Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne,

Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne,


Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne, the Sailor Who Inspired Coleridge's Masterpiece ➨ [Ebook] ➣ Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne, the Sailor Who Inspired Coleridge's Masterpiece By Ken McGoogan ➳ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk In , Samuel Hearne, at just twenty one and already a veteran of the Seven Years War, joined the Hudson s Bay Company, which charged him with the unwieldy task of finding first a famed and long lost co In , Samuel Hearne, at just twenty The Arctic PDF/EPUB ä one and already a veteran of the Seven Years War, joined the Hudson s Bay Company, which charged him with the unwieldy task of finding first a famed and long lost copper mine and then the great Northwest Passage Braving treacherous Ancient Mariner: PDF/EPUB or weather, serious injury, and devastating hunger, Hearne traveled than thirty five hundred miles, much of it with the help of legendary Indian chief Matonabbee, to become the first European ever to arrive at North America s Arctic coast During his harrowing three year quest, he fell in love with Mariner: The Arctic MOBI ó a young settler, observed the infamous massacre at Bloody Falls, and kept a meticulous account of his experiences the first book ever published on the Arctic McGoogan recounts these and many other spectacular and historic events in his characteristically enthusiastic voice, and even argues convincingly that Hearne s chance encounter with Samuel Taylor Coleridge inspired the great poet to compose his epic work Ancient Mariner is illustrated throughout, and maps are also featured.

    Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne, encounter with Samuel Taylor Coleridge inspired the great poet to compose his epic work Ancient Mariner is illustrated throughout, and maps are also featured."/>
  • Paperback
  • 336 pages
  • Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne, the Sailor Who Inspired Coleridge's Masterpiece
  • Ken McGoogan
  • English
  • 10 March 2017
  • 0786714891

About the Author: Ken McGoogan

Is a well known author, some of The Arctic PDF/EPUB ä his books are a fascination for readers like in the Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne, the Sailor Who Inspired Coleridge's Masterpiece book, this is one of the most wanted Ken McGoogan author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Ancient Mariner: The Arctic Adventures of Samuel Hearne, the Sailor Who Inspired Coleridge's Masterpiece

  1. Nancy Mills Nancy Mills says:

    What a fascinating book, about a British explorer in northern Canada who should befamous than he is Samuel Hearne begins his adventures at the age of 12, when his widowed mother travels with him to Portsmouth to be enlisted as a captain s servant for the commander of a ship This is not quite what it sounds in this capacity, the Young Gentleman wasa captain s protege than a servant, and his duties included lessons, with other young fellows, from an onboard teacher his family What a fascinating book, about a British explorer in northern Canada who should befamous than he is Samuel Hearne begins his adventures at the age of 12, when his widowed mother travels with him to Portsmouth to be enlisted as a captain s servant for the commander of a ship This is not quite what it sounds in this capacity, the Young Gentleman wasa captain s protege than a servant, and his duties included lessons, with other young fellows, from an onboard teacher his family was also required to provide him an allowance of 30 pounds annually So it wasan apprenticeship than simply service Young Samuel, a strapping, curious boy who disliked his studies, was insistent upon going to sea.Hearne proved an able sailor but found the navy to be ruthless and brutal After nearly a decade he found himself working for the Hudson Bay Company, and thereafter begin his adventures exploring what sounds like some of the most hostile environs on Earth He matured into a competent writer, learned several native languages, and detailed the customs and features of the American Indians, specifically, the Dene, Cree and Inuit he was also an accomplished artist and his drawings and maps are very charming He was also an observant and accurate naturalist and described the habits of the wildlife in the area, going so far as to wind up with a house full of pet squirrels, beavers and various other adoptees Although too impatient as a boy for school, he became very literate and philosophical as he matured and his writings and actions reflect this.Rather than summarize the whole book, I will comment on 3 points that struck me, particularly.First, of course, is that I don t think many people of our era can comprehend the hardship and great risks these early explorers endured These journeys involved backpacking in temperatures plunging well into the double digits below zero, in areas with few if any trees, carting provisions but still dependent on hunting along the way Hearne and his parties, often only native Americans, went without food for days During the summer seasons, snow, sleet and freezing rain still occurs, interspersed with temperatures, incredibibly, soaring to near 100 degrees, or dropping to near freezing or below, after having been rained on for days, unable to build a fire nor get dry, and with the added torment of clouds of mosquitoes The misery sounds unimaginable Interestingly, while European women were left home, the Indian women not only participated in these expeditions, but were regarded as necessities although the men did the hunting, the women were responsible for just about everything else turning dead game into food and turning skins into clothing and building snowshoes and serving as beasts of burden In these societies, Hearne notes that men, even the lowliest in status, ate their fill before the women could have their share, and at times were left without a morsel Starvation happened At one point during their travels, an Indian woman spent 2 days in painful labor, while the party waited Once she had the baby, onto her back it went and off she slogged with the expedition, through swamp and snow, moaning in pain and still toting her regular burden as well as her baby, although someone else did pull her sledge for one day after her travails Hearne, still a gentleman, expresses some horror at the way women were treated in these societies Haunting him for the rest of his life, according to his writings and accounts of witnesses, was a massacre of innocent Inuit by the Dene party who had been contracted to escort Hearne to a rud rich copper mine and hopefully the northwest passage the British had been fervently hoping to find Coming upon a small family of Inuit, the Dene warriors apparently unleashed their demons on them, brutally torturing and killing men, women, children and the elderly, seemingly for their own amusement Hearne, the only European in the party, was powerless to stop them and was seen as weak for trying to dissuade them The only thing he could do was document the massacre Hearne, and other British travelers, were betrayed, robbed and abandoned by their native American cohorts quite often, it seems casks of rum were hauled inland for trading expeditions it was also customary to offer gifts and by the time it was all over, it turned out the men in charge of the casks had consumed it themselves and replaced it with water Politically incorrect it may sound now, but I can see where frictions might occur when the European and Indian cultures collided.The author s notes at the end of the book a section I usually tend to just skim through is in the case enlightening The author revisits Hearne s childhood town, and the areas of London where he lived after his retirement, while working on his book, and finds out, disappointingly, that the noble and brilliant explorer has been all but forgotten Hopefully this book will help to remedy that

  2. John John says:

    This book isof a 3.5 rating There are lots of interesting stories and information but as someone else pointed out the author s imagined dialogue as opposed to real quotes was a bit annoying But I could see how the author would like to suppose the dialogue would have played out.I remember studying and promptly forgetting about Hearne in school But then it was all about memorizing names, dates and treaties Why can t they make history in school as interesting as it is in this book It r This book isof a 3.5 rating There are lots of interesting stories and information but as someone else pointed out the author s imagined dialogue as opposed to real quotes was a bit annoying But I could see how the author would like to suppose the dialogue would have played out.I remember studying and promptly forgetting about Hearne in school But then it was all about memorizing names, dates and treaties Why can t they make history in school as interesting as it is in this book It really took some strength, mental and physical, to walk the 3,500 miles from Churchill Manitoba to the Arctic Ocean at the mouth of the Coppermine River The cold and damp and hunger that Hearne and his Indigenous guides had to deal with was amazing.He was an interesting man sailor, Hudson s Bay Company man, explorer, naturalist and manythings all of which he recorded only to be published after his death

  3. Jim Morgan Jim Morgan says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book Ken McGoogan brings Canadian history alive and in this book the reader feels very much a part of Hearn s amazing travels.

  4. Mook Mook says:

    I honestly did not know the name Samuel Hearne before picking up this book It took a bit of work to actually read I do t usually read biographies, which is essentially what this book is I wanted to read it mostly because of the tagline the sailor who walked to the Arctic Ocean Hearne s actual life is engaging full of details about life in Britain, his time in the navy, his decision to go work for HBC in Canada I especially enjoyed the latter half of the book where it narrated the life o I honestly did not know the name Samuel Hearne before picking up this book It took a bit of work to actually read I do t usually read biographies, which is essentially what this book is I wanted to read it mostly because of the tagline the sailor who walked to the Arctic Ocean Hearne s actual life is engaging full of details about life in Britain, his time in the navy, his decision to go work for HBC in Canada I especially enjoyed the latter half of the book where it narrated the life of the settlers and the natives who worked together through the fur trade The pictures were a nice touch.Unfortunately the writing style really wasn t to my taste The author made a lot of references to other works in vague mentions that did not really illuminate anything for me There was quite a lot of repetition I don t want to go back and count how many times he mentioned Hearne s love of Voltaire.Did I learn a lot Probably Would I read this again Probably not

  5. Elizabeth Judd Taylor Elizabeth Judd Taylor says:

    Actually a 3.5 I liked this book, but I wanted to like itI think the main problem I have is that I feel a little uneasy when biographers write conversations between people, or tell us what someone was thinking when they could not possibly know ie that someone was thinking only of his wife when he died I understand that in many cases an educated guess can be made, a believable dialogue invented still, it just feels weird to me However, the author obviously has an affection for hi Actually a 3.5 I liked this book, but I wanted to like itI think the main problem I have is that I feel a little uneasy when biographers write conversations between people, or tell us what someone was thinking when they could not possibly know ie that someone was thinking only of his wife when he died I understand that in many cases an educated guess can be made, a believable dialogue invented still, it just feels weird to me However, the author obviously has an affection for his subject, and Samuel Hearne is fascinating If nothing else this bio made me want to learnabout him

  6. Mark Mark says:

    Except for very little actual information linking Coleridge and the Ancient Mariner poem to the subject of the book, this is an interesting read Samuel Hearne seems to have been an extraordinary and overlooked contributor to early European exploration of the North American Continent But other than a few slight references to a poem of Colerdge s which preceded Ancient Mariner by a number of years, it s hard to make the exact connection Read itas a biography of Hearne than as a fan of Col Except for very little actual information linking Coleridge and the Ancient Mariner poem to the subject of the book, this is an interesting read Samuel Hearne seems to have been an extraordinary and overlooked contributor to early European exploration of the North American Continent But other than a few slight references to a poem of Colerdge s which preceded Ancient Mariner by a number of years, it s hard to make the exact connection Read itas a biography of Hearne than as a fan of Coleridge, and you probably won t be dissatisfied

  7. Jim Jim says:

    I read this book some time ago, but it was memorable for the description of native Canadians killing other native people for the fun of it.

  8. Elynn Elynn says:

    Not an overall exciting novel but if you like history and reading about early expeditions of discovery then you would probably enjoy this.

  9. Mark Crowe Mark Crowe says:

    More great Canadian history

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