Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees and the

Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees and the

Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees and the Trail of Tears [Reading] ➾ Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees and the Trail of Tears ➵ Brian Hicks – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Toward the Setting Sun chronicles one of the most significant but least explored periods in American history, recounting the little known story of the first white man to champion the voiceless Native Toward Setting Sun: John Ross, PDF/EPUB or the Setting Sun Setting Sun: Epub Ù chronicles one of the most significant but least explored periods in American history, recounting the little known story of the first white man to champion the voiceless Native American causeSon of a Scottish trader and a quarter Cherokee woman, Ross was educated in white schools and was only one eighth Indian by blood But as Cherokee chief in the mid nineteenth century, he would guide the tribe through its most turbulent period The Toward the Kindle - Cherokees plight lay at the epicenter of nearly all the key issues facing a young America western expansion, states rights, judicial power, and racial discrimination Clashes between Ross and President Andrew Jackson raged from battlefields to the White House and Supreme Court As whites settled illegally on the Nation s land, the chief steadfastly refused to sign a removal treaty Only when a group of renegade Cherokees betrayed their chief and negotiated an agreement with Jackson s men the Setting Sun: ePUB ✓ was he forced to begin his journey west In one of America s great tragedies, thousands died during the Cherokees migration on the Trail of Tears Toward the Setting Sun retells the story of expansionism from the native perspective, and takes a critical look at the well rehearsed story of American progress.


About the Author: Brian Hicks

Is Setting Sun: John Ross, PDF/EPUB or a well known Setting Sun: Epub Ù author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees and the Trail of Tears book, this is one of the most wanted Brian Hicks author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Toward the Setting Sun: John Ross, the Cherokees and the Trail of Tears

  1. Michelle Michelle says:

    Well researched, well written, very readable account of the life of John Ross and his effect upon his tribe, the Cherokees Sympathetic without being mawkish Very well done I had previously had a somewhat negative perception of Ross as having tilted at windmills while the people suffered on the Trail of Tears I have a much better understanding of the complexities of the time and the pressures both Ross and the Cherokees were under.


  2. Elgin Elgin says:

    This was an outstanding book I would have given it a 4.5 if possible I liked this one on many levels First and foremost, it is thestory of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokees in the mid 1800 s and the man who worked long and hard for decades to protectthe Cherokee homeland in Georgia and Tennessee It is a very sad and disturbing story about about broken promises, compromised treaties, and racism.It is an embarrassing and shameful account of our countries never ending disdain for a no This was an outstanding book I would have given it a 4.5 if possible I liked this one on many levels First and foremost, it is thestory of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokees in the mid 1800 s and the man who worked long and hard for decades to protectthe Cherokee homeland in Georgia and Tennessee It is a very sad and disturbing story about about broken promises, compromised treaties, and racism.It is an embarrassing and shameful account of our countries never ending disdain for a non white race And unfortunately these kinds of behaviors are still sanctioned by the U S government This was a riveting story..even though I knew how the tale would end, I could not put it down.My only criticism was that the book was pro Cherokee to an absurd degree I have no doubt that the Cherokee were shamefully mistreated, butit is hard to believe the story was as one sided as Hicks writes l would have liked abalanced account For example Hicks mentioned that the Cherokees kept slaves and John Ross had as many as 50 However this side of Cherokee life and beliefs was almost completely ignored.But bottom line read this if you get a chance


  3. Dan Pool Dan Pool says:

    After reading this book, I really hate Andrew Jackson Not that he was the only one dishonorable in his treatment of the Cherokees, but he was one of the biggest Living on some on some of that former Cherokee homeland, I can t help but feel guilty The period this book covers should gettreatment in Georgia and Tennessee schools I grew up within 10 miles of one of the stockades the federal troops held the Cherokees before they started the journey west and very little was ever mentioned of After reading this book, I really hate Andrew Jackson Not that he was the only one dishonorable in his treatment of the Cherokees, but he was one of the biggest Living on some on some of that former Cherokee homeland, I can t help but feel guilty The period this book covers should gettreatment in Georgia and Tennessee schools I grew up within 10 miles of one of the stockades the federal troops held the Cherokees before they started the journey west and very little was ever mentioned of it and the site isn t even marked.One flaw, the author does an exceptional job of making the tale exciting, going to the point that it s almost historical fiction with Ross taking on a first person account The footnotes make it clear that Mr Hicks researched and drew from real quotes in Ross s extensive letters But I would preferred him workingof the attribution in to the text As in Ross told his brother in a letter that he was troubled rather than just Ross was troubled by this


  4. Carl Martinez Carl Martinez says:

    Well written account on the life of Cherokee Chief John Ross, though very sympathetic towards Ross Hicks makes his argument and sometimes I agree others I don t Reading other books, articles, and sources I see Rossof a power mad control freak he would be typical and fit right in with today s Congress Typical of Ross apologists regarding slavery Hicks points out that Ross inherited his slaves true , and most of them stayed with him after being free true again , however point is Ross Well written account on the life of Cherokee Chief John Ross, though very sympathetic towards Ross Hicks makes his argument and sometimes I agree others I don t Reading other books, articles, and sources I see Rossof a power mad control freak he would be typical and fit right in with today s Congress Typical of Ross apologists regarding slavery Hicks points out that Ross inherited his slaves true , and most of them stayed with him after being free true again , however point is Ross did not free his slaves till emancipation, in other words till he was forced to, among other thins I don t put him on the pedestal most historians do Still a really intense, enjoyable book


  5. Tom Tom says:

    Another non fiction author who really wants to write fiction.


  6. Tom Vickers Tom Vickers says:

    the heels of my last post This highly inaccurate irresponsible type of journalism needs to be addressed The three federally recognized Cherokee tribes including American Indian Institutions like the Smithsonian has a duty to espouse truth as recorded by the treaties and O.I.A Office of Indian Affairs as well as the Cherokee Nation agency papers located in Microcopy 208 Record group 75 of the National Archives.There is a federal law that prohibits t the heels of my last post This highly inaccurate irresponsible type of journalism needs to be addressed The three federally recognized Cherokee tribes including American Indian Institutions like the Smithsonian has a duty to espouse truth as recorded by the treaties and O.I.A Office of Indian Affairs as well as the Cherokee Nation agency papers located in Microcopy 208 Record group 75 of the National Archives.There is a federal law that prohibits the misuse of these records.This book Towards The Setting Sun John Ross The Cherokees And The Trail of Tears , By Brian Hicks Atlanta Monthly Press c.2011 Is the common and typical Cherokee Nation history.It however is a story that fails to even closely resemble what happened.This is achieved by not using the treaties that illustrates who the Chiefs were the real Chiefs.In reality,Black Fox,Pathkiller,Glass,Dick Justice,Doublehead,Little Turkey were the top tier Chiefs.In this article the twist that misleads the unwitting reader is the point where Ross,Ridge,Hicks and Richard Taylor enter the story.They were traders Ross , Interpreters Hicks Taylor and 2 nd class Chiefs Ridge This group was selected in 1809 to perform the duties of commissioners and ambassadors in a subordinate capacity to the Cherokee National Council.In this article there is no mention of the authentic Chiefs and Ross and co just appear.They are then hailed as great leaders because they filed in U.S and State courts that led to unprecedented court trials that are referred to to this day.The flaw in this is 1 The Cherokee Nation dealt with the U.S via commissioners in a sovereign capacity.This goes back to the first treaty in 1785 2 Ross and co.were chosen for this role so they were fully aware of the proper functionality of a true Nation.3 They were chosen in 1809 and helped facilitate the removal treaty of 1817.Note how this article try to imply that those who agreed did so as result of bribes.This article from the Smithsonian fails to mention that the Chiefs that went west were Black fox,Glass,Dick Justice,Tohluntuskee,Takatoka and most of the important leaders.This is because from this point on the treaty was supposed to stay open for any tribal citizen to remain and be granted a 640 acre allotment on lands ceded by this treaty or move west to modern n.Arkansas and remain a citizen of the Cherokee Nation.This failed to materialize because Ross,Hicks and others who were not Chiefs following a mass removal went back to Washington with agent Meigs met with president James Monroe who in 1818 met with the immigrating Chiefs telling them he was happy that they finally decided to heed the advice of him and the U.S government by choosing to become established in Arkansas.Ross ,Hicks and others entered into another treaty unauthorized they had no authority.that discontinued the immigration to Arkansas or better the Arkansas Cherokee Territory.They signed away approximately 3 million acres surrounding the Cherokee Nation allowing all surrounding states on the north,east and western boundaries to expand into the Cherokee Nation,all Cherokee s living their were denied their allotments except Ross and about 20 others many of whom in 1819 developed New Town later New Echota,began making laws and consider d themselves the Cherokee Nation government.All who received an allotment were U.S citizens


  7. Elena Smith Elena Smith says:

    This heart wrenching book is story of the Cherokees loss of their native land leading up to the Trail Of Tears It is primarily a biography of tribal leader John Ross, the half white half Cherokee chief who tried every strategy he could think of to preserve their land, including a lawsuit in federal court Ross is a hero who should be remembered for his statesmanship, his ability to strategize and his eventual graceful surrender of a hopeless cause These are the details I never saw in my histo This heart wrenching book is story of the Cherokees loss of their native land leading up to the Trail Of Tears It is primarily a biography of tribal leader John Ross, the half white half Cherokee chief who tried every strategy he could think of to preserve their land, including a lawsuit in federal court Ross is a hero who should be remembered for his statesmanship, his ability to strategize and his eventual graceful surrender of a hopeless cause These are the details I never saw in my history books The book was incredibly well researched


  8. Fredrick Danysh Fredrick Danysh says:

    John Ross was the principal chief of the Cherokee for decades despite his small parentage The work captures his life as well as the struggle of the Cherokee with the United States government over their lands and the expulsion to present day Oklahoma under the Indian Removal Act This migration is know as the Trail of Tears The work is well annotated.


  9. Steven Jacob Steven Jacob says:

    A competent narrative history of the struggle over removal from John Ross s perspective Interesting to me as I m finishing the edits on a novel about one of the actors in the drama Major Ridge Good book If you care about Native American history, check it out.


  10. Matt Peters Matt Peters says:

    Very detailed about the events leading up to the Trail of Tears, but not a full biography of John Ross.


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