A Noite do Oráculo MOBI ´ A Noite eBook Ð

A Noite do Oráculo MOBI ´ A Noite eBook Ð

A Noite do Oráculo [Reading] ➮ A Noite do Oráculo ➶ Paul Auster – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk No dia de Setembro de , ap s v rios meses de recupera o de uma doen a quase fatal, o escritor Sidney Orr entra numa papelaria de Brooklyn e compra um bloco de notas azul de fabrico portugu s Nos nove No diade Setembro de , ap s v rios meses de recupera o de uma doen a quase fatal, o escritor Sidney Orr entra numa papelaria de Brooklyn e compra um bloco de notas azul de fabrico portugu s Nos nove dias que se seguem, Sidney vai viver A Noite eBook Ð sob a influ ncia do livro em branco, preso num universo de arrepiantes premoni es e de acontecimentos desconcertantes, que amea am destruir o seu casamento e minar a sua confian a na realidadePor que que a sua mulher, Grace, come a a comportar se de uma forma t o desconcertante pouco depois de ele ter come ado a escrever no estranho bloco de notas Por que que o dono da papelaria encerra precipitadamente o estabelecimento no dia seguinte Qual a liga o entre uma lista telef nica polaca, de , e um romance perdido cujo protagonista consegue adivinhar o futuro Quando que a animosidade explode e passa a viol ncia At que ponto que o perd o a derradeira express o do amor D vidas e incertezas de simples seres humanos, a bra os com as m ltiplas e nebulosas esferas da vida quotidianaRomance hipn tico, reflex o sobre a natureza do tempo, e uma viagem pelo labirinto da imagina o de um homem A Noite do Or culo um tour de force narrativo que confirma a reputa o do autor como um dos mais arrojados e originais da Am rica dos nossos dias.


About the Author: Paul Auster

Paul Auster is the bestselling author of Report from the Interior, Winter Journal, Sunset Park, Invisible, The Book of Illusions, and The New York Trilogy, among many other works He has been awarded the Prince of Asturias Prize for Literature, the Prix M dicis tranger, the Independent Spirit A Noite eBook Ð Award, and the Premio Napoli He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a Commandeur de l Ordre des Arts et des Lettres He lives in Brooklyn, New York.



10 thoughts on “A Noite do Oráculo

  1. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Oracle Night, Paul AusterThe novel is about a writer named Sidney Orr Orlovsky , who, after making a miraculous recovery from near fatal illness, buys a new notebook and starts writing a story about a man who completely changed his life when he realized how much his existence was ruled by randomness 2003 1384 271 23 9643691632 138 Oracle Night, Paul AusterThe novel is about a writer named Sidney Orr Orlovsky , who, after making a miraculous recovery from near fatal illness, buys a new notebook and starts writing a story about a man who completely changed his life when he realized how much his existence was ruled by randomness 2003 1384 271 23 9643691632 1386 1392 21


  2. Annet Annet says:

    I had been sick for a long time When the day came for me to leave the hospital, I barely knew how to walk any, could barely remember who I was supposed to be.One of the best Austers I ve read, seriously Auster, you love him or you hate him I ve struggled with his books, but always ended up fascinated Auster writes brooding stories, there s always something below the surface and to find out what s going on is a challenge.This is a brooding story too, it was a smooth read for me, enj I had been sick for a long time When the day came for me to leave the hospital, I barely knew how to walk any, could barely remember who I was supposed to be.One of the best Austers I ve read, seriously Auster, you love him or you hate him I ve struggled with his books, but always ended up fascinated Auster writes brooding stories, there s always something below the surface and to find out what s going on is a challenge.This is a brooding story too, it was a smooth read for me, enjoyed every moment of it Brooding, fascinating, intriguing, loving sad Fantastic story, really Auster uses storylines within the main story, by way of footer notes in small print Yes, it worked for me And again, I love Auster s usual setting, New York, Brooklyn The main character in the book Sidney Orr, walks the streets of New York, recovering from a serious illness I can see, smell and feel New York one of my favorite cities in the world Auster always knows how to describe it just in the right way Loved it 4.5 stars, maybe five It s a story that lingers in the back of your head.Recommended The story in shortSeveral months into his recovery from a near fatal illness 34 old novelist Sidney Orr enters a stationery shop in Brooklyn and buys a blue notebook For the next 9 days Orr will live under the spell of this blue book, trapped inside a world of eerie premonitions and bewildering events that threaten to destroy his marriage and undermine his faith in reality


  3. Fabian Fabian says:

    The story within the story device gives Paul Auster plenty of freedom to orchestrate this postmodern novel These are the fake jottings of an active writer and they include daily occurrences diarylike , ideas for plots, a coherent free flow of thoughts and musings, a scrapbook of so much mixed media which describes a vivid world dabbling in the surreal His avoiding the usage of quotation marks in the story within the story s dialogue conveys the continuity of the writer s imagination He use The story within the story device gives Paul Auster plenty of freedom to orchestrate this postmodern novel These are the fake jottings of an active writer and they include daily occurrences diarylike , ideas for plots, a coherent free flow of thoughts and musings, a scrapbook of so much mixed media which describes a vivid world dabbling in the surreal His avoiding the usage of quotation marks in the story within the story s dialogue conveys the continuity of the writer s imagination He uses literary irony, sometimes his character s descriptions are so remarkably like those he makes of his acquaintances Plot wise there is jumping around, making whole days lapse only one paragraph, creating different story lines and times, using repetition to give the reader a vague sense of d j vu Chapterless, it continues in the grand tradition of the thriller continued and realized to its most masterful level in 2006 with Scott Smith s novel of visceral horror The Ruins to be easy to follow, despite having no rests between climaxes plot revelations The narcissistic novel brand is befitting of Oracle Night Let s not forget Auster s trademark use of footnotes More than creating an academic i.e entitled voice, this tool can pump ininformation to an otherwise short novel Footnotes are small pockets of compressed data additionally they allow the reader to interact with the text itself He flips the pages prematurely to get the hidden back story, breaking the rules of literature by traversing through the main plot itselfThis is a book about books through through


  4. Elyse Walters Elyse Walters says:

    Audiobook read by Paul AusterThis was my 3rd time listening to Auster read one of his books His voice is distinct, engaging, natural, terrific rhythmic flow complementing his storytelling prose I m late to seriously becoming a fan but, I m definitely getting there Auster really holds my attention so much so I promised myself that the next Auster book I choose I ll read it rather than listen to him I have a hard time separating the entertainment value between his voice or the s Audiobook read by Paul AusterThis was my 3rd time listening to Auster read one of his books His voice is distinct, engaging, natural, terrific rhythmic flow complementing his storytelling prose I m late to seriously becoming a fan but, I m definitely getting there Auster really holds my attention so much so I promised myself that the next Auster book I choose I ll read it rather than listen to him I have a hard time separating the entertainment value between his voice or the story itself I like both We meet Sidney Orr a novelist and the narrator Sidney was recovering from a serious illness After leaving the hospital he walks into The Paper Palace , a stationary store and bought a blue notebook that was made in Portugal He becomes obsessed it and he begins to write again after a period of writers block Interesting odd things start to happen as Sid begins to write.This is a complex story about a book of stories, three to be specific , within storiesconnecting them to all to Sidney and all the things important in his own life The mystery, intrigue, and descriptions kept me glued.This is a novel but it times it felt like it was non fiction Set in 1982, we follow Sydney s life for nine days His marriage is threatened coincidences happened characters are compelling especially Grace, his wife and we take an introspective look into the future For me the greatness was the intimacy of Sidney telling the stories leaving hints of the concerns of his own life That old saying, I could listen to this guy read the phone book , applies accurately for me with Paul Auster


  5. Shovelmonkey1 Shovelmonkey1 says:

    Every time I start a Paul Auster book I get twenty pages into it and think, That s it He s finally over stepped the mark He s jumped from the edge of the clever cliff and into the precipice of w nky too smart and arty for his own good literature And then, I am always proved wrong Sorry Paul I judge you too harshly Another excellent book with the trademark Austerisms Convoluted, random, perhaps even a little too common place at times, writhing like a bag of snakes the twists and turns had Every time I start a Paul Auster book I get twenty pages into it and think, That s it He s finally over stepped the mark He s jumped from the edge of the clever cliff and into the precipice of w nky too smart and arty for his own good literature And then, I am always proved wrong Sorry Paul I judge you too harshly Another excellent book with the trademark Austerisms Convoluted, random, perhaps even a little too common place at times, writhing like a bag of snakes the twists and turns had me on the ceiling and facing the wrong way before I knew it This either means they were very good or that I am easily confused, I ll leave it to you to decide which Although as a footnote something that you seem to be all too fond of in this book , I just thought it was worth pointing out that as a personal preference it really winds me up when the footnotes are actually larger than the main text Anyone else feel this way Also if the footnote stretches forthan three pages and is running as a sort of contemporaneous commentary then it s probably worth just scrapping the footnotes and putting all the information into the main text non See, like here I could have just put this bit of the review up there with the main part of the review but now you re down here reading this part of the review and by the time you glance back up to the main thread you ll have forgotten what I was talking about up there and be thinking about the footnote which is really just the story continued in another way Hmmm So is it annoying or is it just me


  6. Jeremy Jeremy says:

    Oracle Night seems like one of Auster sperfunctory novels There is the usual blend of a narrator getting over some big personal tragedy, reflections on the power of language writing especially in this case , recurring coincidences, a female love interest in trouble, etc The opening conceit of the blank notebook and Sid s need to fill it has this really interesting, ominous vibe going to it But Auster doesn t seem all that committed to really diving into it, and by the end of the book i Oracle Night seems like one of Auster sperfunctory novels There is the usual blend of a narrator getting over some big personal tragedy, reflections on the power of language writing especially in this case , recurring coincidences, a female love interest in trouble, etc The opening conceit of the blank notebook and Sid s need to fill it has this really interesting, ominous vibe going to it But Auster doesn t seem all that committed to really diving into it, and by the end of the book it felt like littlethan a forgotten pretext to set the whole narrative up instead of an organic development within the story There are some really nice passages though, and it s interesting to read one of his books that has a decidedlydomestic kind of feel to it than a lot of his other work But the ending feels rushed, and the whole strung out son of a family friend who suddenly pops up to wreak havoc in everyone s lives feels kind of like a cheap deus ex machina I d expect that kind of weak stuff from someone s first novel, not their umpteenth


  7. Salva Salva says:

    Shall I change the stars I ve given this book about 10 years ago because I enjoyed it eventhis time Is it the story or me that has changed The changes I ve been through these past 10 years must be enormous as I totally connected with the book in a totally different way this time I love the way Auster puts things, and I even lovehow the things unfold gradually through the story No doubt he is one of the greatest authors I have read I will try reading this magical novel when I m Shall I change the stars I ve given this book about 10 years ago because I enjoyed it eventhis time Is it the story or me that has changed The changes I ve been through these past 10 years must be enormous as I totally connected with the book in a totally different way this time I love the way Auster puts things, and I even lovehow the things unfold gradually through the story No doubt he is one of the greatest authors I have read I will try reading this magical novel when I m turning 40 to see how it goes then


  8. Mandi Mandi says:

    Through the entire story I had the feeling I was on the verge of stumbling on the meat of it, but it never happened I stuck with it hoping for even a line that would satisfy the on the verge feeling, but by the last line on the last page, I realized it wasn t coming Maybe I m too dense to really get the underlying substance of this book, but believe me, I was looking for it.


  9. Andrew Kaufman Andrew Kaufman says:

    It s been a long time since I ve had a new favourite writer Paul Auster is my new favourite writer.


  10. Rebecca Gransden Rebecca Gransden says:

    Auster here takes story telling and uses that as a means to ponder reality and every labyrinthine way this translates through perception He takes the maze and straightens it out so that every turn, every fork, every dead end corridor or way in or out is set parallel Then what is left is something like the strata of rock, each layer signifying different eras in soil but here the unknowable passage we take from our point of view, fractured, subjective and incomplete Auster takes that sample in Auster here takes story telling and uses that as a means to ponder reality and every labyrinthine way this translates through perception He takes the maze and straightens it out so that every turn, every fork, every dead end corridor or way in or out is set parallel Then what is left is something like the strata of rock, each layer signifying different eras in soil but here the unknowable passage we take from our point of view, fractured, subjective and incomplete Auster takes that sample in stone and removes it from its original position, cuts out a slab, showing each layer stark in its particular colour and bleeding into every other, and polishes it until it reflects a clear light Then he lays it down flat so that there is no point of orientation, we can t make out the bottom from the top, but we can glide over its slippery surface taking great care and occasionally glance down at some weird reflection.The way in of the story within a story within a story within a going on for infinity is almost the least relevant aspect when experiencing this novel Sure, it is the point of entry, the conceit, but that is not what is delivered whilst reading this This is not a puzzle waiting to be solved, or a challenge, or somewhere to find solidity I feel I float through the best of what he does and it is difficult to get a handle on what is being reached for In The New York Trilogy Auster writes It was something like the word it in the phrase it is raining or it is night What that it referred to Quinn had never known And that is where I find this novel walking hand in hand with the it For all the urban mysticism, the disambiguation folding back on itself, the necessary clarity of prose, the deft straddling of psychological nuance and the conveyance of time and perception relative to existence, I m none the wiser Perhaps that is precisely it.I have added a blue notebook to my Christmas wishlist


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *