Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty & Wilderness

Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty & Wilderness


10 thoughts on “Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty & Wilderness Journals

  1. Susan Susan says:

    I picked up Into the Wild thinking that Christopher McCandless might have something in common with Everett Ruess, the subject of this book The two couldn t bedifferent McCandless and his journey both lack sincerity and commitment and as a result his death waspathetic than poetic or tragic Ruess, on the other hand was a graceful genius and an artist who really meant it He was driven by some kind of spiritual pursuit deeper than I can even comprehend The kid vanished in the dese I picked up Into the Wild thinking that Christopher McCandless might have something in common with Everett Ruess, the subject of this book The two couldn t bedifferent McCandless and his journey both lack sincerity and commitment and as a result his death waspathetic than poetic or tragic Ruess, on the other hand was a graceful genius and an artist who really meant it He was driven by some kind of spiritual pursuit deeper than I can even comprehend The kid vanished in the desert near the four corners in the 1930s, but not before leaving the trail of profound letters included in this book Excellent read, especially if you have spent any time in the landscape where he died


  2. Christie Christie says:

    11 3 09 New update reversing the new findings reported in April on Everett s disappearance Go to www.startribune.com nation 65337832.h LOVERS OF EVERETT RUESS, TAKE NOTE If you have read this book, part of the mystery has been solved regarding his dissappearance For details go to careful if you haven t finished the book, you may not want to check out this news story.Must read Great biography, travelogue and story of a budding conservationist 11 3 09 New update reversing the new findings reported in April on Everett s disappearance Go to www.startribune.com nation 65337832.h LOVERS OF EVERETT RUESS, TAKE NOTE If you have read this book, part of the mystery has been solved regarding his dissappearance For details go to careful if you haven t finished the book, you may not want to check out this news story.Must read Great biography, travelogue and story of a budding conservationist


  3. desertmolly desertmolly says:

    This book was is almost too good to be trueI found a reference to it while reading Krakauer s Into the Wild In the mid Depression year of 1934, Everett Ruess disappeared His last known camp was in the Escalante River region of southern Utah, a place of bare rock, vertical cliffs, plunging canyons, and soaring mesas Most of the book is made up of letters he wrote to his freinds and family, while pursuing his dream of oneness with nature This guy wasn t even 18 when he decided to buy a bu This book was is almost too good to be trueI found a reference to it while reading Krakauer s Into the Wild In the mid Depression year of 1934, Everett Ruess disappeared His last known camp was in the Escalante River region of southern Utah, a place of bare rock, vertical cliffs, plunging canyons, and soaring mesas Most of the book is made up of letters he wrote to his freinds and family, while pursuing his dream of oneness with nature This guy wasn t even 18 when he decided to buy a burro and take off into the wilderness of Utah A dreamer, an adventurer, an artist and a poet who paints a landscape with words so beautiful..so he disappers without a trace in Davis Gulch now flooded by Lake Powell , and the only thing that search troops find are his burros and an inscription he made NEMO 1934


  4. Dan Dan says:

    This is exciting I may actually finally have an opinion about a book I have a respect for Everett, but also a slight disrespect His life as he called it, consisted of spending months at a time in the wild, at the mercy of the good people around him He would meet people in the wild, and get invited to meals Or trade paintings for meals or try working for food He would also get money from Home, 15 dollars allowance here and there He lived for months at a time in the national forest, or the This is exciting I may actually finally have an opinion about a book I have a respect for Everett, but also a slight disrespect His life as he called it, consisted of spending months at a time in the wild, at the mercy of the good people around him He would meet people in the wild, and get invited to meals Or trade paintings for meals or try working for food He would also get money from Home, 15 dollars allowance here and there He lived for months at a time in the national forest, or the Arizona strip.I do respect this individualist spirit The idea of living deliberately ala HD Thoreau I like the thought of being in the woods removed from society and depending on yourself I understand it I know what the draw feels like I ve done it I spent 4 summers in the Tushar mt s, building my own log cabin, making my own soap, sewing my own shirts and climbing spar trees to top them for cabin shingles I can relate and respect the contribution of Everett, yet something in the back of my head keeps nagging at me about these kids, particularly Everett and Chris McCandless Into the wild and even Aaron One Arm Ralston It s this idea of I am going to make it on my own and no one else can come into my wilderness I want the wilderness to be there as much as the next Abbey or Muir, but we all live here It doesn t just belong to one guy with a backpack, or especially one guy with an ATV And I m sorry Mr Rancher, your cattle ranch isn t the original owner either If the American Indians had merely had a better immigration policy you d still be in Wales or Germany You can t keep me out, and you can t claim complete independence, especially when you rely on everything you take with you into the back country Sort of a dichotomy i suppose, you re never really off the grid Even Thoreau lived in a loaner cabin from his buddy But I digress I did have one major serious criticism of this book I love the mystery of the disappearance of Everett, and I somewhat enjoyed the wilderness journals he left us behind But the one thing I cannot tolerate is the fact that his mother prior to allowing his journals get published, sanitized them You will be reading along and as it gets interesting, you see 21 lines erased What What do you mean x number of lines erased What happened How am I supposed to get any insight into the mind of this kid when you have censored out the thought process Unfathomable and very aggravating This was the one major detraction in the book I would totally recommend the Vagabond for Beauty and NOT recommend you waste your time on the Wilderness Journals I rode the mules along the trail today and fished Rain


  5. Brian Brian says:

    Just a fantastic first person look into the life of a true wanderer Reading Everett s letters was a joy I would like to have known him.


  6. Tim Tim says:

    This collection of letters within a narrative about Ruess is quite fascinating IF one has visited the SW canyonlands he wandered through Which means visit Utah, northern Arizona, then read this account.


  7. Bill Brewer Bill Brewer says:

    I read this book after it was referenced in Eric Blehm s great book The Last Season There are many people, doubtless thousands, who are not cut out for daily routine of life most of us adjust to and Everett Ruess was one such individual just as Randy Morgenson the back country ranger Eric Blehm wrote about in The Last Season You could add to that list Willie Unsoeld chronicled in Ascent by Laurence Leamer, and Chris McCandless of Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer.Everett Ruess was one of the early I read this book after it was referenced in Eric Blehm s great book The Last Season There are many people, doubtless thousands, who are not cut out for daily routine of life most of us adjust to and Everett Ruess was one such individual just as Randy Morgenson the back country ranger Eric Blehm wrote about in The Last Season You could add to that list Willie Unsoeld chronicled in Ascent by Laurence Leamer, and Chris McCandless of Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer.Everett Ruess was one of the early ones that bounced from California city life to wandering in the deserts of the Southwest United States making a living by selling pencil drawings and barter They all seem to have a wanderlust that cannot be tamed and they all come to an untimely demise The remains of Everett Ruess are still being looked for almost 8o years after he disappeared in Southern Utah We are able to go on their journeys with them from the comfort of our suburban homes and wonder if we ever passed that fork in the road that would have taken us on a similar journey and in my case, at least, be thankful that I followed a roadtraveled This is good book almost a diary and I recommend it to anyone who has an interest in the outdoors or is seeking justification for a suppressed wanderlust


  8. Kirk Kirk says:

    This should really have been integrated into one book, rather than this stapled together version Vagabond often quotes the journal entries that appear in the second book, and the chronology would have been better established were they combined Rusho would benefit from third party editing for typos, of which there were several Production complaints aside, Ruess story is an interesting one Through his letters, poems, journals, and woodblock prints, we become well acquainted with him and his c This should really have been integrated into one book, rather than this stapled together version Vagabond often quotes the journal entries that appear in the second book, and the chronology would have been better established were they combined Rusho would benefit from third party editing for typos, of which there were several Production complaints aside, Ruess story is an interesting one Through his letters, poems, journals, and woodblock prints, we become well acquainted with him and his character At the end of Vagabond, Rusho thoroughly examines the possibilities of Ruess fate Though all explanations are plausible, the most compelling argument to me is that Ruess view spoiler was murdered and dumped in the Colorado River That the majority of his equipment was left behind, along with his burros, does not suggest that he starved to death over a longer period of time I do not give any credence to the theory that Ruess went to live with the Navajo, or became the Obi Wan Kenobi of the Southwest As Rusho explains, Ruess seemed too reliant upon communication with his family and friends, if only to share his experiences, to suddenly drop off the map without a word hide spoiler


  9. Annette Annette says:

    Through this combined volume of letters and personal journal entries, the last few years of Everett Ruess s life is partially revealed Ruess was a dreamer who reveled in nature, travel, and being outdoors He was also an artist, writer and adventurer who spent much of his latter teenage years exploring the Sierra Nevada region of California and the desert wilderness of the Southwest He often traveled alone In November 1934, the twenty year old Ruess left Escalante Through this combined volume of letters and personal journal entries, the last few years of Everett Ruess s life is partially revealed Ruess was a dreamer who reveled in nature, travel, and being outdoors He was also an artist, writer and adventurer who spent much of his latter teenage years exploring the Sierra Nevada region of California and the desert wilderness of the Southwest He often traveled alone In November 1934, the twenty year old Ruess left Escalante, UT and disappeared into the desert canyon lands to the south leaving behind a campsite, his two burros, and part of his camping gear He was never seen again His life echoed his words, When I go, I leave no trace lj


  10. Erika F Erika F says:

    There s a song Nat King Cole made popular called Nature Boy This is that boy Ever since reading this book, he s haunted me An artist, a truly free spirit, at one with nature, he disappeared into the wild never to be seen again His story is often seen as tragic I see magic in it I imagine him always in wonder, never dying, always young at heart This is a book to hold close, to read and reread In it you might a way to live a life unfettered by convention, or raddled by possessions, or to There s a song Nat King Cole made popular called Nature Boy This is that boy Ever since reading this book, he s haunted me An artist, a truly free spirit, at one with nature, he disappeared into the wild never to be seen again His story is often seen as tragic I see magic in it I imagine him always in wonder, never dying, always young at heart This is a book to hold close, to read and reread In it you might a way to live a life unfettered by convention, or raddled by possessions, or tormented by useless ambition I ve just written a review of another book I love I said I was giving it out for Christmas I shall add this one to it


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty & Wilderness Journals ❰Download❯ ➹ Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty & Wilderness Journals Author W.L. Rusho – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Everett Ruess a bold teenage adventurer, artist, and writer tramped around the Sierra Nevada, the California coast, and the desert wilderness of the Southwest between and At the age of , he mysterio Everett A Vagabond for Beauty PDF/EPUB or Ruess a bold teenage adventurer, A Vagabond Epub â artist, and writer tramped around the Sierra Nevada, the California coast, and the desert wilderness of the Southwest betweenandAt the age of , he mysteriously vanished into the barren Utah desert Ruess has become an icon for modern day adventurers and seekers His search for ultimate beauty and adventure is chronicled in two books that Everett Ruess: ePUB Ò contain remarkable collections of his writings, extracted from his journals and from letters written to family and friends Both books are reprinted here in their entirety.

    Kindle Welcome to the Kindle ereader store books are reprinted here in their entirety."/>
  • Hardcover
  • 448 pages
  • Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty & Wilderness Journals
  • W.L. Rusho
  • English
  • 10 September 2019
  • 1586851640

About the Author: W.L. Rusho

Is A Vagabond for Beauty PDF/EPUB or a well known author, some A Vagabond Epub â of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Everett Ruess: A Vagabond for Beauty Wilderness Journals book, this is one of the most wanted WL Rusho author readers around the world.