The Linwoods: Or, "sixty Years Since" in America

The Linwoods: Or, "sixty Years Since" in America


The Linwoods: Or, "sixty Years Since" in America ❰Reading❯ ➾ The Linwoods: Or, "sixty Years Since" in America Author Catharine Maria Sedgwick – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk A story of familial and national discord, conciliation, and redemption, The Linwoods is perhaps the major work of one of the leading writers of early American literature Set during the American Revolu A story of familial and national Or, "sixty PDF/EPUB À discord, conciliation, and redemption, The Linwoods is perhaps the major work of one of the leading writers of early American literature Set during the American Revolution, Catharine Sedgwick s last historical romance addresses issues of virtuous citizenship, civic identity, and the political development of the nation The primary narrative thread tells the story of two families the Linwoods, who are loyalists, and the Lees, who are revolutionaries Much of the novel narrates The Linwoods: Kindle - the transformation of the Linwood children, especially the heroine, Isabella, from Tory to Rebel In the process, Isabella not only rebels against British control of the colonies, but challenges the institution of slavery, gender norms, and patriarchal authority Disguise, intrigues of Rebel and Tory spies, cross racial and cross gender passing, as well as cases of mistaken identity not only make for a compelling read, but also foster an anti aristocratic skepticism of surface appearances and external markers of Linwoods: Or, "sixty PDF Ç virtue and identity that resonated with the rhetoric of Jacksonian democracy.

  • Paperback
  • 448 pages
  • The Linwoods: Or, "sixty Years Since" in America
  • Catharine Maria Sedgwick
  • English
  • 15 March 2018
  • 1584651539

About the Author: Catharine Maria Sedgwick

Catharine Maria Sedgwick was born December Or, "sixty PDF/EPUB À , in Stockbridge, Massachusetts As a young woman, Sedgwick took charge of a school in Lenox She converted from Calvinism to Unitarianism, which led her to write a pamphlet denouncing religious intolerance This further inspired her to write her first novel, A New England Tale With her work much in demand, from the s to the s, Sedgwick made a good living writing short stories for a variety of periodicals She The Linwoods: Kindle - died in , and by the end of the th century, she had been relegated to near obscurity There was a rise of male critics who deprecated women s writing as they worked to create an American literature Interest in Sedgwick s works and an appreciation of her contribution to American literature has been stimulated by the late th century s feminist movement Beginning in the s, feminist scholars began to re evaluate women s contributions to literature and Linwoods: Or, "sixty PDF Ç other arts, and created new frames of reference for considering their work In addition, the advent of low cost electronic reproductions, which became available at the end of the th century, made Sedgwick and other nineteenth century authors workaccessible for study and pleasure.



10 thoughts on “The Linwoods: Or, "sixty Years Since" in America

  1. Megan Megan says:

    I loved this book and Isabella Linwood so much I wanted to name my first born daughter Isabella Then that bitch Bella Swan came along and ruined everything.Seriously though, this is a fantastic novel with great exploration of the ideal woman of the time, and the changing ideal I wrote a huge research paper on it, but I won t bore you all.Worth the read, and I still like the name Isabella.

  2. Edwin Lang Edwin Lang says:

    This historical romance is placed in Boston New York at the time of the American Revolution This was my first, and last, historical romance and unless my fears become reality, and I, not quite a good man, find myself condemned to Hell and doomed to read this genre for eternity The Linwoods, Sixty Years Since is written by the mid 19th Century author, Catherine Maria Sedgwick It is very much an idealized story Washington is near god like there are classic heroes and villains, and shrews, This historical romance is placed in Boston New York at the time of the American Revolution This was my first, and last, historical romance and unless my fears become reality, and I, not quite a good man, find myself condemned to Hell and doomed to read this genre for eternity The Linwoods, Sixty Years Since is written by the mid 19th Century author, Catherine Maria Sedgwick It is very much an idealized story Washington is near god like there are classic heroes and villains, and shrews, and damsels in distress who faint under duress Men seem to be idealized as fundamentally pivoting towards women The author also seemed to wax poetic about the War, and how noble the undertaking War is awful, and perhaps this is the Canadian in me I couldn t stop seeing the Linwood woman and the author herself, in a hijab urging on their sons and families to root out and destroy the infidels the British There seemed a fanaticism in Ms Sedgwick s writing and in her characters that I found disturbing No question the British were silly in their domineering arrogance, as all bullies are, but when one fights an enemy, blood against blood, one risks becoming as awful, as inhumane, as hardhearted and hard headed as one s enemy The Linwoods was nonetheless a gentle story, told in a brutal time, and although she told the story well, balancing the rebels of late 1700 s that is, Washington and his rebels against the British occupiers and their American supporters generally the rich and business people Ms Sedgwick herself was decidedly a patriot one could hear her voice loud and clear It was also hard, maybe again as a Canadian, to see the Americans, a great people and certainly seen as friends by us Canadians, seemingly getting it all so wrong even from the very start My next book, Warlock by Oakley Hall, takes place about 100 years later it is inherently violent and suggests Americans are inherently so In 2013 Ontario elected Kathleen Wynne as our province s first female Premier and the first premier in Canada to be openly gay She had actually left her young family many years ago for her partner, which ironically as a family man bothered me a lot but not enough to prevent me from voting for her To our credit in Canada Ontario her gayness wasn t an issue and she stood for change and we liked that She s about to be elected out now because, I think, once in power she opted for or could only deliver the status quo and her byword became not change but stability So, as a result on one hand sameness, and on the other we had extreme diversity It had a strange effect on the public sector space management mail boxes are in strikingly bright pink not rich mauve or intelligent yellow but glaringly headachy pink The culture seemed to have become strangely FemDom ish, and the message seemed to be not only do we want yes men and women on board but we mandate that our men be castrated too It seems that all our good intentions have gone bad, and this seemed to have come through in Sedgwick s writing too, in the context of the book s subtitle Sixty Years Since in America I read just today that when Charles Dickens and his wife visited America in 1842, roughly around the time Ms Sedgwick wrote The Linwoods, expecting to see the vibrancy inherent in the Founding Fathers American dream that propelled the American Revolution he returned to England dismayed and disappointed It was interesting to see the West mock Vladimir Putin s announcement last week of his increasingly modernized and sophisticated nuclear arsenal because on the projection screen he looked like the Wizard of Oz But I thought I heard behind his jingoism a message that he believes the world is ready for another war, and that it might be something we need, a sentiment I also see emanating from the Chinese President Xi Jinping as well A reset of sorts, a fundamental rethink So, overall then The Linwoods was an ennobling and thoughtful novel Ms Sedgwick seems to call us to bethan we are today, to be people of integrity and honour and to recall and reflect on the ideals foundational to America and for that matter for most of our democracies as well She was a deeply educated woman, took the singles path to devote herself courageously to writing and was a spiritual woman rightfully mocking society s norms even one as young as America was in the late seventeen hundreds and in her own time as well I suspect Ms Sedgwick knew her Bible well and knew that the principles on which Hosea critiqued ancient Israel surely warn us that a society that abandons the needy and any society that prizes ritual over integrity will eventually run aground on its own self absorption It is a hard read but a good one, and I found myself really liking the author, for her skill, idealism, her sense of humour and humility and even her position as a moralist and romanticist.A columnist for our Toronto newspaper The Globe and Mail, Elizabeth Renzetti, wrote an opinion today based on her book Shrewed A Wry and Closely Observed Look at the Lives of Women and Girls that seemed to reflect Sedgwick s heart A man who will whisk a coffee mug filled with mouldy sunflower seed shells from your bedside table with no words further than Good Morning Baby is a man you want holding your hand at the very end When I found this man there was only one left in the shop I married him And Elizabeth Renzetti s comment was also subtitled Young Women Be Large , and I think Sedgwick would have agreed with both sentiments.Edwin

  3. Whittney Whittney says:

    Not a whole lot of depth, but worth the read.

  4. Sarah Sarah says:

    As obscure 19th century women authors go, Sedgwick probably won t rival Margaret Oliphant in my affections, but this had some fun moments.

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