Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time

Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time

Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time Forgot [Read] ➵ Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time Forgot By Ken McGoogan – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk John Rae s accomplishments, surpassing all nineteenth century Arctic explorers, were worthy of honors and international fame No explorer even approached Rae s prolific record , miles surveyed of uncha The Story eBook ✓ John Rae s accomplishments, surpassing all nineteenth century Arctic explorers, were worthy of honors and international fame No explorer even approached Rae s prolific record , miles surveyed of uncharted territory , miles hiked on snowshoes and , miles navigated Fatal Passage: ePUB Ò in small boats Yet, he was denied fair recognition of his discoveries because he dared to utter the truth about the fate of Sir John Franklin and his crew, Rae s predecessors in the far north Author Ken McGoogan vividly narrates Passage: The Story ePUB ✓ the astonishing adventures of Rae, who found the last link to the Northwest Passage and uncovered the grisly truth about the cannibalism of Franklin and his crew A bitter smear campaign by Franklin s supporters would deny Rae his knighthood and bury him in ignominy for over one hundred and fifty years Ken McGoogan s passion to secure justice for a true North American hero in this revelatory book produces a completely original and compelling portrait that elevates Rae to his rightful place as one of history s greatest explorers.


10 thoughts on “Fatal Passage: The Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time Forgot

  1. Nathan Nathan says:

    This is the biography of the Arctic explorer, discoverer of the final link in the Northwest passage and that of the fate of Sir John Franklin s failed expedition, Dr John Rae.Author Ken McGoogan brings Rae s character to life by describing his incredible feats of exploration in detail, including many passages from Arctic historians, illustrations of landscapes, maps and characters, and many quotes taken from the journals of Rae himself The man was an expert hunter, geographer, leader, outdoors This is the biography of the Arctic explorer, discoverer of the final link in the Northwest passage and that of the fate of Sir John Franklin s failed expedition, Dr John Rae.Author Ken McGoogan brings Rae s character to life by describing his incredible feats of exploration in detail, including many passages from Arctic historians, illustrations of landscapes, maps and characters, and many quotes taken from the journals of Rae himself The man was an expert hunter, geographer, leader, outdoorsman and traveler, by land or sea He traveledthan 23,000 miles and surveyed 1,751 miles of uncharted territory nearly all of it arctic coastline , all in the span of nine years 1846 to 1854 Rae personified endurance, integrity and achievement John Rae was ahead of his time in many ways he was open minded and eager to work with the Inuit, Metis and other First Nations people, learning survival skills from them and counting on them during his expeditions He refused to accept the unconditional superiority of the British people, and was dutifully honest and openly critical of their exploratory outcomes These were critically taboo behaviours in the 1800s and they ultimately cost Rae his much deserved glory from his greatest achievements.As incredible as his physical feats were, Rae s greatest feat was the discovery of the fate of Sir John Franklin and his failed expedition information he had acquired and verified from the dependable Inuit of the area After learning that Franklin and his men had all died, with some resorting to cannibalism, Rae dutifully shared the details with his superiors in England he had also purchased items from the Inuit which were recovered from Franklin s wreck, further validating the story When his confidential report of Sir Franklin s failure got out to the public and were published in the national newspaper, the romanticized image of British arctic exploration was shattered Such revelations attacked the character of the deceased Franklin and his widowed wife, the British Navy who launched the expedition, and the superiority complex of the entire British empire Rather than accepting the horrible truth, the elitist class, Crown and navy all turned against Rae, with the widowed and politically powerful Lady Jane Franklin leading the campaign So powerful was her influence, and so imperative was the nation s need to save face, that Rae s character and accomplishments most importantly his discovery of the final link in the Northwest passage were denied, distorted and discredited Thus, history would go down as Sir John Franklin being the discoverer of the final Northwest passage link, and all major arctic explorers except Rae being knighted But the truth remained, and has been verified time and time again albeit after Rae s passing in 1893 , that it was Dr Rae who solved the Franklin mystery and completed the Northwest passage In short, Fatal Passage is a restoration of the incredible Dr John Rae, The Arctic Hero time forgot It s a must read for anyone interested in arctic exploration, the Northwest passage, the politics of exploration, and historical personifications of endurance and integrity


  2. Paul Weiss Paul Weiss says:

    The story of John Rae wait, who s John Rae When one thinks of Arctic travel, the names that probably come to your mind first are Scott, Peary, Shackleton, Amundsen, Henry Hudson, Davis and, of course, Sir John Franklin.Wait a minute what about John RaeJohn Raeyou sayWho s John Rae Well, exactly One might say that this is precisely the point of the book Ken McGoogan s Fatal Passage is a thrilling biography of John Rae who is probably the least known, least understood and lea The story of John Rae wait, who s John Rae When one thinks of Arctic travel, the names that probably come to your mind first are Scott, Peary, Shackleton, Amundsen, Henry Hudson, Davis and, of course, Sir John Franklin.Wait a minute what about John RaeJohn Raeyou sayWho s John Rae Well, exactly One might say that this is precisely the point of the book Ken McGoogan s Fatal Passage is a thrilling biography of John Rae who is probably the least known, least understood and least respected Arctic explorer in history but he is also arguably the finest, the strongest, most accomplished, most extraordinary and most skilled white man to ever set foot into Canada s far north The list of his accomplishments, frankly, beggars the imagination Endowed with almost superhuman physical strength and endurance, he led four major Arctic expeditions travelingthan 23,000 miles Educated in Orkney as a medical man, he essentially taught himself the mechanics of surveying and cartography Having done so, he then proceeded to accurately survey over 1,700 miles of unexplored territory includingthan 1,500 miles of Canada s northern coastline Demonstrating unparalleled stamina, resourcefulness and resilience, he trekked over 6,500 miles in the Arctic alone, most of it on snowshoes with a fully loaded pack and sledge, and he traveled an additional 6,600 miles in canoe and small boats Whether alone or leading a group of men, he traveled light and fast often walking 30 to 40 miles per day on snowshoes, in frigid temperatures with that fully loaded pack, mind you.In a career of exploration spanning almost twenty years as a doctor in the employ of the Hudson s Bay Company, he lost but one man during his travels and that was due to accident nary a single fatality due to illness, malnutrition or starvation, murder, hypothermia or mismanagement True to his character, he regretted the loss of that single man to his dying day.But that wasn t enough In the course of these travels, he also solved the two greatest Arctic mysteries of the day the fate of the doomed Franklin expedition and the location of the final navigable link in the fabled Northwest Passage.Despite this unmatched record of accomplishment, John Rae passed away in England never having been truly acknowledged, recognized and rewarded by his peers He received no knighthood He had to fight and struggle to receive even the Hudson s Bay Company compensation that was his due He struggled against the lifelong bitter animosity and unreasoning hatred of Lady Jane Franklin He was even soundly criticized for livinglike a savage in snow houses and so forth This behaviour did not seem cricket to the British public the object of polar exploration was to explore properly and not to evade the hazards of the game through the vulgar subterfuge of going native Fatal Passage is exciting history written with an enthusiasm and a flair that easily rivals the style of Pierre Berton, one of Canada s favourite home grown historians I certainly hope that Ken will direct his writing skill to further subjects in the pantheon of Canadian history Goodness knows, we could stand to applaud ourselves and our past muchloudly than we are typically wont to do.Count me a fan, Mr McGoogan Well done and highly recommended.Paul Weiss


  3. Clare Clare says:

    My son who loves history recommended this book to me It is the story of John Rae, an amazing Arctic adventurer This book is rich in detail and characterization I could almost imagine being by Rae s side as he walked 50 miles in the wilds of the northern hemisphere, as he befriended the local native population, and learned over the years the best way to navigate in the unforgiving wilderness of the North Pole area I felt as if I were with him and his intrepid crews as they sailed the frozen My son who loves history recommended this book to me It is the story of John Rae, an amazing Arctic adventurer This book is rich in detail and characterization I could almost imagine being by Rae s side as he walked 50 miles in the wilds of the northern hemisphere, as he befriended the local native population, and learned over the years the best way to navigate in the unforgiving wilderness of the North Pole area I felt as if I were with him and his intrepid crews as they sailed the frozen waters of Baffin Bay and the Barrow Strait as they searched for the lost Franklin expedition which had disappeared without a trace while searching for the elusive North West Passage which would enable sailing across frozen waterways from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific This book definitively answers the question of who ultimately deserves credit for finding the North West Passage as well as who discovered the truth about Franklin and his ill fated crew If you enjoy history and would like to knowabout the exploration of the Arctic, this is a great and entertaining book


  4. David Mcdowell David Mcdowell says:

    Best book I ve read this year thanks Dad Fascinating story of the Orcadian John Rae, Arctic explorer par excellence who was marginalised through snobbery and spite and his discoveries credited to other, less competent men.I recommend everyone read about the real discoverer of the North West passage and the fate of the Franklin expedition This guy was seriously hardcore, learning from the Inuit and surviving the harshest winters by building snow huts and shooting game.Meticulously researched a Best book I ve read this year thanks Dad Fascinating story of the Orcadian John Rae, Arctic explorer par excellence who was marginalised through snobbery and spite and his discoveries credited to other, less competent men.I recommend everyone read about the real discoverer of the North West passage and the fate of the Franklin expedition This guy was seriously hardcore, learning from the Inuit and surviving the harshest winters by building snow huts and shooting game.Meticulously researched and with a compelling story telling style, I was particularly fascinated by the way Rae was shunned by Victorian society for bringing back the truths that nobody wanted to hear Deserved recognition at last


  5. Leslie McNamara Leslie McNamara says:

    A decent, mostly engaging read that highlights the achievements of a dynamic arctic explorer, who accomplished so much in surveying the nether regions of bitter ice and unrelenting cold, making good use of the native people and their ways Traversing on foot, by snowshoe, sledges and canoe, he charted much of the coastline north of Hudson Bay and was among the many expeditions searching for the infamous Franklin ships and crew McGoogan weaves a fine story of adventure, scattered with humorous t A decent, mostly engaging read that highlights the achievements of a dynamic arctic explorer, who accomplished so much in surveying the nether regions of bitter ice and unrelenting cold, making good use of the native people and their ways Traversing on foot, by snowshoe, sledges and canoe, he charted much of the coastline north of Hudson Bay and was among the many expeditions searching for the infamous Franklin ships and crew McGoogan weaves a fine story of adventure, scattered with humorous tales, actual transcripts, maps and photos Though a slightly biased biographical account, which was duplicative at times during the telling, the author also describes this raw land in such a pure voice that you are practically swept back to a time when the land was new and rarely touched by man My middle of the road rating mainly reflects my personal preference for the meat of the book the arctic expeditions rather than the entire account of Rae s life


  6. David David says:

    I remember learning about the race to find the Northwest passage in school, back when the abacus was still in use and just as the book said there was very little, if any, mention of John Rae Reading about the hardships he and his team endured was quite exciting, there were no devastating mishaps or catastrophes, proving that John Rae was as good as his advocates claim at surviving in the wild Afterall, you only have harrowing ordeals if you have bungled things because you are ill prepared I remember learning about the race to find the Northwest passage in school, back when the abacus was still in use and just as the book said there was very little, if any, mention of John Rae Reading about the hardships he and his team endured was quite exciting, there were no devastating mishaps or catastrophes, proving that John Rae was as good as his advocates claim at surviving in the wild Afterall, you only have harrowing ordeals if you have bungled things because you are ill prepared or completely out of your element The Franklin expedition was one such failure While undoubtably a good man, Franklin was completely out of his depth and should never have ventured into the Arctic, losing all hands from both of his ships was the price paid for the hubris of both the British Admiralty and of Lady Franklin Whom convinced Sir Franklin to mount the expedition in the first place, to increase her social status amongst the elite class John Rae admired and respected skill, strength, and knowledge, which lead him to learn survival in the cold north from those that had the most eperience The native tribes of Canada, especially the Inuit His choice of teammates reflected his practical outlook It was not, as many of his detractors suggested, him going native, it was knowing that in order to survive an unforgiving wilderness you needed to have the best and most reliable with you Preferring to hire fellow Orkadians, French voyageurs, Metis, Natives and seasoned HBC men, while refusing the unskilled and often unfit Naval men of the Royal Navy.If you enjoy great stories of bygone ages where life was anything but easy, then you would do well to read this book It takes the reader through a very important time in North American and British history History doesn t have to be pleasant to be important, remember this as you read


  7. Diane Diane says:

    I should have liked this book and there were sections that were very interesting Rae was an interesting person he came from the Orkneys and worked for the Hudson Bay Company that sponsored his expeditions It was interesting to see how different HBC expeditions were from the standard Navy or gov t sponsored expeditions Rae also was the first early to mid 19th century to recognize the value of the native peoples approaches to life in the arctic He was willing to learn from the Inuit and n I should have liked this book and there were sections that were very interesting Rae was an interesting person he came from the Orkneys and worked for the Hudson Bay Company that sponsored his expeditions It was interesting to see how different HBC expeditions were from the standard Navy or gov t sponsored expeditions Rae also was the first early to mid 19th century to recognize the value of the native peoples approaches to life in the arctic He was willing to learn from the Inuit and native peoples and used snow houses and native fur clothing to much advantage He also appears to have judged men I think it was all men on their capabilities not on their social status and paid them fairly for their incredible exertions He also appears to have been a good and capable leader hard to tell because the author is so biased BUT, the author had has an agenda Rae is his hero and I don t think we can write books about our heroes The author wants to exonerate Rae and show how he was maligned by a classist, racist British society and never given credit for his accomplishments This agenda finally made the book unreadable Too bad


  8. Amerynth Amerynth says:

    I generally love polar expedition stories, but I didn t particularly enjoy Ken McGoogan s Fatal Pasage The True Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time Forgot In a way, I understood why time forgot Rae as his story, at least told by McGoogan, isn t terribly interesting.The book is pretty dry and the most interesting bits about Rae come at the tail end of the book I think the book needed to be totally restructured to make it a lotinteresting.Rae, a prodigious walker, organized several I generally love polar expedition stories, but I didn t particularly enjoy Ken McGoogan s Fatal Pasage The True Story of John Rae, the Arctic Hero Time Forgot In a way, I understood why time forgot Rae as his story, at least told by McGoogan, isn t terribly interesting.The book is pretty dry and the most interesting bits about Rae come at the tail end of the book I think the book needed to be totally restructured to make it a lotinteresting.Rae, a prodigious walker, organized several expeditions in the Arctic, several with the design of looking for the lost Franklin expedition, which disappeared while searching for the Northwest Passage Rae never finds the expedition itself, but finds relics and speaks with Eskimos who provide the information that pinpoints where the remains of about 40 members of the expedition can be found However, Rae s conclusions about the expedition upset Lady Jane Franklin so much that she set out to destroy his reputation.All this would be fairly interesting reading but it makes up such a small portion of the book There is a ton of less interesting detail to wade through in order to get to the meat of the story


  9. Leslie Leslie says:

    I had been looking for a book about the search for the Northwest Passage and the lost Franklin expedition I found this title that seemed to wrap those two subjects up in one book John Rae found a strait that would be the final link for the Northwest Passage He also found evidence that the Franklin expedition had been tragically lost in the ice The reason for the three stars The author s hero worship of this forgotten Arctic explorer was obvious, especially at the end where the author and tw I had been looking for a book about the search for the Northwest Passage and the lost Franklin expedition I found this title that seemed to wrap those two subjects up in one book John Rae found a strait that would be the final link for the Northwest Passage He also found evidence that the Franklin expedition had been tragically lost in the ice The reason for the three stars The author s hero worship of this forgotten Arctic explorer was obvious, especially at the end where the author and two others travel to the Arctic to place a plaque in honor of Rae However, that aside, McGoogan tells Rae s tale in a straightforward and non embellished way Since John Rae seemed a straightforward and non embellished type from McGoogan s description, he would have appreciated this account of his time in the Arctic


  10. James Christensen James Christensen says:

    His greatest accomplishments took place on his epic journeys in the Canadian Arctic, filling in the blank places on the map, and the great work he did there stands as his monument But he obtained fame of another andsensational sort when he became the first to cast light on the mysterious fate of the Franklin expedition after Sir John Franklin, two Royal Navy ships and 128 men vanished into the Arctic gloom in 1845 in search of the North West Passage, never to be seen alive again.In terms His greatest accomplishments took place on his epic journeys in the Canadian Arctic, filling in the blank places on the map, and the great work he did there stands as his monument But he obtained fame of another andsensational sort when he became the first to cast light on the mysterious fate of the Franklin expedition after Sir John Franklin, two Royal Navy ships and 128 men vanished into the Arctic gloom in 1845 in search of the North West Passage, never to be seen alive again.In terms of things that matter rather than sensationalism Rae s real claim to fame is that he was one of the first Northern explorers in North America to adopt the techniques of living off the land, i.e of supporting himself and a small party by hunting and fishing to the extent that he was able to stay in the field almost indefinitely


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