directionless except for two stories His language was as if he was caressing over our body with a feather than a regular thump and since almost all the stories were tending towards something suspenseful it was a reaping read His language and narration flows so smoothly that one forgives for a lack of vitality here and there I yet to read his most famous Zuleika Dobson, considered one of the bests of British humor stories I also haven t read any of his essays he is considered foremost as an essayist than a novelist I hope I can enjoy his brilliance in one whole work as a novel than sparks of magic spattered in bits and pieces, like here.Before I leave you, I will share a few good quotes from the book I was glad when, on my second evening, I found seated at the table opposite to mine another guest I was the gladder because he was just the right kind of guest He was enigmatic By this I mean that he did not look soldierly or financial or artistic or anything definite at all He offered a clean slate for speculation And, thank heaven he evidently wasn t going to spoil the fun by engaging me in conversation later on A decently unsociable man, anxious to be left alone I was glad to do so It flashed across my mind that yonder on the terrace he might suddenly blurt out I say, look here, don t think me awfully impertinent, but this money s no earthly use to me I do wish you d accept it as a very small return for all the pleasure your work has given me, and There, please Not another word all with such candor, delicacy, and genuine zeal that I should be unable to refuse But I must not raise false hopes in my reader Nothing of the sort happened Nothing of that sort ever does happen.Then are parrots rationalWhen they regurgitate the thing they hear This fool is but an unit of the crowd,And crowds are senseless as the vasty deepThat sinks or surges as the moon dictates.I know these crowds, and know that any manThat hath a glib tongue and a rolling eyeCan as he willeth with them.I rose again when the wife drifted to my table, followed bythe husband with two steaming plates She asked me if it wasn t aheavenly morning, and I replied with nervous enthusiasm that it was.She then ate kedgeree in silence You just finishing, what thehusband asked, looking at my plate Oh, no no only justbeginning, I assured him, and helped myself to butter He then atekedgeree in silence He looked like some splendid bull, and she likesome splendid cow, grazing I envied them their eupeptic calm Isurmised that ten thousand Braxtons would not have prevented THEM fromsleeping soundly by night and grazing steadily by day Perhaps theirstolidity infected me a little Or perhaps what braced me was thegreat quantity of strong tea that I consumed Anyhow I had begun tofeel that if Braxton came in now I shouldn t blench nor falter.I did not think that in this cloister d spotThere would be so much doing I had look dTo find Savonarola all aloneAnd tempt him in his uneventful cell.Instead o which Spurn d am I I am I.There was a time, Sir, look to t O damnation What is t Anon then These my toys, my gauds,That in the cradle aye, t my mother s breast I puled and lisped at, Tis impossible,Tho , faith, tis not so, forasmuch as tis.And I a daughter of the Borgias Or so they told me Liars Flatterers Currying lick spoons Where s the Hell of t then Tis time that I were going Farewell, Monk,But I ll avenge me ere the sun has sunk.From p 234 of Inglish Littracher 1890 1900 bi T K Nupton,publishd bi th Stait, 1992 Fr egzarmpl, a riter ov th time, naimd Max Beerbohm, hoo wozstil alive in th twentieth senchri, rote a stauri in wich e pautraidan immajnari karrakter kauld Enoch Soames a thurd rait poithoo beleevz imself a grate jeneus an maix a bargin with thDevvl in auder ter no wot posterriti thinx ov im It iz a sumwotlabud sattire but not without vallu az showing hou seriusli theyung men ov th aiteen ninetiz took themselvz Nou that thelittreri profeshn haz bin auganized az a departmnt of publikservis, our riters hav found their levvl an hav lernt ter doo theirduti without thort ov th morro Th laibrer iz werthi ov hizhire, an that iz aul Thank hevvn we hav no Enoch Soamesesamung us to dai And the last quote is one of my favorites for reasons beyond the book Lately, there are many simpletons posing themselves as an authority in politics, films, medicine, and what not My country or the state may be a singular case of this, but nevertheless, it is there and that is a cause for worry I don t understand when did this ultracrepidarianism became a vogue So to quote from the book He said he had looked into it, but, he addedcrisply, I don t profess to know anything about writing Areservation very characteristic of the period Painters would notthen allow that any one outside their own order had a right toany opinion about painting This law graven on the tabletsbrought down by Whistler from the summit of Fujiyama imposed certain limitations If other arts than painting were notutterly unintelligible to all but the men who practised them, thelaw tottered the Monroe Doctrine, as it were, did not holdgood Therefore no painter would offer an opinion of a bookwithout warning you at any rate that his opinion was worthless.No one is a better judge of literature than Rothenstein but itwouldn t have done to tell him so in those days and I knew thatI must form an unaided judgment on Negations Can t say better than the writer I rest my case

  3. Daniel Polansky Daniel Polansky says:

    Five character studies short stories, mostly of writers artists creative types, often with a supernatural bent They reOK Beerbohm had a light comic touch and a lovely name but some of these don t land that well and the one s that do land don t land all that hard I did quite enjoy the first short story, in which a hack writer with pretensions of genius visits the future only to discover his descendants have noappreciation for his talent than did his contemporaries Keep, for the mom Five character studies short stories, mostly of writers artists creative types, often with a supernatural bent They reOK Beerbohm had a light comic touch and a lovely name but some of these don t land that well and the one s that do land don t land all that hard I did quite enjoy the first short story, in which a hack writer with pretensions of genius visits the future only to discover his descendants have noappreciation for his talent than did his contemporaries Keep, for the moment, but it s just because it s an NYRB book and my shelves are bareish

  4. Bruce Bruce says:

    What is it about English wit that is so very unique even when its practitioners are so individual One thinks of such figures as Ronald Firbank, for example And Max Beerbohm is clearly another In this book, a collection of five vignettes or sketches published in 1919, his exquisite, perceptive, and dry satire is brought to focus on individuals so cleanly and clearly that they become for the reader utterly unforgettable, virtual character types or, were one looking at Beerbohm s actually drawin What is it about English wit that is so very unique even when its practitioners are so individual One thinks of such figures as Ronald Firbank, for example And Max Beerbohm is clearly another In this book, a collection of five vignettes or sketches published in 1919, his exquisite, perceptive, and dry satire is brought to focus on individuals so cleanly and clearly that they become for the reader utterly unforgettable, virtual character types or, were one looking at Beerbohm s actually drawings, caricatures Beerbohm has a lightness of touch not easily captured, a satirical way of looking at individuals and society that is so entertaining that it cannot be characterized as cruel, so incisive as to delay the reader s recognition that Beerbohm may be holding a mirror to each of us His turns of phrase can be so adroit and so devastating as to delight the reader even as he skewers the characters he creates In the first vignette, Enoch Soames, for example, Beerbohm begins, When a book about the literature of the eighteen nineties was given by Mr Holbrook Jackson to the world, I looked eagerly in the index for SOAMES, ENOCH I had feared he would not be there He was not there But everyone else was And later, He was a stooping, shambling person, rather tall, very pale, with longish and brownish hair He had a thin vague beard or rather, he had a chin on which a large number of hairs weakly curled and clustered to cover its retreat How can I write about Enoch Soames without making him ridiculous Or rather, how am I to hush up the horrid fact that he was ridiculous This chapter then goes on to detail Soames selling his soul to the devil in order to spend five hours one hundred years hence in the British Library so that he can see all that had been written about him He finds, in fact, no note of his having existed at all.Beerbohm next writes about Hilary Maltby and Stephen Braxton Are these real people or fictional Again, his carefully crafted flippancy, his verbal deftness, his scintillating irony, rapier like, dissects both his characters and the society within which they live, ie us the readers This is writing, writing at its cleverest, pure barbed charm And this vignette is incomparable, the story of two flash in the pan novelists who loath and compete with one another, introducing a biting critique of British aristocracy as well as a delightful extended portrayal of a ghost and a guilty conscience James Pethel is a rathersomber but sensitively written and psychologically penetrating study of a daredevil, Beerbohm writing with his usual flair but somehow a bitpoignant,pensive.In A.V Laider we are privy to the author s ruminations about a fellow hotel guest whom he has not met but about whom he draws conclusions and constructs fantasies, not unlike what each of us is prone to do about strangers with whom we are thrown much in contact The tale becomes a marvelously written description of circular falsehood confession falsehood , winding in upon itself to an enigmatic conclusion.The final work, Savanarola Brown, is outrageously funny, the brilliant capstone to the entire book, the story of a would be dramatist who dies before writing Act V of his masterpiece, Beerbohm being forced to try to complete it by virtue of his being Brown s literary executor The setup to the play is clever, the play itself is absurd, a pastiche of style and quotations from literature ancient and modern, and the entire conceit brilliant, quintessential Beerbohm.This collection of vignettes is well worth reading If one adds up the characters, by the way, there are only six, Beerbohm himself being the seventh

  5. Graychin (D. Dalrymple) Graychin (D. Dalrymple) says:

    More fun with Uncle Max, this time in the form of brief fictional biographies The best piece is the first one, on Enoch Soames who had everything necessary to be a big literary hit in the 1890s, except talent He makes an ill considered bargain with the devil and pays the price.

  6. Hannah Givens Hannah Givens says:

    Seven Men holds five stories, each about a different character and one story about two That makes six the seventh man is Max himself, writing each story as if it s an essay on someone he knows In some cases he s an active part of the story, in others he sof an observer, but this gives us our first sense of the book It s about writers, aspirations, fictions and metafictions, with a sense of humor Enoch Soames, the first story, is my favorite short story It s about a poet and philosop Seven Men holds five stories, each about a different character and one story about two That makes six the seventh man is Max himself, writing each story as if it s an essay on someone he knows In some cases he s an active part of the story, in others he sof an observer, but this gives us our first sense of the book It s about writers, aspirations, fictions and metafictions, with a sense of humor Enoch Soames, the first story, is my favorite short story It s about a poet and philosopher who is desperate to be remembered as a great writer and makes a deal with the devil to travel to the future and see how he is remembered It s the best story in the volume, has Max s character at his most active, and delivers not only themes worth reading but a killer twist.All five are worth reading and especially great in combination with each other They all explore what stories are, ourselves as stories, and our acquaintances as stories that glancingly interact with ours, the feeling we get when we see glimpses of another person s whole life and know it s different from our own Some of them weren t as strong, but a few of them are great on their own, and all together it s a really interesting collection.Full review

  7. Daniel D. Daniel D. says:

    Fantastic short story writing Max Beerbohm brings characters, settings, and events to life with masterful language Each story really captures the essence of the six different men directly portrayed the seventh man is Beerbohm himself, the narrator and participant in each of the stories, who is superficially fun and witty, while also engaging with each story on a deeper level, albeit indirectly The result is a series of fun stories that leave an air of profound mystery after one has read them Fantastic short story writing Max Beerbohm brings characters, settings, and events to life with masterful language Each story really captures the essence of the six different men directly portrayed the seventh man is Beerbohm himself, the narrator and participant in each of the stories, who is superficially fun and witty, while also engaging with each story on a deeper level, albeit indirectly The result is a series of fun stories that leave an air of profound mystery after one has read them, inviting further reflection A joy to read

  8. Adrian Hunley Adrian Hunley says:

    An interesting twist.

  9. Donald Hardy Donald Hardy says:

    Enoch Soames makes the book worth owning Beerbohm is a careful stylist and wickedly funny.

  10. Kate Kate says:

    He had me at Fungoids.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *