Life in the Slipstream: The Legend of Bobby Walthour Sr.

Life in the Slipstream: The Legend of Bobby Walthour Sr.


Life in the Slipstream: The Legend of Bobby Walthour Sr. ➸ [Reading] ➺ Life in the Slipstream: The Legend of Bobby Walthour Sr. By Andrew M. Homan ➭ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk A century before Lance Armstrong captured headlines around the world by winning a record seventh consecutive Tour de France, another American dominated the world of competitive cycling His name was Bo A century before Lance Armstrong captured the Slipstream: Kindle Ï headlines around the world by winning a record seventh consecutive Tour de France, another American dominated the world of competitive cycling His name was Bobby Walthour, and in the early s he was one of the world s most famous and highly paid athletes Life in the Slipstream chronicles Walthour s rise from a lowly bicycle messenger in Georgia to a two time national and international cycling Life in Kindle - champion who was nearly as popular in Paris and his adopted home of Berlin as he was in his hometown of Atlanta His career parallels the surging popularity of the bicycle in America, and this biography depicts his life against the backdrop of the bicycle craze that swept America in the late s and early s Readers will experience the rough and tumble world of professional cycling at the turn of the twentieth century, in the Slipstream: PDF/EPUB ¿ where deadly accidents and illicit drugs were commonplace During Walthour s long career, than a dozen of his rivals were killed or permanently injured He himself suffered multiple injuries from fractured ribs and separated collarbones to mangled fingers and concussions and was twice declared dead as a result of racing accidents But Walthour s fortunes on the racing circuit ultimately took a dramatic turn for the worse when his personal life began to unravel because of drug abuse and an unhappy marriage that culminated in his attempted murder by his own wife Life in the Slipstream is an unforgettable account of the rise and fall of one of the greatest athletes of the twentieth century.


10 thoughts on “Life in the Slipstream: The Legend of Bobby Walthour Sr.

  1. Will Will says:

    An interesting life boringly written.


  2. Kristopher Swinson Kristopher Swinson says:

    I couldn t resist reading about my 3rd cousin 5 generations removed per his ancestor though for me the biography held littleinterest than had Seabiscuit I wonder on what basis they made the assertion, Bobby had the same blond hair and steely blue eyes as his Austrian German great great grandfather, John Casper Waldhauer, who had arrived in Georgia in 1746 Homan stresses that cycling became overshadowed by baseball as the American pastime, I couldn t resist reading about my 3rd cousin 5 generations removed per his ancestor though for me the biography held littleinterest than had Seabiscuit I wonder on what basis they made the assertion, Bobby had the same blond hair and steely blue eyes as his Austrian German great great grandfather, John Casper Waldhauer, who had arrived in Georgia in 1746 Homan stresses that cycling became overshadowed by baseball as the American pastime, resulting in Walthour s consignment to obscurity whereas he raked indough than Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth at times He won acclaim of great proportions in Europe, with the French christening him L Imbattable Walthour, and at one point a mob paused to chant, C est Walthour, Walthour, qu il nous fait He noted with some satisfaction that the rarely effusive Germans gave him an ovation like no other, possibly taking so well to him because his blond frame resembled their own Incredibly dangerous, the sport took nerves of steel, and he survived an incredible number of injuries in fact, he won one race in Europe after hopping back onto a new bicycle after two wipeouts at over 50 miles an hour This book is filled with instances of individuals being run down or colliding with things fatally.I enjoyed some of the character details, studiously assembled long after the fact It s disappointing that he compromised somewhat on his refusal to race on Sundays, though he remained a teetotaler who refused to smoke When he arrived in Paris, he had no interest in seeing the sites, but asked to be directed to the nearest track so he could begin practicing Upon his return, he told fellow Georgians that he preferred his native soil and buildings One night after the children had been put to bed, Walthour answered a knock at his front door on Woodward Avenue Two strange men with trench coats and hats pulled down low over their eyes stood on the porch They offered him 500 13,000 if he would intentionally lose a three heat race Walthour refused They quickly upped the ante to 1,000 26,000 No thank you They doubled the offer again Walthour calmly but firmly told his visitors that 10,000 was not enough In desperation they offered 500 for Walthour to lose just one heat Walthour lost his patience and ordered the men off his property


  3. Michael Michael says:

    I thought this was a very well executed and readable biography of Bobby Walthour Sr., who was an amazingly successful bicycle racer in the early 1900s Considering that the research seems to have come almost entirely from newspaper and magazine articles, the level of detail is remarkable The focus is on his racing but there is a fair amount about his life otherwisethan one might expect from someone who kept no diary and didn t have correspondence to mine Walthour did two kinds of racin I thought this was a very well executed and readable biography of Bobby Walthour Sr., who was an amazingly successful bicycle racer in the early 1900s Considering that the research seems to have come almost entirely from newspaper and magazine articles, the level of detail is remarkable The focus is on his racing but there is a fair amount about his life otherwisethan one might expect from someone who kept no diary and didn t have correspondence to mine Walthour did two kinds of racing for the most part, both extremely well He participated in six day races that were two member team events the riders didn t ride 24 hours a day on an annual basis at Madison Square Garden and then he did paced racing behind motorcycles the paced cycle races were incredible dangerous, performed on banked tracks with little enough space for both the riders on the bikes and the motorcycles they were closely following From 1900 to 1910 something like ten of the best riders from around the world or the drivers of the pace motorcycles died in accidents despite being one of the busiest and most successful riders, Walthour survived Walthour earned for the time a phenomenal amount of money racing The actor translates the dollar figures into present day amounts but it isuseful that he provides the context of what earnings were for different professions and various typical costs The sustained speeds achieved by cyclists Being motor paced could be quite incrediblethan fifty miles per hour forthan an hour The description of the events conveys the drama well I gave this rice stars but I m a cycling enthusiast I m not sure how this would appeal to someone who was not so taken with cycling


  4. David Southerland David Southerland says:

    Definitely worth reading if you are into cycling But after a while the book becomes a death march of descriptions of every race Walthour ever entered.and they all read the same unless there is a crash Would have liked to have knownabout the context in sport, history, race relations, and world events and how Walthour fit in Still, nice to have a book about a time when cycling heroes were the best paid and most famous athletes in the world.


  5. M M says:

    A nicely done book that gives the flavor of the era and the man.


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