The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall

The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall

The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall 1477–1806 ❰Epub❯ ➛ The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall 1477–1806 Author Jonathan I. Israel – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Jonathan Israel s , page blockbuster forms the inaugural volume of a new series, the Oxford History of Early Modern Europe, and offers a comprehensive, integrated account of the northern part of the N Republic: Its PDF ☆ Jonathan Israel s , page blockbuster forms the inaugural volume of a new series, the Oxford History of Early Modern Europe, and offers a comprehensive, integrated account of the northern part of the Netherlands over almostyears The Dutch Republic represents the fruit ofyears of research, contemplation and writing, and brims over with interesting detail The New York The Dutch MOBI :Ú Times Book ReviewIsrael performs the great service of charting a path through this literature and presents a coherent and comprehensive picture of the Dutch Republic Comprehensive in scope and yet so clearly and carefully written that it could serve as a textbook for graduate history courses Because it is so thoroughly researched and up to date, it is Dutch Republic: Its Kindle Ø also the kind of indispensable handbook that deserves a place on every early modernist s bookshelf American Historical Review.


10 thoughts on “The Dutch Republic: Its Rise, Greatness, and Fall 1477–1806

  1. Andrew Andrew says:

    The Dutch Republic Its Rise, Greatness and Fall, 1477 1806, by Jonathan Israel, is a book about the rise, dominance, and destruction of the Dutch Republic This state lasted for over 200 years, and at one time was in a dominant position over global trade Historical states like Holland, Friesland, the Gelderlands and such existed in the area before the rise of the Republic, and each had strong historic and political autonomy and a strong sense of culture and independence They often competed fo The Dutch Republic Its Rise, Greatness and Fall, 1477 1806, by Jonathan Israel, is a book about the rise, dominance, and destruction of the Dutch Republic This state lasted for over 200 years, and at one time was in a dominant position over global trade Historical states like Holland, Friesland, the Gelderlands and such existed in the area before the rise of the Republic, and each had strong historic and political autonomy and a strong sense of culture and independence They often competed for primacy in Maritime and river trade with the Baltic and Germany South Netherlands modern Belgium in the 15th century was the centre of power in the region, with cities like Bruges, Antwerp and Brussels dominating the textile industries, and dominating trade with France and Spain The area was controlled by the French house Valois Burgundy under the Burgundian state In this period, Holland began to exert greater influence over the rest of the Dutch states, with Hollander Dutch gaining ground throughout the Netherlands This was due to Hollands relative isolation and autonomy from France and Burgundy, and its central position as the largest state in the North Netherlands.The region was inherited by house Hapsburg, and ruled from Austria, in 1482 The Hapsburg s pursued aauthoritative policy of control in the region, looking at the Netherlands as both a valuable area for taxation and a bastion to defend against an alarmingly powerful French crown This form ofcentral control irked many in the North, and led to increasingly uncooperative political machinations from Holland and other Dutch states The rise of Dutch Humanism, a subtle critique of the Catholic church, the growing interests of Dutch merchants over landed nobility, and the initiation of the Protestant Reformation in Europe all had a major impact on the region The Dutch humanist influence, which espoused atolerant view of other religions, and greater forms of religious freedom for the individual, laid the framework for a Calvinist takeover in the North Calvinist interests, supported by the house Orange Nassau under William the Silent, eventually succeeded in overthrowing pro Hapsburg city councils in the North, and caused unrest in the South In 1579, the North constructed the Union of Utrecht, connecting the provinces of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Guilders, Groningen, Friesland, Drenthe etc signed the Union of Utrecht, seeking collective political integration to promote security, and then in 1581, the North succeeded from the Hapsburg s, kicking off the Eighty Years War for succession from Spain the area had passed to the Spanish branch of the Hapsburg family.This period was one of turmoil in the North, as internal and external forces competed for interest in the Netherlands The Dutch considered a number of option, first setting up a kingdom of sorts internally, then looking for either French or English protection through greater political ties through the promotion of a French or English Duke All options were rejected ultimately, and the Netherlands settled on a Republican system think Rome not the US Power was split between multiple factions, with either a powerful Stadholder controlling the state in semi dictatorial fashion, or the heads of each of the seven provinces forming a countervailing force dedicated to provincial autonomy These political disputes were often disruptive to the Dutch Republic, and led to many instances of paralyzing political deadlock The Treaty of Munster, for example, was boycotted by a number of provinces Zeeland, Gelderland etc due to the negative impact peace would have on their economies This was a common theme throughout the Dutch Republic, and often led to boycotted peace measures, renounced truces and internal political upheaval as each province sought to maximize its own interests above a centralized Dutch Republic Religion played a major role in the Republic as well Calvinism emerged as the religion of choice in the North, but violent iconoclasm against the Catholic church, and the political support of the House Orange, alienatedneutral parties as well as Catholics The south Netherlands emerged as a separate political entity in this time due to its staunch Catholicism, which ultimately led to a greater reliance on continued Spanish dominance The North, however, began to eclipse the South as the economic centre of the region, with Spanish blockades against the North ultimately promoting Dutch overseas dominance in the bulk goods trade fish, salt, timber, grain with the Baltic, and the emergence of competing rich trades spices, silks, coffee, sugar etc as the Dutch sought trade growth in the East and West Indies The Dutch succeeded in supplanting Portuguese dominance of the spice trade in Asia, eventually controlling ports in Indonesia and Ceylon Sri Lanka and made inroads in the West by setting up fur trading posts in modern New York, and in the valuable sugar trade in the Caribbean and South America Maritime trade dominated Dutch thinking throughout its history, and was the main focal point for foreign policy Although the Dutch fought numerous wars with Spain and Portugal and a few with England, France, Germany, Denmark and Sweden for good measure , they largely sought to promote free trade to encourage existing Dutch interests and negate the threat of competition from nations willing to pursue mercantilism policies instead The Dutch collapse was came due to the Dutch pursuit to contain the growing threat of France The Republic forged alliances with both old friends Denmark, England and old enemies Denmark, England and Spain to try and contain French interests in the South Netherlands, prop up the Spanish Hapsburg s in the region, and combat the growing French trade in its spheres of interest This was successful for a time, but ended in failure as Napoleonic forces entered and dissolved the Republic, forming first the short lived Batavian Republic, and later the Kingdom of the Netherlands which survives to this day Before that, Dutch trade primacy was largely being compressed by both Prussian emergence in the East, and English encroachment overseas The Dutch lost many of their trade posts and colonies to England after the dissolution of the Republic, ceding first their North American interests, and then their colonies in South Africa, Ceylon, and parts of Indonesia and Africa, to the English This led to a massive deflation of Dutch trade primacy, and the beginnings of English dominance over global trade which would last for two centuries itself This is an extremely concise description of a dense book on the Dutch Republic Israel has taken into account many aspects of Dutch culture, society, and political and economic factors that led to Dutch primacy and collapse Aspects of traditional historically Republicanism, humanism and Dutch art and architecture are mixed with in depth accounts of Dutch political struggles, the internal politics of the House Orange, and provincial Machiavellian maneuvering The economic factors of Dutch primacy are explored, but briefly, and instead the book focuseson the political aspects of each period in the Republic s history, and why historical events played out as they did Israel has written a massive tome on Dutch Republic politics which is interesting, and an excellent historical account of the rise of a very interesting political anomaly in European history Easily recommended to anyone interested in deeper European history, or looking for a big, chunky history book to sink into


  2. Bojidar Marinov Bojidar Marinov says:

    I am not a big fan of historians who simply gather facts and desperately avoid to see any meaning in history But putting events and facts together to create a greater picture, for those who would later venture to seek some meaning and instruction in a specific time period and a specific historic circumstances, is still a necessary occupation We all profit from it, provided we do not fall prey to the delusion that history can be learned without its meaning for us today Prof Israel does a wond I am not a big fan of historians who simply gather facts and desperately avoid to see any meaning in history But putting events and facts together to create a greater picture, for those who would later venture to seek some meaning and instruction in a specific time period and a specific historic circumstances, is still a necessary occupation We all profit from it, provided we do not fall prey to the delusion that history can be learned without its meaning for us today Prof Israel does a wonderful job in gathering the facts and organizing them in a larger context, thus painting a dynamic picture of the Dutch society between 1477 and 1806 The book is huge but it is worth reading, for those who want to learn about the history of the Reformed doctrine and its practical applications, or for those who want to study the rise of modern capitalism in its very birthplace, or for those who want to learn about the initial steps of the rise of the modern world in general It s a great reading, both for pleasure, and for academic wealth of information and moral instruction


  3. Bram Ridder Bram Ridder says:

    A masterwork which covers a lot of aspects of the Dutch republic before, during and after its golden age I m from Holland myself and picked this book up because I find a lot of people don t have a clue about their country s history and I m happy I did so.The author focuses not only on politics and warfare, but also on art, religion, the various institutions, the role citizens and militia played, nobels, and economics It s very clever written and very, very broad in context.After reading this b A masterwork which covers a lot of aspects of the Dutch republic before, during and after its golden age I m from Holland myself and picked this book up because I find a lot of people don t have a clue about their country s history and I m happy I did so.The author focuses not only on politics and warfare, but also on art, religion, the various institutions, the role citizens and militia played, nobels, and economics It s very clever written and very, very broad in context.After reading this book you reable to place art, architecture, etc in a better context and get a better grasp on contemporary institutions and the way politics work Also it gives a better view on early modern history in Europe and the powers which played a role in establishing the sociaties we enjoy today and their relationships


  4. Ericka Ericka says:

    Ok, for detail, this book is unmatched Superuseful It is not easily portable.


  5. Jeffrey Otterspoor Jeffrey Otterspoor says:

    Took me 6 months to read this huge tome, but well worth it Very detailed and thoroughly researched It could ve used a fewchapters on colonial life, but overall great great book.


  6. Lc Lc says:

    Excellent book about the Dutch Republic but quite a time investment for the 1130 pages Still probably the best English language book written on this period together with Simon Schama s The Embarassment of Riches


  7. Roger Abrahams Roger Abrahams says:

    Een uitstekend boek, waarmee je als Nederlander een veelomvattend relaas in handen hebt over de Gouden Eeuw, met de nadruk op de politiek Ik heb er een half jaar over gedaan, dus nu over naar iets luchtigers, maar daarna ga ik deel twee zeker lezen


  8. Minh Minh says:

    Took me almost a half year to finish reading the book Good but not perfect overview of the Dutch Republic History.In spite of an amount of page, there is still some lack of depth in story telling I.e colonial empire, social, spiritual, educational, political life plots are not equally balanced in the text.The author kept jumping from one personality to another and consequently sometimes, to collect a whole picture about particular individual it was required to go from chapter to chapter.And a Took me almost a half year to finish reading the book Good but not perfect overview of the Dutch Republic History.In spite of an amount of page, there is still some lack of depth in story telling I.e colonial empire, social, spiritual, educational, political life plots are not equally balanced in the text.The author kept jumping from one personality to another and consequently sometimes, to collect a whole picture about particular individual it was required to go from chapter to chapter.And also the snobbish style of quoting French people in the English book about Dutch history in French Kept Google Translate opened in front to read the book.Looking for another book separately about Dutch Colonial Empire


  9. Daniel Polansky Daniel Polansky says:

    I read this book Boy, did I.


  10. Guus Guus says:

    When I read this just after it came out in the nineties I realized I never had considered Dutch history from an outsider s perspective Maybe it would anyway be better, if non natives would write the history books about a country.


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