The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are

The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are


The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition ❮Download❯ ➾ The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition ➼ Author Michael H. Shuman – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Defenders of globalization, free markets, and free trade insist there s no alternative to mega stores like Wal Mart Michael Shuman begs to differ In The Small Mart Revolution, Shuman makes a compellin Defenders of globalization, free Revolution: How Kindle × markets, and free trade insist there s no alternative to mega stores like Wal Mart Michael Shuman begs to differ In The Small Mart Revolution, Shuman makes a compelling case for his alternative business model, one in which communities reap The Small-Mart MOBI :Ú the benefits of going local in four key spending categories goods, services, energy, and finance He argues that despite the endless media coverage of multinational conglomerates, local businesses give to charity, adapt easily to rising labor and environmental standards, and produce wealth for a community Small-Mart Revolution: How Kindle Ø They also spend locally, thereby increasing community income and creating wealth and jobs The Small Mart Revolution presents a visionary yet practical roadmap for everyone concerned with mitigating the worst of globalization.

  • Paperback
  • 285 pages
  • The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition
  • Michael H. Shuman
  • English
  • 07 July 2017
  • 1576754669

About the Author: Michael H. Shuman

Is a well known Revolution: How Kindle × author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Small Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition book, this is one of the most wanted Michael H Shuman author readers around the The Small-Mart MOBI :Ú world.



10 thoughts on “The Small-Mart Revolution: How Local Businesses Are Beating the Global Competition

  1. Emily Emily says:

    Favorite quotes Sustainability requires that every community meet the needs of all its members including plants and animals , present and future, without compromising the needs of other communities meeting the needs of their members, present and future Over the next sixty seconds Americans collectively will spend about 23 million Every one of these dollars carries enormous power because every purchase is essentially a vote It s a vote for a retailer, a vote for the local firms that supply t Favorite quotes Sustainability requires that every community meet the needs of all its members including plants and animals , present and future, without compromising the needs of other communities meeting the needs of their members, present and future Over the next sixty seconds Americans collectively will spend about 23 million Every one of these dollars carries enormous power because every purchase is essentially a vote It s a vote for a retailer, a vote for the local firms that supply the retailer, a vote for the communities where all these businesses operate Unlike political elections, which are so rare and irrelevant that most eligible voters in this country have stopped participating, economic elections never stop Everyone is eligible to participate, even children Every single day, every hour, every minute we are opening our wallets and casting our ballots

  2. Terri Terri says:

    I ended up skimming the majority of this book, so my review is admittedly not fully informed This is NOT a book for the average consumer and not what I expected I learned what LOIS and TINA stand for, and a few examples of how locally owned businesses are competing against global big box giant corporations, but ultimately most of the book s content was steeped in dense business and economic development terminology The book would probably be muchrelevant to students of business, econom I ended up skimming the majority of this book, so my review is admittedly not fully informed This is NOT a book for the average consumer and not what I expected I learned what LOIS and TINA stand for, and a few examples of how locally owned businesses are competing against global big box giant corporations, but ultimately most of the book s content was steeped in dense business and economic development terminology The book would probably be muchrelevant to students of business, economics, and possibly urban regional planning and public policy It might also be helpful to entrepreneurs.One of the small aspects that I really did appreciate was the author s continual cautioning of demonizing of the big box businesses, such as Wal Marttoo easy a target Although these type of businesses may not be as socially responsible as smaller, locally owned businesses, Shuman argues that LOIS retailers can, and SHOULD, still learn from the global giants in order to be competitive in the marketplace Communities interested in reviving its economy and livability shouldn t necessarily be protesting the encroachment of big box stores but rather focus organizing efforts around methods to make existing local businessessuccessful and beneficial to the community

  3. Dave Rothacker Dave Rothacker says:

    I am always trying to learnabout economics Michael talks about a community exporting three or four items and then importing the same from other countries Even someone with limited economic knowledge like myself, knows this doesn t make sense Michael delves into other examples like this and it s why I find the book interesting.What I think the book illustrates, although doesn t neon sign, is theemphasis that is placed on local living, thenatural and organic the business colla I am always trying to learnabout economics Michael talks about a community exporting three or four items and then importing the same from other countries Even someone with limited economic knowledge like myself, knows this doesn t make sense Michael delves into other examples like this and it s why I find the book interesting.What I think the book illustrates, although doesn t neon sign, is theemphasis that is placed on local living, thenatural and organic the business collaboration appears to be And from this blossoms knowledge, learning, ideas and wisdom I am a huge proponent for crossing the boundaries of one s industry to learn from others and the small mart way is an excellent roadmap

  4. Elanna Erhardt Elanna Erhardt says:

    Shuman combines history, economics, and politics to give a striking view of main street businesses in the United States The information is clear, detailed, and well grounded Though I noticed it is missing a view of racial equity In some chapters, absences of race disparities are fairly easy to spot So I will be doing research to fill in the gaps.

  5. Stephen Stephen says:

    Independence has long ceased to be the American credo, supplanted by another efficiency Throughout the 20th century, small businesses supporting towns and families were devoured by larger firms, big businesses who gave little back to the communities they colonized other than an infrastructure burden and a handful of jobs But Michael Shuman holds that it ain t over yet, and in The Small Mart Revolution this entrepreneur argues that the titans have achilles heels and citizens still have a choi Independence has long ceased to be the American credo, supplanted by another efficiency Throughout the 20th century, small businesses supporting towns and families were devoured by larger firms, big businesses who gave little back to the communities they colonized other than an infrastructure burden and a handful of jobs But Michael Shuman holds that it ain t over yet, and in The Small Mart Revolution this entrepreneur argues that the titans have achilles heels and citizens still have a choice A combination of economic study and political jeremiad, Revolution is concise and feisty.Shuman establishes a dichotomy early on this is a story of TINA versus LOIS TINA is the there is no alternative mentality, the approach the United States has taken on in the modern age it is the path of chasing and relying on big businesses for jobs, of sublimating the local economy to the globe LOIS is the alternative, the locally owned, import substituting approach Shuman begins with arguments for LOIS against TINA not only do big firms invariably disappoint those who hunt them, accepting tax breaks and infrastructure put in on their behalf, only to skip town when another city offers an even better deal but the money they produce is lost to the host community A Wal Mart store forwards its take to Bentonville, Arkansas it doesn t invest it in local banks, and most of the wealth is spent elsewhere Money spent at a local firm, however, owed and staffed by locals, is subject to a multiplier effect There are other considerations, like the folly of depending on fragile systems for vital resources Why should a town rely on food shipped in from California when its own fields can produce enough to support the population Shuman is not blind to David Ricardo s theory of comparative advantage that given communities and places are better at doing some things than others, so towns that have fields and mineral deposits might be better off plopping down a mineral using factory on those fields and having the food shipped in from a place that only has food to specialize in This makes perfect sense when thinking about people who want oranges in Michigan the cost of growing them in greenhouses would be prohibitively expensive when they can buy from Florida and California But why should people in Alabama buy pork from the Carolinas when only a generation ago, farms that incorporated livestock and agriculture were the norm There are factors other than cost to consider, writes Shuman shipping food from one side of the continent to the other is a waste of resources and an abusive of the environment, but the chief fact remains that we can t rely on the world s perpetual stability Sooner or later a wrench is going to be thrown into the global economy it may be a financial crisis or peak oil, but disruptions are inevitable Centralization can be efficient up to a point, but decentralization is the option for health and safety Reinvigorating local economies will not only restore vitality to our communities, but is prudent for national security as well.All that is easy enough to say, but how is it to be done Sure, a city in Alabama can buy local food but local shoes Local computers For Shuman, the purely local economy is a hopeless ideal he doesn t wholly condemn big businesses, either, but regards dependence on them as folly If lessons can be taken from their business practices, so much the better, but his mission is to restore vitality to local communities, an impossible task without restoring the local economy After making his initial case, Shuman offers advice on how citizens, small businesses, public officials, national leaders, and even globally minded persons can rely on and expand local economies. Chapters are committed to each, and end with a list of actions each kind of activist can pursue Individual steps are obvious visit farmers markets, use local hardware stores, invest money in credit unions but business owners can ally together in cooperatives to gain some of the advantages of the Goliaths without compromising themselves or their places Shuman also explores territory outside the usual advice by urging people to invest locally, something not easy given legal structures that favor the New York exchange Dismantling the obstacles to helping big business flourish, from zoning laws to financial support for corporations that are wealthy enough to pay for their own parking lots, is also key.This is in short quite an interesting book, of considerable interest to those concerned about the wellbeing of their communities, especially their economies While no community will ever stop participating in the global economy so long there is wind to fill the sails of ships, providingneeds locally is a surer course to curbing high unemployment and staying adaptable than TINA Prudence is demanded, but Shuman offers ways we can restore communities without falling too much afoul of economic reality.Related Strong Towns, Chuck Marohn His blog has commented on growing local jobs rather thanHuman Scale, Kirkpatrick SaleThe work of Wendell Berry, especially Home EconomicsSuburban Nation, Andres Duany et alEaarth, Bill McKibben

  6. Aaron Aaron says:

    I became familiar with Michael Shuman via Youtube where, upon looking for videos regarding community development, I found recordings of some of his public speaking engagements Shuman is a lawyer, an economist, and a business owner He synthesizes his knowledge throughout this text.This was a really good little book The book seemed less to do with how local businesses are beating the global competition andto do with expounding reasons and examples of why it s paramount to support local I became familiar with Michael Shuman via Youtube where, upon looking for videos regarding community development, I found recordings of some of his public speaking engagements Shuman is a lawyer, an economist, and a business owner He synthesizes his knowledge throughout this text.This was a really good little book The book seemed less to do with how local businesses are beating the global competition andto do with expounding reasons and examples of why it s paramount to support local businesses, first and foremost, before throwing way money into large businesses that ultimately siphon money from the local economy To demonstrate his premises, Shuman personifies two competing economic theories For big business and the top down support of its existence enters TINA There Is No Alternative On the other side of the coin, for the good of the local economy there is LOIS Local Ownership and Import Substitution If you re reading this review of this book, you can probably figure out the basic stances of TINA and LOIS Shuman makes exellent cases for LOIS, both in theory and through real world examples I found it to be particularly interesting to learn about major institutions, like Hershey s, as well as the Green Bay Packers, that are, in essence, locally owned businesses, with stocks owned by the community or a charitable trust In this light, Shuman doesn t argue that smaller is necessary as much as the idea that local is best, at least when possible and feasible Local can be big, but the basic idea is that locally based businesses keep,often than not, money in the local economy, whereas dollars spent elsewhere, be it through big box retailers or even small businesses that reside outside your local area, lack the multiplier effect created by keeping a small town or city s monies at home Local business owners tend to live locally, bank locally, shop locally, own property and paytaxes locally 100 spent in a local business stays local longer 100 spent elsewhere quickly andeffectively supports the economy of another region, not to mention corporations that put small businesses under the bus and drive wages down and even bankrupt communities This is a simplified explanation and review of a very practical and convincing text that should serve as an excellent introduction to the importance of buying local as well it may serve as a handbook for grassroots activists and community civic minded individuals who desire to enhance their local economy by focusing on and developing their inherent assets and social capital rather than importing a revenue draining big business that may or may not decide to offshore or otherwise leave town and shut down jobs, devastating communities in the process

  7. Kristi Kristi says:

    In The Small Mart Revolution, we see the battle between TINA and LOIS play out in the pages, with Shuman showing us why LOIS wins No, these aren t two broads in a fist fight it s a battle between a conventional economy built around big business and the logic that there is no alternative TINA versus the viable alternative of local ownership and import substitution LOIS that is gaining acceptance The introduction of this book in which Shuman tackles the idea of Small Mart against the In The Small Mart Revolution, we see the battle between TINA and LOIS play out in the pages, with Shuman showing us why LOIS wins No, these aren t two broads in a fist fight it s a battle between a conventional economy built around big business and the logic that there is no alternative TINA versus the viable alternative of local ownership and import substitution LOIS that is gaining acceptance The introduction of this book in which Shuman tackles the idea of Small Mart against the backdrop of Wal Mart made reading this book immediately worthwhile One of the great things that Shuman executes in this book is not only showing the reader why LOIS can succeed, but also how we as individuals and communities can practically support local ownership, as consumers, entrepreneurs, policymakers, investors, and community builders We even get a glimpse of how LOIS could change the entire global landscape for the better by the end My big takeawaydollars that are spent in the community and stay in the community will make your community stronger The strength of one s own community will only encourage the strength and self reliance of neighboring communities, too If you re interested in economics and the pros and cons of local movements, then I highly recommend this book

  8. Jill Jill says:

    This book is difficult not because of the writing style or the material, but because the solutions provided are nearly all long term and require cooperation Does he not get that we are Americans and therefore require easy, immediate, individual solutions I say thing tongue in cheek, but truthfully this was a stumbling block for me, and probably for others He doesn t waste time pointing this out, which is both a compliment to us and a disservice to the wider acceptance of his book That said, This book is difficult not because of the writing style or the material, but because the solutions provided are nearly all long term and require cooperation Does he not get that we are Americans and therefore require easy, immediate, individual solutions I say thing tongue in cheek, but truthfully this was a stumbling block for me, and probably for others He doesn t waste time pointing this out, which is both a compliment to us and a disservice to the wider acceptance of his book That said, I learned a lot about small businesses and their role in the wider economy and I feel like aconfident supporter of such places and the economic policies that support them Rather than just a general buy local sentiment, I actually can articulate why I support this AND how to think through each choice ex if a local manufacturer purchases parts from China how much better is that than just buying straight from China Anyway, I would recommend it even if you are only mildly curious about this topic

  9. Jay Jay says:

    I really liked this book, though you have to be pretty excited about the economy to get in to it It moved right past Walmart bashing some of the first chapter and argued for keeping as much business and production local and the advantages of keeping money circulating locally He outlines how he thinks that is possible and then branches out to cover all different kinds of business models, investors and even the global economy He doesn t say that everything should be local, but does show how s I really liked this book, though you have to be pretty excited about the economy to get in to it It moved right past Walmart bashing some of the first chapter and argued for keeping as much business and production local and the advantages of keeping money circulating locally He outlines how he thinks that is possible and then branches out to cover all different kinds of business models, investors and even the global economy He doesn t say that everything should be local, but does show how some local business are beating mega corporate rates of return And he has lists for each type of player in the economy and what they can do to support their city or region I m convinced he s on to something and I m moving all my banking to the credit union You should too

  10. Shirley Shirley says:

    The author argues that, in this age of conglomeration, not only is it not inevitable that nonlocal chain businesses will rule the world but that it s actually not good for local communities to be reliant on them e.g., the eggs in a basket problem, when a nonlocal, typically large, company dominating the business landscape in a community decides to leave, despite the huge investments sunk into persuading the business to come and the tax and other incentives the community has been throwing at thi The author argues that, in this age of conglomeration, not only is it not inevitable that nonlocal chain businesses will rule the world but that it s actually not good for local communities to be reliant on them e.g., the eggs in a basket problem, when a nonlocal, typically large, company dominating the business landscape in a community decides to leave, despite the huge investments sunk into persuading the business to come and the tax and other incentives the community has been throwing at this company to induce it to stay The author shows how we can help LOIS locally owned, import substitution businesses, and therefore the communities in which they are based, from various perspectives, e.g., investments, consumption, and policy

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