Growing Up PDF Ú Paperback

Growing Up PDF Ú Paperback


  • Paperback
  • 352 pages
  • Growing Up
  • Russell Baker
  • English
  • 19 September 2017
  • 0451168380

10 thoughts on “Growing Up

  1. Florence Florence says:

    I found a paperback edition of this book, yellow with age A note from my mother, age 97 and suffering from dementia fell out from between the pages She said it was full of charm and humor and recommended it She was right Russell Baker had a hardscrabble childhood His father s people were Virginians rural people Education was not a family tradition, though Russell s mother always insisted that he make something of himself This man was a great storyteller He makes ordinary life events s I found a paperback edition of this book, yellow with age A note from my mother, age 97 and suffering from dementia fell out from between the pages She said it was full of charm and humor and recommended it She was right Russell Baker had a hardscrabble childhood His father s people were Virginians rural people Education was not a family tradition, though Russell s mother always insisted that he make something of himself This man was a great storyteller He makes ordinary life events seem so intriguing that you can hardly wait to turn the page and see what happens Yes, he was charming and funny and self effacing I m sorry that I missed his New York Times columns but I m glad that I discovered this book, even at a late date


  2. Moonkiszt Moonkiszt says:

    This reminded me of books my mom would read to my dad either on drives or quiet nights at home when everyone was settling in at home that hour or so before we all took ourselves to our beds Full of family foibles and characters, I grew so homesick for my parents who tried so hard and were thanked so little This may be exactly what Russell Baker was trying for to invoke in his readers that which he felt, that maybe.just maybe he should have thanked his mama a little bitThis reminded me of books my mom would read to my dad either on drives or quiet nights at home when everyone was settling in at home that hour or so before we all took ourselves to our beds Full of family foibles and characters, I grew so homesick for my parents who tried so hard and were thanked so little This may be exactly what Russell Baker was trying for to invoke in his readers that which he felt, that maybe.just maybe he should have thanked his mama a little bitThe writing is clear, with an easy view between those words to his life s career It was mild and kept me interested because I m old and like thinking of the past I m not sure this would be interesting enough to someone who wasn t like me old, thinking of the past or related to him or the environs in which he was raised.He isof my parents generation, and I m not sure I even remember anything he wrote while alive or news providers for which he worked we were a family that TV d our news, and by the end of my father s life he was not a newpaper reader Anyway a good book for a reader of a certain age


  3. Jessica Jessica says:

    I read this book in the 10th grade for a school project and fell in love Funny, warm, witty an absolute joy to read Russel Baker is best known for writing a column in the NY Times called Poor Russel s Almanac, and Growing Up is a memoir about his own childhood growing up in 1930 s America He is a real life Charlie Brown, who looks back upon his own bumblings and foibles with humor and grace It is one of my father s favorite books as well, and I feel that pretty much anyone with half a heart I read this book in the 10th grade for a school project and fell in love Funny, warm, witty an absolute joy to read Russel Baker is best known for writing a column in the NY Times called Poor Russel s Almanac, and Growing Up is a memoir about his own childhood growing up in 1930 s America He is a real life Charlie Brown, who looks back upon his own bumblings and foibles with humor and grace It is one of my father s favorite books as well, and I feel that pretty much anyone with half a heart will have a good laugh and be touched by his writing


  4. Caren Caren says:

    For the solar eclipse last month, my family traveled to the friendly little town of Benton, KY, which was in the path of totality I love to visit the public library wherever I may be, so that was our first stop I was drawn like a magnet to a few shelves set aside for an ongoing book sale Hardbacks were a quarter, paperbacks just a dime Well, you can t beat those prices One of my treasures was the autobiography Growing Up by Russell Baker, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1983 I know For the solar eclipse last month, my family traveled to the friendly little town of Benton, KY, which was in the path of totality I love to visit the public library wherever I may be, so that was our first stop I was drawn like a magnet to a few shelves set aside for an ongoing book sale Hardbacks were a quarter, paperbacks just a dime Well, you can t beat those prices One of my treasures was the autobiography Growing Up by Russell Baker, for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1983 I know I read it all those years ago, but it was so long ago, my only memory was of an engaging read So, I read it again and that is something I seldom do I have so very many books to read, I don t usually re read, no matter how much I may have liked a book My memory had not been wrong the book was just as delightful as I recalled Mr Baker who is apparently still alive, now 92 years old was born in 1925, just a year before my mother These were children who grew up during the Depression and those experiences colored the rest of their lives Mr Baker s father died in a diabetic coma before insulin treatments had been developed when Russell was five years old He included his very early memories of his father and his father s people, but the book really centers on his mother The book opens and closes with her as an elderly woman with dementia In between those bookends, his life is unfolded for us in vivid vignettes about all of his colorful family members The family is affectionately but sharply drawn, so the reader almost feels as though she is sitting around the table with them as they have a meal or play cards After his father died, his mother took her two oldest children, Russell and his younger sister, Doris, to live with one of her brothers She left the baby, who was 10 months old, with one of her husband s brothers and his wife who had not been able to have children She made that decision at a time of enormous stress and perhaps later regretted it This meant that Russell s littlest sister, Audrey, was never again really a part of their lives They visited with her a time or two, but she lived in another state and her life was quite different from their own As the years of the Depression ground on,andof his mother s family came to live in the house of her sheltering brother While Russell didn t have a father to raise him, he was surrounded by loving and quirky family members who all pitched in I am impressed at how much Mr Baker remembered fifty years later These impressions ran deep Perhaps one of the parts of the story that brings home the tragedy of the Depression is the account of his mother s budding romance with Oluf, a Danish immigrant, mostly carried on through letters Oluf s letters, as he traveled about looking for work, started out optimistic, but you can read how hope died, bit by bit, until he asked Russell s mother to stop writing to him, as there was no chance they could ever afford to be together She did eventually remarry, when she was about forty Russell was an adolescent by then and was initially resentful of his step father because Russell had been so favored by his mother until then His mother had high ambitions for her only son, which meant she was always pushing him to be , to have some gumption I felt a little sad at how Doris, the child who actually did have spunk, was apparently discounted because she was a girl When Russell didn t sell all of the newspapers left from his route, his sister went back out to the street corner with him and marched right up to cars, knocking on car windows with her tiny fist, selling all of the papers left Her strong personality reached right out of the pages and over the years Russell s mother had been a teacher in Virginia before marriage and children , but after her husband s death, they had moved to New Jersey, which wouldn t accept her credentials She eventually found work in a five and dime store, 12 hours a day, 18 a week The book includes Mr Baker s memories of his unexpected chance to attend Johns Hopkins University on scholarship, of his military career as a pilot for the navy, of how he finally achieved his goal of being a newspaper columnist, and of the courtship of his eventual wife, Mimi The best stories for me though were those of his youth, gathered around the kitchen table with the warmth of his family, seeing the hard times through together This is a lovely book I feel a bit of serendipity to have found my roundabout way back to an old friend


  5. Elle Elle says:

    If you are going to write an autobiography, it helps to live through an interesting time Russell Baker did He was born in 1925 He was a kid during the Great Depression He was a young man during World War II I cannot think of a sweeter set up for a life full of stories Yet nothing interesting ever happened to him With the exception of a few mild characters he met along the way, his formative years were not remarkable After reading Growing Up, I can see why Baker took no interest in the wo If you are going to write an autobiography, it helps to live through an interesting time Russell Baker did He was born in 1925 He was a kid during the Great Depression He was a young man during World War II I cannot think of a sweeter set up for a life full of stories Yet nothing interesting ever happened to him With the exception of a few mild characters he met along the way, his formative years were not remarkable After reading Growing Up, I can see why Baker took no interest in the world around him He had no ambition He didn t think Europe entering into war was big news He is almost proud of his complete ignorance of Leon Trotsky, a man who shaped the time he was living in He had no interest and no plans for the future About halfway through reading this book, I read the back cover and was shocked to learn it won the Pulitzer Prize in 1982 Perhaps I am skewed by the current crop of memoirs Today no one will publish you, it seems, unless you have lived an outlandish life Despite the maelstrom Russell Baker was born into, he led a mundane existence What I view as Growing Up s weakness, critics must view as its strength Russell Baker is an everyman His success lies in his analysis of people that we ve all met and situations that we ve all been through


  6. Edward Huang Edward Huang says:

    The memoir, Growing Up written by an outstanding author named Russel Baker, takes the readers to a nostalgic journey of his life as a curious young boy living in the rural Virginia to a determined writer The memoir starts from a scene of his eighty years old mother lying down in the hospital bed despite being an energetic women in the early days and being a strong advocate of feminism, she has grown old and become senile By looking at his senile mother, Russel recognizes human infirmity and The memoir, Growing Up written by an outstanding author named Russel Baker, takes the readers to a nostalgic journey of his life as a curious young boy living in the rural Virginia to a determined writer The memoir starts from a scene of his eighty years old mother lying down in the hospital bed despite being an energetic women in the early days and being a strong advocate of feminism, she has grown old and become senile By looking at his senile mother, Russel recognizes human infirmity and aging over time, ending up thinking about his past childhood and his overall happy memories with his mother Gazing upon his mother, Russel thinks about his parents and children of his own, wondering about his mother s life and the harsh but blissful childhood filled with passion, hope, and joy In this memoir, there are two main overarching themes One of the themes that are indirectly addressed throughout the examination of Russel s life is the notion of an ideal women According to Russel s mother, men are very uncivilized and are brutes, therefore need women s guidance for their future success in terms of the prosperity of their career His mother, Lucy defines an ideal women s job as to guide their husbands and live virtuous lives by doing their necessities Russel s inexperience with women leads him to believe in the fact that an ideal wife and a girl friend partner are there for separate purposes Another theme that is indirectly addressed in his memoir is the idea of success Half of his life takes place in the era of Great Depression in America where many lose their jobs and are unemployed Throughout Russel s childhood, his mother pushes him to make something out of himself, believing hard work will result in success She wants her son, unlike his father, to have a stable job, earn a living, and be able to sustain a family Russel s life is not always filled with blissful memories He remembers when he ended up bursting in tears after hearing about his father s death There was also a time when Russel was struggling and was deeply depressed not able to withstand the fact that his mother was going to get married with another man due to his unworldliness There were times when he felt sympathy towards his mother, who sacrificed her allowances to buy Russel a beautifully striped green suit When World War II breaks out, Russel joins the naval pilot force and finds himself a girlfriend called Mimi Frankly, Mimi is not an ideal girl in which Lucy has been expecting Lucy, afraid of the fact that Mimi may not devote her life in supporting Russel and because she believed Mimi would not be the best match for his beloved son, she ends up rebuking Mimi In order to stay loyal to her mother, Russel breaks up with Mimi Russel, having his heart broken from their breakup, unintentionally teaches his mother a lesson on the importance of happiness in a person s life Russel s life may not be the most privileged and blissful, yet his mother tries her best to provide him with great memories of childhood and tries to give him the best education possible with the money right out of her pocket From his mother and his step father s support, Russel gets accepted to the John Hopkins University where his momentum of becoming a writer flourishes and develops He gets a job in the Balti Sun as a police writer after graduating If I was a critic, and was to give points on this memoir, I would score it, 5 5 The main reason is because the author does not start the book in chronological order from his childhood to his adulthood like most of the memoirs in the bookshelves, but instead utilizes some rich forms of writing such as flashbacks literary device in order to make the memoirsophisticated and amusing to read The book is highly recommended to those whom are interested in reading about a person s life People who are struggling with their lives and wants to know that they aren t the only ones having a hard time, because the book not only contains blissful memories of Russel Baker, but some dark instincts of human practicality The book is also highly recommended to those who would like to learn new ideas and ways of succeeding starting from the bottom with nothing, and ending at the top, succeeding This richly written memoir not only teaches about life, but the ways on how to act appropriately, and to appreciate your parents Be thankful of what I possess and be thankful for what my parents have sacrificed


  7. Donna Donna says:

    Growing Up by Russell BakerAs with many of the books in my want to read list I ve already read this book and because I liked it so much I wanted to be sure to say so in a review I remember Russell Baker from Masterpiece Theater I always liked his low key manner and humor So when I saw this Pulitzer Prize winning memoir I wanted to read it Baker s mother was a major figure in his life and this story She was a strong woman and would not accept laziness or failure which was a good thing for Growing Up by Russell BakerAs with many of the books in my want to read list I ve already read this book and because I liked it so much I wanted to be sure to say so in a review I remember Russell Baker from Masterpiece Theater I always liked his low key manner and humor So when I saw this Pulitzer Prize winning memoir I wanted to read it Baker s mother was a major figure in his life and this story She was a strong woman and would not accept laziness or failure which was a good thing for Russell His father died when he was 5 years old, his family was desperately poor, and it was the time of the Great Depression Much happened in his life between then and now His humor came through often in this book What comes to my mind is the time in the air force when he had difficulty learning to fly a plane He had only onechance to demonstrate his ability or flunk out Who would have guessed, including him, that the after effects of the previous night s drinking would be the key to his success This book is his personal story but in many ways also that of many people of his generation It s an American story


  8. Patsy Parker Patsy Parker says:

    I enjoyed all of what I read in this book, but unfortunately, it began moving slower than I needed it to I didn t finish it even though I read it many years ago in college for a class I like his humor and honesty, though.


  9. Michael Alan Grapin Michael Alan Grapin says:

    This is an autobiography by Russell Baker that actually begins before he was born In truth it s as much a biography of his mother as it is about him growing up during the depression, attending college against all odds, becoming a pilot while the second world war comes to a conclusion, becoming a newspaper man, meeting the love of his life against his mother s approval and so onlife is a poignant struggle made all theextraordinary by just how ordinary it was I found it thoroughly engag This is an autobiography by Russell Baker that actually begins before he was born In truth it s as much a biography of his mother as it is about him growing up during the depression, attending college against all odds, becoming a pilot while the second world war comes to a conclusion, becoming a newspaper man, meeting the love of his life against his mother s approval and so onlife is a poignant struggle made all theextraordinary by just how ordinary it was I found it thoroughly engaging


  10. Ruth Ruth says:

    This is one of the best memoirs I have ever read a true American experience lived by Mr Baker as well as my parents.


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Growing Up❴Download❵ ➵ Growing Up Author Russell Baker – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk This Pulitzer Prize winner is the saddest, funniest, most tragical yet comical picture of coming of age in the USA in the Depresson years and World War II that has ever been written Harrison Salisbury This Pulitzer Prize winner is the saddest, funniest, most tragical yet comical picture of coming of age in the USA in the Depresson years and World War II that has ever been written Harrison Salisbury.


About the Author: Russell Baker

On August , , US journalist, humorist and biographer Russell Baker was born in Loudoun County, Virginia His father died early on and his hard working mother reared him and his sisters during the Great Depression Baker managed to get himself into Johns Hopkins University, where he studied journalismBaker s wit as a humorist has been compared with that of Mark Twain The only thing I was fit for was to be a writer, wrote Baker, and this notion rested solely on my suspicion that I would never be fit for real work, and that writing didn t require any In , Baker received his first Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary in his Observer column for the New York Times to His autobiography, Growing Up earned him a second Pulitzer In , Baker began hosting the PBS television series Masterpiece TheatreNeil Postman, in the preface to Conscientious Objections, describes Baker as like some fourth century citizen of Rome who is amused and intrigued by the Empire s collapse but who still cares enough to mock the stupidities that are hastening its end He is, in my opinion, a precious national resource, and as long as he does not get his own television show, America will remain stronger than Russia , xii.