Race for the South Pole: The Expedition Diaries of Scott

Race for the South Pole: The Expedition Diaries of Scott

Race for the South Pole: The Expedition Diaries of Scott and Amundsen ❰Download❯ ➵ Race for the South Pole: The Expedition Diaries of Scott and Amundsen Author Roland Huntford – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk In Robert Falcon Scott and Roald Amundsen set sail for Antarctica, each from his own starting point, and the epic race for the South Pole was on December marks the centenary of the conclusion to the the South Kindle Ø InRobert Falcon Scott and Roald Amundsen set sail for Antarctica, each from his own starting point, and the epic race for the South Pole was on Decembermarks the centenary of the conclusion to the last great race of terrestrial discoveryFor the first time Scott Race for MOBI :Ú s unedited diaries run alongside those of both Amundsen and Olav Bjaaland, never before translated into English Cutting through the welter of controversy to the events at the heart of the story, Huntford weaves the narrative from the protagonists accounts of their own fate What for the South PDF Î emerges is a whole new understanding of what really happened on the ice and the definitive account of the Race for the South Pole.


10 thoughts on “Race for the South Pole: The Expedition Diaries of Scott and Amundsen

  1. ^ ^ says:

    I doubt there is any shortage of reviews of Huntford s Race For The South Pole I particularly liked that posted at As I m unlikely to add much revelatory material, I shall restrict myself to a handful of observations.Huntford presents a valid and convincing thesis that the innately practical and tech savvy Roald Amundsen won the race for the South Pole thanks to superior man management and planning skills coupled with a sensitive understanding and I doubt there is any shortage of reviews of Huntford s Race For The South Pole I particularly liked that posted at As I m unlikely to add much revelatory material, I shall restrict myself to a handful of observations.Huntford presents a valid and convincing thesis that the innately practical and tech savvy Roald Amundsen won the race for the South Pole thanks to superior man management and planning skills coupled with a sensitive understanding and respect of nature s unpredictable powers Huntford paints a contrasting and highly unflattering portrait of Robert Falcon Scott picturing him as a man whose mind was firmly embedded in the Romantic traditions of suffering and heroism and who was simply and entirely unsuited to the practicalities of management and realities of the extreme conditions faced by the expedition in hand However, Huntford is not without guilt himself for example when just one example clumsily confusing Petty Officer Edgar Evans and Lieutenant E.R.G.R Evans in the Index to this book p.279, death of An unfortunate, clumsy error, which tarnishes confidence in the author.One doesn t have to read very far into this book before understanding dawns as to the entirely different approaches taken by Amundsen and Scott to the challenge to be first to the South Pole The masterstroke lies in Huntford s brilliant move of laying out the diaries of those two men side by side together with the Norwegian Bjaalan, to balance up the number of words on each side Periodically Huntford adds his observations and conclusions not only on matters of immediate import, but also of what at first can appear to be side issues, but which the passing of time invests with a fascinating importance such as the Swedish invention of the Primus stove in the 1890s without which no polar exploration was possible p.44 Overall, I found this a surprisingly gripping and fascinating read but one which left me wanting to knowabout how, in permanently greater or lesser possession of hindsight, we can ever realistically understand how those who are now long dead actually thought given that our knowledge or lack of and processes of mind and invention can never be anythingthan of our time excepting, I conjecture, those of the atypical genius.Not a book for sentimental lovers of ponies or dogs, which fulfilled a dual purpose


  2. Jenny Jenny says:

    Audiobook version Before I get into the content of the book, I want to make a comment on the narration Bronson Pinchot is a phenomenal narrator His personification of Amundsen and Bjaaland did not represent the best Norwegian accents I ve heard, but he really shone for his voicing of Scott Pinchot s narration was so effective in personifying the condescending, haughty, and petulant words of Scott that I often felt I was hearing Scott himself Just really outstanding voice work.Beyond that, t Audiobook version Before I get into the content of the book, I want to make a comment on the narration Bronson Pinchot is a phenomenal narrator His personification of Amundsen and Bjaaland did not represent the best Norwegian accents I ve heard, but he really shone for his voicing of Scott Pinchot s narration was so effective in personifying the condescending, haughty, and petulant words of Scott that I often felt I was hearing Scott himself Just really outstanding voice work.Beyond that, this book was a fascinating look at the two South Pole contenders on their race to the pole The journal entries alone are fascinating, but I really appreciated the additional context provided by Huntford in between diary entries I wasn t sure what to expect going in, but I found that this book is quite disparaging to Scott and casts Amundsen in an extremely favorable light I mean, it is fairly obvious who wasprepared for the journey, but the lengths at which Huntford goes to point out Scott s folly and Amundsen s foresight is remarkable By the end, you fully understand the outcome of this race to the pole and also get a good sense of the personalities of the two explorers I really enjoyed this book and certainly recommend the audiobook version if you are able to get a copy of it


  3. Justin Zahra Justin Zahra says:

    Considering that there persist serious entities like the National Geographic in making documentaries to bolster the myth of Scott as a heroic martyr, I found the manner in which the book lays out their diaries day by day with pithy technical clarifications to be illuminating The book treats readers with respect and gives them the tools to draw their own conclusions.


  4. Anastasia Anastasia says:

    Salty but so satisfying and informative I have read many books about the Antarctic explorers and this is the first one that goes into detail about Amundsen I guess now I know why there are so many books about Scott and hardly any about Amundsen If you ever wondered why that is I think you will find answers in here.Disclaimer Huntford is clearly biased and does not hide his disdain for Scott page after page But this was an eye opener in many ways If you know of any other books that verif Salty but so satisfying and informative I have read many books about the Antarctic explorers and this is the first one that goes into detail about Amundsen I guess now I know why there are so many books about Scott and hardly any about Amundsen If you ever wondered why that is I think you will find answers in here.Disclaimer Huntford is clearly biased and does not hide his disdain for Scott page after page But this was an eye opener in many ways If you know of any other books that verify his claims let me know, I am intrigued Here are things that set this book apart from others 1 It describes how Amundsen and Scott got into polar exploration and the differences in their upbringing approaches I especially enjoyed learning about Amundsen s previous trips to the Arctic and how he studied the ways of indigenous eskimos.2 It goes into detail about why Amundsen kept his South Pole plans secret and follows the two expeditions in parallel, describing their arrival on the continent, their preparations and their journeys side by side The differences are glaring 3 It sheds a harsh light on Scott s shortcomings and failures, which you will be hard pressed to find in another book If you read my previous reviews of books about Scott Mawson you will find expressions of awe and scepticism about how civil and polite everyone was I found it hard to believe Scott s claims that their winter in Antarctica went without a single argument and how no one ever griped or complained in their private diaries Huntford claims this was the result of posthumous or self imposed censorship and describes conflicts within Scott s party He also sheds a different light on the circumstances of Oates death.4 Huntford reveals something about the deaths of Scott, Wilson and Bowers that was apparently erased from history by Lady Scott when she decided to omit certain parts of his last letters diary entries I would love to verify this through another source, but let s just say that it really put things into perspective.I am glad I read several books of Scott s expedition before this one If you are reading this review wondering whether to pick up this book or not, here is my advice Start with books about Scott s party Cherry Garrard and Wilson s diaries for example Once you feel like you ve exhausted the subject, pick up this book and let your mind be blown Because after you read Race for the South Pole it will be harder to enjoy the British version of Scott s last journey Trust me


  5. Anna Anna says:

    It was really interesting to listen to Amundsen s and Scott s diaries with the addition of Bjaaland s diaries also, on Amundsen s side side by side like this, and Huntford s insights were interesting too I listened to the audiobook, which was well read apparently by an American with a talent for the British Edwardian accent very few slip ups and the Norwegian accents I couldn t possibly comment on whether it was an accurate Norwegian 1910s accent, but it sounded good to me Where this bo It was really interesting to listen to Amundsen s and Scott s diaries with the addition of Bjaaland s diaries also, on Amundsen s side side by side like this, and Huntford s insights were interesting too I listened to the audiobook, which was well read apparently by an American with a talent for the British Edwardian accent very few slip ups and the Norwegian accents I couldn t possibly comment on whether it was an accurate Norwegian 1910s accent, but it sounded good to me Where this book is let down is Huntford s apparent monomania over his hatred of Scott and of the English in general Most of his comments are either glowing praise for Amundsen or scathing vitriol against Scott I m not particularly a fan of Scott and I agree with a lot of Huntford s points, but it s hard to take him at his word when he s so obviously biased It s interesting that he includes the diaries of Bjaaland but none of Scott s companions words, dismissing accounts like that of Cherry Garrard as an immature apologia This is emphasised in the audiobook, where the reader imparts intonation to Scott s words that load it with meanness that may not be there.It s worth reading this to see the diaries side by side, but by all means seek out less biased opinions on the characters of the men involved


  6. Spook Harrison Spook Harrison says:

    Wow The first thing that impressed me was that I m not used to British explorers being spoken of disparagingly in actual, factual, books of historical significance Science fiction, by British authors, will cross that line, but none of my childhood history texts or any serious book even sidled up to it However, the constant comparison of facts by Huntford makes the conclusions reached inescapable Vividly described in the explorer s words the extraction of the tooth sounded almost as fun as Wow The first thing that impressed me was that I m not used to British explorers being spoken of disparagingly in actual, factual, books of historical significance Science fiction, by British authors, will cross that line, but none of my childhood history texts or any serious book even sidled up to it However, the constant comparison of facts by Huntford makes the conclusions reached inescapable Vividly described in the explorer s words the extraction of the tooth sounded almost as fun as activities in one of The Saw movies, and frostbite a similar joy Only the use of the animals keeps this from being a smashing film, and while the animals were brought mostly as tools and then provisions, the fact that each was recorded speaks to the humanity of these people I did enjoy the book, and if I were into geography, climbing, mountaineering, or any of that sort of thing I m certain I would have enjoyed the book evenExcellent work


  7. Allison S. Allison S. says:

    A very balanced journey between Amundsen and Scott s journey to the South Pole through their diary entries The asides to give background or provide additional opinions and facts about the journeys was also not intrusive and very instructive in how things went wrong for both groups the benefits of hindsight basically in small asides Definitely recommend for those who are curious about our 7th continent.


  8. Phil Phil says:

    A very interesting read This book shows how two groups with the same goal go about taking on a challenge to be the first at the South Pole Also it shows how different leadership styles can make or break an expedition.


  9. Dana Dana says:

    Olav Olavsson Bjaaland was my great uncle so it was fascinating to read his diary I grew up with stories about the polar expedition and my mother met him in 1952 for the Winter Olympics Olav was honored by lightning the torch in Morgedal to start the torch relay to Oslo.


  10. Joe Cox Joe Cox says:

    I richly enjoyed this book and could feel the elation of Admunsen as well as biting defeat of Scott Well told though it is clear of what the authors biases bear witness.


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