Achtung Schweinehund!: A Boy's Own Story of Imaginary

Achtung Schweinehund!: A Boy's Own Story of Imaginary

Achtung Schweinehund!: A Boy's Own Story of Imaginary Combat ✻ [BOOKS] ✯ Achtung Schweinehund!: A Boy's Own Story of Imaginary Combat By Harry Pearson ❅ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk This is a book about men and war Not real conflict but war as it has filtered down to generations of boys and men through toys, comics, games, and movies Harry Pearson belongs to the great battalion o This A Boy's Own Story PDF/EPUB ² is a book about men and war A Boy's MOBI ï Not real conflict but war as it has filtered down to generations of boys and men through toys, comics, games, and movies Harry Pearson belongs to the great battalion of men who grew up playing with toy soldiers refighting World War II Achtung Schweinehund!: Kindle - and then stopped growing up Inspired by the photos of the gallant pilot uncles that decorated the wall above his father s model making table, by toys such as Action Man according to Pearson not a doll and board games such as Escape from Colditz, dressed in Clarks commando shoes and Schweinehund!: A Boy's PDF/EPUB ç with the Airfix Army in support, he battled in the fields and on the beaches, in his head and on the living room floor, and across his bedroom ceiling Andyears later he still is This hilariously self deprecating memoir is a celebration of those glory days, a boy s own story of the urge to play, to conquer, and to adopt very bad German accents, shouting Donner und Blitzen at every opportunity This is a tale of obsession, glue, and plastic kits It is the story of one boy s imaginary war and where it led him.


About the Author: Harry Pearson

Is A Boy's Own Story PDF/EPUB ² a well known author, some of his A Boy's MOBI ï books are a fascination for readers like in the Achtung Schweinehund!: A Boy's Own Story of Imaginary Combat book, this is one of the most wanted Harry Pearson author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Achtung Schweinehund!: A Boy's Own Story of Imaginary Combat

  1. James James says:

    First, I preface this review by noting that I understand all too clearly the seriousness of real warfare and the difference between the entertainment value of war games and the devastation of the actual thing as does this author With that said, for me this book is a sentimental visit to my youth, as well as being seriously funny The author and I are about the same age, and when I was growing up I also became fascinated with military history and war games played with miniatures mine weren t First, I preface this review by noting that I understand all too clearly the seriousness of real warfare and the difference between the entertainment value of war games and the devastation of the actual thing as does this author With that said, for me this book is a sentimental visit to my youth, as well as being seriously funny The author and I are about the same age, and when I was growing up I also became fascinated with military history and war games played with miniatures mine weren t as classy as his, but I painted them and glued them onto little cardboard squares and worked out rules for weapon ranges and effects, lines of sight, and so on To me, one of the most important and fascinating part of history is wondering what the ramifications would have been if key events had turned out differently, and playing war games is one of the best ways to both understand what did happen and explore what otherwise might have.Mr Pearson and I differ in three main respects first, I m from the USA rather than the UK Second, I switched to the Avalon Hill and SPI style board games in mid high school and third, I did go into the military and even made a career of it USMC, active duty, 1976 1996 But I identify keenly with a lot of the experiences he relates and wish I could match his wit and keen sense of the absurdity of it all, especially the people who take themselves so seriously they don t even know they re absurd.It s dry for a spell in the middle in which he relates the history of the hobby of wargaming with miniatures, though very informative but even there his verbal sketches of various personalities are vivid and entertaining Overall I m very glad to have stumbled across this book and recommend it wholeheartedly to anyone interested in the subject


  2. Jur Jur says:

    n the end my parents only have themselves to blame I guess I had just turned 12 years old when we visited the Museum of Amsterdam History where I walked into an exhibition of flat toy soldiers This was wayinteresting than the plastic soldiers that went AWOL at alarming rates in our back garden My father traced the source of the miniatures back to a shop in The Hague, the Boutique de la Grande Arm e, named after Napoleon s awesome instrument of power We went there a few weeks later and I n the end my parents only have themselves to blame I guess I had just turned 12 years old when we visited the Museum of Amsterdam History where I walked into an exhibition of flat toy soldiers This was wayinteresting than the plastic soldiers that went AWOL at alarming rates in our back garden My father traced the source of the miniatures back to a shop in The Hague, the Boutique de la Grande Arm e, named after Napoleon s awesome instrument of power We went there a few weeks later and I found not just flat tin soldiers, but also the round Hinchliffe Napoleonic ranges, which I liked evenAfter a short while I spent most of my Saturdays going to the shop, buying an occasional miniature and watching the older men play and discussing military history.The Boutique was no Friendly Local Gamestore, but a store with a club room attached and only open on Saturday This was a collection of odd middle aged men, with a leaning to right wing politics that I only grasped later I remember my embarrassment when I saw one of the members of the club appearing on television representing a neo nazi organisation and I could only hope my parents wouldn t recognise him.Due to this and the limited room for gaming at the store, a group of younger players started their own club In a few years the Boutique s owner would decide to close and emigrate to sunny France Our club still exists twenty years later.My experience may have been like that of many other wargamers It certainly is close to that of Harry Pearson, who grew from playing with Action Man to plastic soldiers to metal miniatures The first part his book is actually not so much about wargaming but about growing up in 1960s England Apparently it was very boring and narrow, but the war was around all the time in family stories and popular culture Fathers, uncles and grandfathers had all served and fought in the army or navy and the threat of the Cold War was very real.For war gamers the book often comes frighteningly close to our own experiences Upon reading I noted some uncanny resemblances between Pearson s youth and mine Like him, I remember almost drowning in a pond and the long afternoons wandering about the neighbourhood with my schoolmate Gijsbert, playing cowboys and Indians while we eluded the other boys to sneak to the enemy base.Pearson further describes his large collection of toy guns It brought back to me the wonders of the jigsaw, which provided us with wooden toy guns, painted by my brother My brother was always thetalented of the two of us when it came down to handicrafts He built the tanks and weapons for our Playmobil armies.And a few weeks ago I had that moment of instant recognition, stepping into a room in Tate Modern to see the Andy Warhol painting my brother had painted on his 1 20 model plane Later he built a model of a Fokker DXXI after his own design.Although I never could match my brother s skill, like Pearson I provedapt at handling the brush I never becamethan an average painter, but it will do on a wargaming table.This part of Pearson s account will be very familiar to English wargamers There are the pioneers of the hobby, like Don Featherstone and Charles Grant The shows he lists including Crisis in Antwerp are shows me and many of my friends have attended This means it may have less to say to American readers, who presumably have a different experience.The latter part isuniversally recognisable You can read Pearson for the interesting trivia on wargames through the ages, its take off in the 1960s and 1970s and the peculiar characters involved in it There is ample discussion of the way in which wargames have been featured in popular media.But this also the weakest part of the book, as it moves from Pearson s personal experiences to ageneral overview and the omissions stand out It doesn t touch on developments in the 1990s, when technological advances vastly improved the quality of miniature castings Peter Gilder miniatures were already much better than the later Hinchliffes, but Wargames Foundry s Franco Prussian range was really a leap in quality of design and casting Not surprisingly, those designers came from Citadel, the fantasy miniatures company that later merged into Games Workshop Fantasy wargaming and GW is also sorely lacking from Pearson s account, due to his professed distaste.Pearson did a short bit of research on board games, quoting a member of boardgamegeek.com But looking at his activities, this was solely as research for the book and he hasn t returned to the site in ages Its summary treatment makes you wonder why it was included at all.Yet, there are positives here as well When Pearson writes about people he is at his funniest but also at his most perceptive The discussion by two wargamers of how women just don t get it is hilarious And so is the way in which wargamers try to distance themselves from related hobbies, such as fantasy and live role playing, re enactment and collecting I can only confirm Pearson s many stories of long standing feuds and disagreements in the wargaming scene, and at some times I felt I knew who was hidden behind the nicknames.By the end of the book, at last, the stream of loosely connected anecdotes, stories, trivia and observations get tied up Pearson makes fun of wargamers, their mushy clothing, their weird lingo, their obsessive collecting, their feuds and petty disagreements And yet, he loves them Whatever you may think of the style and content of Pearson s book, it is the first venture into what wargaming actually means to those that play it In the end, every man needs a place unto himself, to escape from the dreariness of daily life Or so Pearson thinks But is it really just escapism Is there no fundamental difference between wargamers and stamp collectors, flower decorators and plaid makers In that sense the book is confronting to everyone of us Many of us feel at least slightly uncomfortable at the geekiness of our hobby and the company we engage in To most wargamers, it is a hobby A consuming hobby, but also one that isn t very harmful, although in pacifist circles it was long seen as suspect Wargamers may not always be the most socially apt, they may have weird laughs, lax standards of hygiene we all have stories , bad taste in clothing and a limited range of topics for discussion, but they are generally kind and responsible.I myself haven t been positive always about my gamer friends, but I ve come to realise that there is a part of our lives that we share, rather than just a hobby And unlike Harry Pearson, I do know of many of them whether they have a family and what job they do This is in the end my problem with Pearson s take on wargamers To him they seem to be people sharing the same hobby but little else Something to be embarrassed by and to hide from your cooler friends.But the horrible truth for those that are uncomfortable with this company is that they themselves share at least a number of those traits, and that condescension for fellow players also reflects on themselves And in all these respect the difference between wargamers and boardgamers is very small.When Pearson expresses his unease about being a wargamer, his friend TK retorts We work hard, we don t smoke, we don t gamble, we don t go down to the pub, we don t chase after women and we don t sit in front of the telly all night moaning there s nothing on We have a hobby that s given us decades of fun, helped us make hundreds of friends all over the world and we don t do a drop of harm to anybody What s sad about that And damn right he is


  3. John Montagne John Montagne says:

    Ok firstly, this is ONLY 3 STARS if you are not involved in the subject matter, which is collecting wargaming miniatures and sometimes playing the games they were made for But if this is a hobby of yours, you ll empathize with much of what the author speaks of, and laugh as you find that you ve had similar situations thoughts Only one thing that stands out that kind of rankled me and it is very minor At one point in the book, Harry says that there was a difference between growing up i Ok firstly, this is ONLY 3 STARS if you are not involved in the subject matter, which is collecting wargaming miniatures and sometimes playing the games they were made for But if this is a hobby of yours, you ll empathize with much of what the author speaks of, and laugh as you find that you ve had similar situations thoughts Only one thing that stands out that kind of rankled me and it is very minor At one point in the book, Harry says that there was a difference between growing up in Britain and America after the war WWII , because American boys worshipped their comic book heros and he mentions some of them I think , but British boys worshipped their dads and or uncles grandfathers as heros Not true my own father served in WWII, as did some of my friend s fathers, we idolized and romanticized our forebears involvement in the war and we purchased many American comic books that were equivalent to the Commando series that was published in Britain But from what I recall, this was the only part of the book that disappointed me and that largely a personal matter All in all, if you ve ever been into wargames and or miniatures collecting, this is a splendid read about a hobby that one can easily obsess over In fact, I had no choice but to give this to another miniatures wargamer I know so that they might get a chuckle or two as well I believe that overall, the book not only humorously describes the somewhat fanatic level this hobby can inspire, but also how said hobby can be a pleasurable pastime and act as a medium between collectors enthusiasts


  4. Kevin Godin Kevin Godin says:

    This was a surprisingly fun read from an authour that is new for me If you re a geek, I think you ll love Pearson s confessional tone If you re not a geek, consider this autobiographical journey as a sort of National Geographic guide to the exotic world of wargamming.


  5. Ipswichblade Ipswichblade says:

    Another excellent book by Harry Pearson Full of laughs as he confesses about his wargaming hobby and tries to convince us he is neither a nerd or a geek


  6. Chris Taylor Chris Taylor says:

    A rousing tale of tin soldiersIf you ve ever painted a 28mm soldier or a 1 72 tank, this book is for you A very personal story of growing up with the miniature wargaming hobby, but one that many gamers can relate to A thoroughly enjoyable romp through the history of wargaming and how it relates to life Recommended.


  7. Devin Poore Devin Poore says:

    A funny and informative read Pearson does double duty in both relating his love of war gaming, while telling the history of war gaming miniatures, plastic model kits, and several other activities adults use to hold onto childhood in order to better deal with adulthood.


  8. Edwin Edwin says:

    The book is a personal and funny account of growing up in 1960s and 70s England, surrounded by relatives who d served in the World Wars and reading Commando comics, playing with toy guns, making military models and other war like pursuits he s at pains to stress that these are all imaginary and that neither these games or his later interests glorify or detract from the terrible realities of war On the way he branches off into the history of the manufacture of toy soldiers, Airfix and Action M The book is a personal and funny account of growing up in 1960s and 70s England, surrounded by relatives who d served in the World Wars and reading Commando comics, playing with toy guns, making military models and other war like pursuits he s at pains to stress that these are all imaginary and that neither these games or his later interests glorify or detract from the terrible realities of war On the way he branches off into the history of the manufacture of toy soldiers, Airfix and Action Man GI Joe It s all great fun and a rather enjoyable nostalgia fest even for someone like me, who s a bit younger, never made models and didn t have an Action Man.Unsurprisingly, the boy grew into a man interested in wargaming Now this is where it may be a little contentious I believe that it s a purely generational thing and hardly a surprise given what we ve read so far , but Pearson turns into a fanatically Historical Wargamer and is truly disdainful when it comes to fantasy wargaming and by implication Sci Fi, though he never bring himself to mention it and role playing games Some bloggers have taken issue with this And this is before he gets onto LARPS and re enactors I see it as his own personal stance like it or not, it what he thinks and, as it s his book, he can say it as he likes Personally, I still find the stereotypes he trots out to be funny and do detect a knowing eye winking at me as he does so.But this is only a symptom of a larger problem in the book, which comes out when Pearson goes into the history of wargaming a section which I found fascinating but then I like that sort of thing Pearson obviously feels that there was a Golden Age of wargaming in England not when it was the pursuit of the social elite and professional soldier, but the 1950s and 1960s when wargamers were men who had served in the wars, all seemed to know each other by name, had colourful feuds and found it devilishly hard to get hold of figures Unsurprisingly because that s how nostalgia works folks , this was the period Pearson just missed out on but he knows people who were there So of course Pearson doesn t like Orcs or the Lovecraft Mythos in passing, I m surprised that he doesn t quote what CS Lewis is supposed to have said at one of Tolkein s famous readings to the Inklings Not another f cking elfHe s happiest re playing Napoleonic battles on thirty foot tables over four days with thousands of figures correctly ie, authentically painted Not for him pitching an handful of investigators against zombiesI would heartily recommend his book it s funny and an good read It s probably best if you re 45 or over and don t the pee being taken out of your hobbies When it comes down to it, this is a book about nostalgia and the wargaming section is just as nostalgic as the bit where he s using his granny s walking stick as a sub machine gun This is an edited version of my review the full review, with links and others comments can be seen at


  9. Simon Simon says:

    A book of two halves.As soon as I read the first page, I knew I would enjoy this book From the beginning, the author regales us with witty anecdotes and nostalgia rich observations about life growing up in post war Britain, and the hobbies and games we play An autobiography about somebody you don t know would be dull, but the collection of funny stories are well told as if your friend were telling you, adding those extra details that aren t really connected with the story, but give colour and A book of two halves.As soon as I read the first page, I knew I would enjoy this book From the beginning, the author regales us with witty anecdotes and nostalgia rich observations about life growing up in post war Britain, and the hobbies and games we play An autobiography about somebody you don t know would be dull, but the collection of funny stories are well told as if your friend were telling you, adding those extra details that aren t really connected with the story, but give colour and humour godzilla tattoo anyone Had to stifle laughs on the train quite a few times Then on page 97 the book pivots around a single sentence where the author comes out of the closet TK and I are wargamers Thereupon follows a 100 pages of full on, rather disjointed geekery on the subject of toy soliders and tenuous links between some obscure author s brother s former employer who made some soldiers It s a far cry from the fluid and funny stories in the first half of the book The author manages to pick up the flow again for the last 50 pages or so, but never quite recovers the original form The blurb on the rear cover gives a description of the first half of the book, about a boy growing up playing wargames, but at the end, the author admits, this is a book about his toy soldier obsession.A 3.5 star score would beaccurate The sub story is a cracking 5 star first half but a sub par second half that indulges the author a little too much


  10. Michael Shea Michael Shea says:

    The book provides an interesting background on the history of plastic and metal historical figures and models Mr Pearson is definitely of the historical tabletop wargaming variety He expresses extreme dislike for fantasy and science fiction gaming I certainly saw some of myself in his writing and he brings up some interesting points about the hobby, I do not see eye to eye on all accounts Amusing annecdotes, but at times he assume that you are versant in English culture of the 1970s nor doe The book provides an interesting background on the history of plastic and metal historical figures and models Mr Pearson is definitely of the historical tabletop wargaming variety He expresses extreme dislike for fantasy and science fiction gaming I certainly saw some of myself in his writing and he brings up some interesting points about the hobby, I do not see eye to eye on all accounts Amusing annecdotes, but at times he assume that you are versant in English culture of the 1970s nor does he define certain terms up front, like AFV for ard fighting vehicle


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