Koba el Temible PDF ¼ Koba el PDF/EPUB or

Koba el Temible PDF ¼ Koba el PDF/EPUB or


10 thoughts on “Koba el Temible

  1. Maciek Maciek says:

    There has never been a regime quite like it, not anywhere in the history of the universe To have its subjects simultaneously quaking with terror, with hypothermia, with hunger and with laughter.The first jokes about communism in Russia have surfaced almost immediately after the Revolution of 1917 In one, an old woman visits the Zoo in Moscow and upon seeing a camel for the first time laments look what the Bolsheviks did to that horse The usual characteristics of such jokes was their dead There has never been a regime quite like it, not anywhere in the history of the universe To have its subjects simultaneously quaking with terror, with hypothermia, with hunger and with laughter.The first jokes about communism in Russia have surfaced almost immediately after the Revolution of 1917 In one, an old woman visits the Zoo in Moscow and upon seeing a camel for the first time laments look what the Bolsheviks did to that horse The usual characteristics of such jokes was their deadpan and absurd humor, which drew from real life absurdities of the system that their tellers had to live in Usually the jokes made fun of various shortages and inefficiencies What is colder than cold water in Moscow during the winter Hot water , and most of the time were pretty grim and ominous two Russians are walking down the street in Moscow, and the first one asks is this it Have we finally achieved full communism The other man replies Oh no Things still have to get much worse.Despite the joke inspiring absurdities the system itself was no joke, and carried out immense terror in the name of social justice with great precision Terror in Russia was carried out against counter revolutionaries from the very beginning, with cruelty matched only by the Spanish Inquisition, and harvested tens of thousands of victims but it was just a prelude to Stalinism, whose victims were counted in tens of millions Stalin s collectivized agriculture led not only to widespread peasant repression but also provoked a catastrophic famine Staling purged Soviet elite and society of any element which might have challenged his rule no party member, army official and regular comrade could feel safe On his order entire nations have been deported from their homelands to distant, remote regions, hundreds of thousands dying en route The main gist behind the book is a simple one where is the outrage Everyone knows what the Holocaust is and who died in it, but who remembers the millions of Ukrainians, Russians and other ethnicities who were systematically starved to death in peacetime We all know what the SS was, but who today remembers the Cheka or the NKVD We know who Heinrich Himmler and Adolf Eichmann were, but can we say the same about Nikolai Yezhov and Felix Dzerzhinsky Martin Amis is not a historian and doesn t pretend to be one most of historical details about the various horrors of Stalinism and characteristics of Stalin himself Amis takes from works of other historians and authors, all duly cited and the book doesn t aim to be a scholarly work Rather, this is a work which specifically aims to shock and not necessarily by displaying many of Stalin s horrifying atrocities in effect, but rather the silence from those most fit to condemn them the Western intellectual In sympathy with communist ideals and strong feeling for social justice, many of them turned a blind eye to the horrors of the system as practiced in Russia they believed the regime s claim that it was building a better future for its citizens, while turning a blind eye to the reality of the fact that it was slaughtering them by the millions Among intellectuals flirting with Soviet Russia were Amis s own father, Kingsley, and his lifelong friend, Christopher Hitchens and the book contains personal letters to both, and as a whole reads as the ultimate attempt at an catharsis.In Russia, popular opinion about Stalin remains mixed A 2007 pool revealed that over a half of surveyed Russian considered Stalin to be a wise leader in an earlier poll over one third of the respondents would vote for Stalin were he alive today Stalin s image as a strong leader continues to be cultivated, with many of his supporters seeing in him a person who would bring the end to corruption inside the country and greatly elevate its role on the world stage These are mostly people who were born and grew up decades after Stalin was long dead but not only among the nation his crimes are only dimly remembered, like a fever dream which it has half forgotten upon waking up to its normal life It s almost biblical, as it seems that in the end all sins truly will be forgiven even Stalin s.For those interested in a broader but still very accessible history of revolutionary Russia, I d recommend Orlando Figes s book of the same title, Revolutionary Russia, 1891 1991 A History my review linked


  2. Manny Manny says:

    Amis on Stalin Not a scholarly work, as many people have pointed out, and is it still necessary to debunk Stalin But I thought it was a successful book You think you know how bad Stalin was, but, in fact, most people don t At least, I didn t, and I ve read Solzhenitsyn My favorite part was the section on Stalin s incredible popularity It s painful to write this , says Amis He describes the belief, widely held by ordinary citizens, that Stalin was quite unaware of all the terrible thing Amis on Stalin Not a scholarly work, as many people have pointed out, and is it still necessary to debunk Stalin But I thought it was a successful book You think you know how bad Stalin was, but, in fact, most people don t At least, I didn t, and I ve read Solzhenitsyn My favorite part was the section on Stalin s incredible popularity It s painful to write this , says Amis He describes the belief, widely held by ordinary citizens, that Stalin was quite unaware of all the terrible things that were being done by his subordinates He was living in the bubble, to use the modern idiom People would wistfully say that, if only he knew, he d surely take steps to fix it.Stalin being popular with the Russians it defies the imagination, but apparently it was true You can see that Orwell was just reporting what he saw


  3. Szplug Szplug says:

    Amis is a fine writer, and the personal touches he brings to his recounting of the crimes committed by Stalin ismor less the musings about a family raised under the strong left leanings of his father, Kingsley, and the troubling political and ideological shoring up they were forced to undertake as the murderousness of the Soviet regime began to crystalize with a definition that only the most fervent fellow traveler could wish away provide a principal ingredient of what makes this book wor Amis is a fine writer, and the personal touches he brings to his recounting of the crimes committed by Stalin ismor less the musings about a family raised under the strong left leanings of his father, Kingsley, and the troubling political and ideological shoring up they were forced to undertake as the murderousness of the Soviet regime began to crystalize with a definition that only the most fervent fellow traveler could wish away provide a principal ingredient of what makes this book worthwhile As other reviews have pointed out, much that comprises Amis revelations within about the brutal communist despotism conducted by the Georgian Maestro has been pinched from the historic writings of other authors, with a particular emphasis upon those of Alexander Solzhenitsyn It might further be noted that Amis anti Stalinist and hence Soviet salvo, with its pronouncing upon the furious violence that so often attends revolution, that the latter gravitates towards devouring its progenitors, of the impositions, illusions, and sheer inhumanity inherent to any state instituted cult of personality, was launched from the comfort of a perch occupied when nothing revealed was new, its purported targets not visible anywhere on the immediate horizon And that would not be completely unfair Yet, with all of that said, I felt that Amis outraged tone together with blackly humorous undertone did justice to the material at hand, never allowing the reader particularly the former leftist reader to forget the appalling brutality that was visited upon millions of citizens during a period that combined technological and bureaucratic prowess with an ideological insanity


  4. Peter Tillman Peter Tillman says:

    Martin Amis s Koba the Dread is his personal account of Stalin the mass murdering monster, and of the obstinate blindness and stupidity of Western intellectuals who continued to argue that, even if it had problems, Soviet Communism had its heart in the right place, really Which Martin got to view firsthand, as Kingsley Amis s son his dad was an old CPUK comrade, turned virulently anti communist in his old age.Robert Conquest memorably began his history of Stalin s Terror famine abou Martin Amis s Koba the Dread is his personal account of Stalin the mass murdering monster, and of the obstinate blindness and stupidity of Western intellectuals who continued to argue that, even if it had problems, Soviet Communism had its heart in the right place, really Which Martin got to view firsthand, as Kingsley Amis s son his dad was an old CPUK comrade, turned virulently anti communist in his old age.Robert Conquest memorably began his history of Stalin s Terror famine about 20 human lives were lost, not for every word, but for every letter in this book Or around 320,000 dead for every letter in this little quote Stalin s career total was at least 20 million people killed the vast majority Soviet citizens For his revised edition of The Great Terror some years ago, Conquest suggested that his publisher retitle it I Told You So, You Fucking Fools I never quite got the courage to read The Great Terror , and in fact I repeatedly bogged down in Amis s short course on Stalin s monstrous career This sort of thing is almost too awful to contemplate So people make excuses, or just don t believe, or put off thinking about it Well, Me too Amis notes how convenient it was for Stalin that a true description of the Soviet Union exactly resembled a demented slander of the Soviet Union Negative perfection Yet contemplate monsters we must, or we will suffer them again Stalin was hardly an isolated figure The 21st century has monsters, too But best read in small doses..My 2005 review


  5. Michael Michael says:

    First, a note about Goodreads star ratings Some people on Goodreads don t really get the one star review A single star means simply that for whatever reason, you didn t like a book That s all Not that you hated it, not that you loathed it a single star is not a black hole of antipathy but just a note that a book didn t satisfy you in some deeper sense It s not an objective rating of quality, but all about subjective response So when I give a book one star, it s not that I think I m spea First, a note about Goodreads star ratings Some people on Goodreads don t really get the one star review A single star means simply that for whatever reason, you didn t like a book That s all Not that you hated it, not that you loathed it a single star is not a black hole of antipathy but just a note that a book didn t satisfy you in some deeper sense It s not an objective rating of quality, but all about subjective response So when I give a book one star, it s not that I think I m speaking for the entirety of western readership It s just me, saying I didn t care for a book I originally posted a brief rating of this book years ago, and some asshat responded by attacking me and my tastes That review has disappeared don t remember whether I deleted it or whether one of the Goodreads librarians took down the comment threat Regardless, considering that I d pretty much skimmed the second half of the book back in 2004, I thought it worth rereading the book to see if my feelings about it had changed And they haven t.Look, I love Martin Amis I do I think his best books partake of all kinds of genius, among them a first rate analytical mind and a nimble writerly voice capable of linguistic hijinks as well as emotional subtleties But I felt that Koba the Dread was a chore six years ago, and I still feel that way.The gist of the book is this Not enough is made of the nearly incomprehensible horrors of Bolshevism, first in its Leninist incarnation and then in the refined in terms of killing the populace form that was Stalinism We all know of the death camps of the Third Reich, and can even name them with some knowledge of what happened there We ve all seen Schindler s List But there is not an equivalent awareness of the horrors that transpired in Russia after the revolution of 1917 In large part, Amis s book functions as a gloss on the atrocities of the era The scholarship here is impeccable he s ransacked whole shelves of Soviet camp literature and histories to put together this 280 page march of misery It s horrifying stuff I read the first Gulag Archipelago in high school, along with One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch, and that is as nothing to the full roster of ugliness laid out in this book Amis conveys it all in a cool burn, his fury held barely in check but always sensed in the extremities of the writing His stylistic tics, present in all of his novels, are at their worst when he is feeling righteous The self conscious effects sometimes almost draw attention away from the things he is writing about So far, so good There are fatter books that cover the same material his family friend Robert Conquest is one of the main authorities, as well as Solzhenitsyn and too many others to list here Those books opt for a different tone, trusting that the facts and accounts will suffice to get the horror across But maybe Amis s book will reach a wider audience, and maybe that s why he wrote it.But I don t know that I believe that And I guess it is Amis s reasons for writing the book that bothered me the most Who is he writing this for Who is he attacking Because the book feels like a sustained attack on some strawman apologist for the Soviet Union who hasn t existed since the mid eighties Back then, in the eighties, I worked in USC s Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and even then, the depredations of the Soviet Union were pretty well documented The number dead were estimated to be about 15 million back then, but as the Soviet Union fell andrecords were released, the numbers steadily climbed upward And the silences that met these accounts were those of people horrified to a place beyond words Hard to know how to respond, but at any rate, by the turn of the millennium, the horrors were pretty well known And no one was standing as the champion for that old regime that murdered its populace.So who is this book for There is a troubling bit of memoir appended to this book, an open letter to Christopher Hitchens taking him to task for his romantic attachments to the old Soviet Union And perhaps that is who this is for perhaps it is a settling of scores of an ill considered intellectual stance held by Amis s dear friends But I don t know that that is reason enough for this book, and I don t know that it is an appropriate use of the twenty million deadAmis s cataloging of the horrors is infallible it s the reason behind it that made me uncomfortable, then and now.So one star I didn t like it I respect it, but I didn t like it then, and I didn t like it upon rereading it


  6. Erik Graff Erik Graff says:

    It is unfortunate that Vintage lists this as Memoir History as it isn t history in any serious sense Amis is no historian While indexed, the book lacks both bibliography and substantiating footnotes Amis primary sources as cited in the text, lean, as he admits, to the right.The book is, however, partly a personal memoir and mostly an polemical essay or series of essays attacking the Soviet system in general and Stalin in particular On the personal side, it is interesting that Amis is an o It is unfortunate that Vintage lists this as Memoir History as it isn t history in any serious sense Amis is no historian While indexed, the book lacks both bibliography and substantiating footnotes Amis primary sources as cited in the text, lean, as he admits, to the right.The book is, however, partly a personal memoir and mostly an polemical essay or series of essays attacking the Soviet system in general and Stalin in particular On the personal side, it is interesting that Amis is an old friend of Christopher Hitchens Not knowing that until he mentioned it, Amis style reminded me of Hitchens clever and opinionated, if not so learned Now what would be really interesting would be a book of Amis and Hitchens arguing about Communism given that Amis has no real investment while Hitchens has Trotskyist roots.That said, it is a well written essay, a quick read Amis actually does manage to evoke dark chuckles as he recounts the terrors of the Soviet system without making light of the suffering Indeed, he bludgeons the reader with tales of terror and suffering, enough perhaps to make even a diehard apologist take note and pursue a modern history of the subject


  7. Peterb Peterb says:

    It wasa symmetrical convenience for Stalin that a true description of the Soviet Union exactly resembled a demented slander of the Soviet Union Martin Amis opens his very personal history of Josef Stalin, Koba the Dread Laughter and the Twenty Million with a quote from Robert Conquest s book on the the Terror Famine We may perhaps put this in perspective in the present case by saying that in the actions here recorded about twenty human lives were lost for, not every word, but every It wasa symmetrical convenience for Stalin that a true description of the Soviet Union exactly resembled a demented slander of the Soviet Union Martin Amis opens his very personal history of Josef Stalin, Koba the Dread Laughter and the Twenty Million with a quote from Robert Conquest s book on the the Terror Famine We may perhaps put this in perspective in the present case by saying that in the actions here recorded about twenty human lives were lost for, not every word, but every letter, in this book.That sentence represented 3,040 lives The book is 411 pages long Amis belongs to a particular literary circle that isinbred than the most backward hillbilly clans in Appalachia They self congratulate, they self promote, they review each others books, and they never seem to tire of writing about the 1980s in London One must always approach anything by this clique with caution, as if engaging a drunk at a party, because you never know when they will ambush you with tiresome insider rubbish One moment you ll be engaged in sparkling repartee about Sir Richard Burton s Arabian Nights, and then suddenly you re listening to a pointless ramble about the time James Fenton got really drunk and threw up on the doorstep of The New Statesman, and you have to start looking for excuses to leave the party I completely fabricated this example but if you ve read any of their works you know that it might have been true.I am willing to forgive Amis his lapses into inside baseball Why Because his sentences are beautiful Because he is a compelling prose stylist And because you can recognize his writing from just a few sentences But that is want they want, the believers, the steely ones, that is what they live for the politicization of sleep They want politics to be going on everywhere all the time, politics permanent and circumambient They want the ubiquitization of politics they want the politicization of sleep I approached Koba the Dread with some trepidation also because the reviews of it in the mainstream British literary press were so universally tepid, and surprisingly negative Now, with the benefit of having read the book, one can see the level to which the criticisms are not political, or even literary, but personal Certainly one might forgive this of the late Christopher Hitchens, since after all Amis includes a chapter written to him in the book, and gently but directly indicts him When punched, it s fair game to punch back But this excuse doesn t extend to those such as Johann Hari am I allowed to be publicly amused at his fall from grace who mix valid criticism of the work Amis interpreting Stalin s crimes from a personal perspective come off as somewhat lightweight with purely personal ad hominem of course Amis book isn t any good, because Hari didn t like his father I was in my late twenties when I first realized the moment came as I read a piece about Islam in the TLS that theocracies are meant to work Until then I thought that repression, censorship, terror and destitution were the price you had to pay for living by the Book But no, that wasn t the idea at all Koranic rule was meant to bring you swimming pools and hydrogen bombs Collectivization, similarly, was meant to work Stalin had earlier expressed doubts about the Left deviation i.e., extremely doctrinaire attitude to the peasantry its policies, he said, would inevitably lead to a great increase in the price of agricultural produce, a fall in real salaries and an artificially produced famine And his preparations for Collectivization, in the initial burst, were frivolously lax Yet Stalin believed that Collectivization would work Collectivization would astonish the world This was a Stalinist rush of blood And that is how Stalinism is perhaps best represented as a series of rushes of blood Other criticisms of the work center around the choice of topic Who, today, are the Stalinists who must be denounced and the appropriateness of Amis as the writer Amis relies heavily on the works of Robert Conquest, whose book The Great Terror remains the most encyclopedic treatise on the topic Why not just read Conquest Amis himself is not coy about his credentials he presents himself as a novelist who has read several yards of books about the Soviet experiment He does not pretend to be Robert Conquest, but rather someone writing a book that summarizes and distills the horrors that he s read about and tries to grapple with certain questions Among them, why were so many seemingly otherwise intelligent Westerners seduced into sympathizing with the Soviet experiment in the face of the pile of corpses it produced Why can people so easily joke about Communism, when it is so muchdifficult, comparatively speaking, to joke about Nazism And why, in world where the name Stalin is only somewhat less reviled than the name Hitler, do people still speak admiringly of Lenin and Trotsky a nun killer , opines Amis , who were no less brutal in their aims, albeitlimited in their capabilities Some prominent comrade further remarked that only then, when Communism ruled the earth, would the really warm work of class struggle be ready to begin.And I instantly pictured a scorpion stinging itself to death Scorpions have of course been known to do this when surrounded by fire, for example But where is the fire, on a Communist planet It is a fire in the self It is self hatred and life hatred After all, the scorpion has an excellent objective reason for killing the scorpion it s alive, isn t it The central part of Koba the Dread is concerned with the events leading up to the Great Terror, including the numerous famines and the Party machinations that resulted in Stalin taking power Amis makes the argument that this became inevitable years before, around the time of the Kronstadt rebellion when the Bolsheviks realized that they did not, in fact, have any meaningful support among the workers they claimed to represent Kronstad made it clear, even to Lenin, that World Revolution was not about to happen And so the Bolsheviks decided that if the People weren t going to support the revolution, than the Party itself would have to safeguard it By murdering the People the revolution was on behalf of, if necessary The Party, in other words, became its own raison d tre, and from this point some result similar to the Terror became inevitable Although Stalin did manage to be truly impressive in his brutality To quote Amis, when Stalin wished for a death, then that wish came true This core of the book is shocking to anyone whom, like me, was not acquainted with the breadth and depth of human misery the Great Terror encompassed As Amis observes, all of us would say we feel that the Holocaust was worse than the Terror But if called to account for this based strictly on numbers and the horror of personal stories, I think any of us would be hard pressed to reduce that feeling to a cogent and consistent explanation From that perspective, I think that Koba the Dread is an important book It takes a topic that I would be willing to wager most Westerners simply don t know much about and distills it into an emotional blow that can be absorbed, and that will leave the reader thinking for days.Wrapped around this core are some of Amis personal recollections the death of his sister Sally, some struggle understanding his father s move from a dedicated Communist to that of a dedicated right winger, and all of this wrapped up with not a little guilt about his many happy years running in a social circle that was and, honestly, still is all too happy to make excuse after excuse for the Soviet experiment, despite the piles of corpses While I understand Amis need to provide a framework to hang the core upon, it does, in my opinion, weaken the work somewhat It may have been cathartic for him to create that frame, but next to the edifice of Soviet dead, any such frame will appear trivial at best, and petty at worst Despite my reservations about the framing, I think that Koba the Dread is still an important work, and one whose importance will only become apparent some years from now after the cocktail party clique grows old and is forgotten, and what remains is an exploration into the depths of pain and degradation into which ideology can drag us


  8. Muhammad Ahmad Muhammad Ahmad says:

    This is a book about Stalin s reign of terror that, unlike Orwell, is unsparing towards Lenin and Trotsky as well The author wonders why people are revolted by Nazism, but Stalinism gets such an easy pass Indeed, it is common in the west for Soviet nostalgia among intellectuals to not be considered an evil on par with Nazi sympathies Many young people equally ignorant of Soviet history see communism as an edgy, aesthetic affectation This book would be useful in disabusing them of such romant This is a book about Stalin s reign of terror that, unlike Orwell, is unsparing towards Lenin and Trotsky as well The author wonders why people are revolted by Nazism, but Stalinism gets such an easy pass Indeed, it is common in the west for Soviet nostalgia among intellectuals to not be considered an evil on par with Nazi sympathies Many young people equally ignorant of Soviet history see communism as an edgy, aesthetic affectation This book would be useful in disabusing them of such romanticising It would be, if it weren t for the author The book is useful as a compendium of extant writings on soviet history Many good quotations But every time the author s voice intrudes, you feel clutched by the clammy hands of pretension and inauthenticity If you remove the author s turgid interventions, it may even be a good book But there is too much of the author in here, and the author, alas, is insufferable


  9. Jonathan Maas Jonathan Maas says:

    A Semi biography of Stalin, concentrating less on the historical details, andon a meta analysis of the events themselves.This was my first foray into the world of Martin Amis, and it was intense.I read about him in the New Yorker recently, and quickly forgave myself for not having read him before To quote Stephen King and many others so many books so little time If you find you ve been oblivious to a great writer, forgive yourself, go to the library, get his or her work and then move A Semi biography of Stalin, concentrating less on the historical details, andon a meta analysis of the events themselves.This was my first foray into the world of Martin Amis, and it was intense.I read about him in the New Yorker recently, and quickly forgave myself for not having read him before To quote Stephen King and many others so many books so little time If you find you ve been oblivious to a great writer, forgive yourself, go to the library, get his or her work and then move forward.With this review I ll just pass on some insights There were subtle differences between Nazism and Stalinism the softer difference was the humorIn the German case, laughter automatically absents itself Pace Adorno, it was not poetry that became impossible after Auschwitz What became impossible was laughter In the Soviet case, on the other hand, laughter intransigently refuses to absent itself.In short, you hear Communist jokes, even from Gorbachev himself You don t hear Nazi jokes.But all is not great in the world of Bolshevikism Stalinism, unlike Nazism, could be exportedBolshevism was exportable, and produced near identical results elsewhere Nazism could not be duplicated Compared to it, the other fascist states were simply amateurish.Nazism was a one off thing of course it could rise again, and we must be wary, but it was a singular cult of personality that could be cast off, and it is a difficult formula to emulate.Stalinism could be copied as we can see in other countries, one even in the present day Hopefully that will end soon.Stalin also hadat his fingertips than HitlerBut Stalin, in the execution of the broad brushstrokes of his hate, had weapons that Hitler did not have He had cold the burning cold of the Arctic At Oimyakon in the Kolyma a temperature has been recorded of 97.8 F In far lesser cold, steel splits, tyres explode and larch trees shower sparks at the touch of an axe As the thermometer drops, your breath freezes into crystals, and tinkles to the ground with a noise they call the whispering of the stars ii He had darkness the Bolshevik sequestration, the shockingly bitter and unappeasable self exclusion from the planet, with its fear of comparison, its fear of ridicule, its fear of truth.jj He had space the great imperium with its eleven time zones, the distances that gave their blessing to exile and isolation, steppe, desert, taiga, tundra And, most crucially, Stalin had time Terrifying indeed.In any case other insights If there was one small smidgen of justice here, it s that Stalin s end was hastened by the lack of doctorsHe had killed, imprisoned or exiled all the doctors at this point, and when he finally reached his end his own doctors The doctors applied leeches four behind either ear, contentedly and innocently sucking the bedbug s blood Magnesium sulfate was administered by enema and hypodermic.His doctors applied leeches.Of course, Stalin s end was not the end of his tormentAt his funeral many Russians died On the day of Stalin s funeral vast multitudes, ecstatic with false grief and false love, flowed through Moscow in dangerous densities When, in a tightening crowd, your movements are no longer your own and you have to fight to breathe, a simple and sorrowful realization asserts itself through your panic that if death comes, it will be brought here by life, too much life, a superabundance of life And what were they all doing there anyway mourning him On that day well over a hundred people died of asphyxiation in the streets of Moscow So Stalin, embalmed in his coffin, went on doing what he was really good at crushing Russians.What was the cause of Stalin This remains to be knownAmis theorizes it might be his first wife s passing As far as his childhood goes Accounts of the childhoods of the great historical monsters are always bathetic Instead of saying something like X was raised by crocodiles in a septic tank in Kuala Lumpur, they tell you about a mother, a father, a brother, a sister, a house, a home.Stalin had an abusive childhood, but not exceptionally abusive There was no smoking gun, perhaps just a series of steps, augmented by chance, history, biological psychopathy combined with an efficient work ethic The perfect storm.If there is one hero in this it is Aleksandr SolzhenitsynThis is the one saving grace Of course, we re grateful for Amis, as well as his hyper rational friend Christopher Hitchens as long as the world has Amis and Hitchens types, we have a measure of rational safety.But it s Solzhenitsyn, with his courageous documentation of the horrors of Stalinism that made Amis s works possible That might be the one saving grace here no matter the monster, there will always be courageous humans that find a way to document everything, and tell us that the monster was wrong.Regardless great book by Martin Amis I hope to read some of his fiction soon


  10. Katie.dorny Katie.dorny says:

    Part memoir and part mind boggling account of the career and life of Stalin and his contemporaries Amis rightly has a reputation for incredibly convoluted language, so have a dictionary to hand Otherwise it s a brilliant analysis and research on the Great Terror.


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Koba el Temible ➽ [Reading] ➿ Koba el Temible By Martin Amis ➲ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Koba el Temible un libro de memorias, una cr nica, una meditaci n sobre Stalin y su legado es una continuaci n de Experiencia, la aplaudida autobiograf a de Martin Amis Es b sicamente un libro pol tic Koba el Temible un libro de memorias, una cr nica, una meditaci n sobre Stalin y su legado es una continuaci n de Experiencia, la aplaudida autobiograf a de Martin Amis Es b sicamente un libro pol tico Koba el PDF/EPUB or sin dejar de ser personal Se centra en un importante punto d bil del pensamiento del siglo XX la tolerancia de los intelectuales occidentales ante el estalinismo Entre el personal comienzo y el final personal, Amis nos ofrece el mejor cursillo que se ha escrito sobre Stalin Koba el Temible, I sif el Terrible El padre del autor, Kingsley Amis, aunque rectific en la madurez, fue un lacayo de la Komintern como l mismo acabar a diciendo entreySu segundo amigo m s ntimo y luego su amigo m s ntimo despu s de la muerte del poeta Philip Larkin era Robert Conquest, el destacado soviet logo, cuyo libro sobre El gran terrorcontribuy m s que ning n otro, con la nica excepci n de El archipi lago Gulag de Solzhenitsyn, a socavar los cimientos de la URSS Este notable libro de memorias de Martin Amis analiza estas conexiones Stalin dijo que la muerte era un hecho tr gico, pero que la muerte de un mill n era simple estad stica Koba el Temible gira alrededor de una muerte concreta y es una refutaci n del aforismo de Stalin.

    Koba el Temible PDF ¼ Koba el PDF/EPUB or segundo amigo m s ntimo y luego su amigo m s ntimo despu s de la muerte del poeta Philip Larkin era Robert Conquest, el destacado soviet logo, cuyo libro sobre El gran terrorcontribuy m s que ning n otro, con la nica excepci n de El archipi lago Gulag de Solzhenitsyn, a socavar los cimientos de la URSS Este notable libro de memorias de Martin Amis analiza estas conexiones Stalin dijo que la muerte era un hecho tr gico, pero que la muerte de un mill n era simple estad stica Koba el Temible gira alrededor de una muerte concreta y es una refutaci n del aforismo de Stalin."/>
  • Paperback
  • 328 pages
  • Koba el Temible
  • Martin Amis
  • Spanish
  • 09 February 2017
  • 8433970372

About the Author: Martin Amis

Martin Amis is an English novelist, essayist, and short story writer His works include the novels Money, London Fields and The Information The Guardian writes that all his critics have noted what Kingsley Amis his father complained of Koba el PDF/EPUB or as a terrible compulsive vividness in his style that constant demonstrating of his command of English and it s true that the Amis ness of Amis will be recognisable in any piece before he reaches his first full stop Amis s raw material is what he sees as the absurdity of the postmodern condition with its grotesque caricatures He has thus sometimes been portrayed as the undisputed master of what the New York Times has called the new unpleasantness.