Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern

Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern


Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern Warrior Should Think [Reading] ➿ Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern Warrior Should Think By Forrest E. Morgan – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk A step by step approach to applying the Japanese warrior s mind set to martial training and daily life A step by step Martial Way: PDF Í approach to applying the Japanese warrior s mind set to martial training and daily life.

  • Paperback
  • 312 pages
  • Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern Warrior Should Think
  • Forrest E. Morgan
  • English
  • 11 January 2017
  • 0942637763

About the Author: Forrest E. Morgan

Is a well known Martial Way: PDF Í author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern Warrior Should Think book, this is one of the most wanted Forrest E Morgan author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “Living the Martial Way: A Manual for the Way of Modern Warrior Should Think

  1. Jake Jake says:

    This is my second time reading this book The first time was probably about ten years ago, and back then, I thought it was awesome This time around, I have considerablymixed feelings.Living the Martial Way is is a concise manual for training in warrior ship The goal, according to the author, is to provide an outline whereby someone seeking to follow the true warrior s path can learn how to do that Morgan breaks his book into three sections the first, The Way of Training, discusses th This is my second time reading this book The first time was probably about ten years ago, and back then, I thought it was awesome This time around, I have considerablymixed feelings.Living the Martial Way is is a concise manual for training in warrior ship The goal, according to the author, is to provide an outline whereby someone seeking to follow the true warrior s path can learn how to do that Morgan breaks his book into three sections the first, The Way of Training, discusses the actual physical training, from how to choose a style and school, to how to adjust your training to meet your goals The second chapter, the Way of Honor, gets into a variety of philosophical discussion about codes of behavior The last section, the Way of Living, is a sort of catch all section that includes fitness, the relationship between martial arts training and religion, and the subject of mastery in the martial arts.So what s good about this book Honestly, a lot of things The first section is probably the most valuable Morgan provides a solid outline for a practitioner to decide what kind of martial art they should be studying, or how to adjust their practice if they are already training Morgan s ideas about strategy and tactics are extremely useful, and anyone who wants to be even vaguely successful in the martial arts would do well to understand them Some of the mystical ideas I found a bit hard to swallow, though Morgan apparently has become a greater skeptic as he s gotten older.The section on honor isinteresting How valuable it is will probably depend on how much the reader has thought about these sorts of issues previously, and how much they sync up with Morgan s attitudes More on that in a minute.The final section, as I said, is a bit of a hodgepodge I actually didn t re read the Fitness section, since Morgan himself admits that the information contained therein is hopelessly out of date The religion and mysticism section didn t have much for me, but it might be a good starting point for a new martial arts student If nothing else, Morgan warns prospective martial artists about the dangers of martial cults, something that should be repeated loud and often.So, there s a lot of really useful, interesting ideas here What s the issue The issue, for me, is Morgan s voice, tone, and the way he chooses to phrase, well, everything I am, at this point in my life, skeptical of the idea that practicing a martial art is in any way concurrent with being a warrior I am certainly skeptical of the idea that warriors are the sort of magical elite that Morgan holds them up as being Understand that I have the utmost admiration for those people who actually willingly suit up to go into combat in service of their country, and I even understand the idea that one can be a warrior in a philosophical sense without being an actual serviceman or woman I am, however, quite skeptical of the idea that spending your time outside of your office job devoted to the study of a combative system that hasn t been relevant to modern warfare for half a century somehow makes you into a warrior.Morgan s information is good, but it s buried under a constant self aggrandizing tone that manages to come across not as the humble warrior he exhorts his reader to be, but as a pompous ass who thinks he largely superior to everyone around him While that tone is not constant, it pops upfrequently than I like, and enough that I found it setting my teeth on edgethan a few times.Do I still believe this book is worth reading If you re a practicing martial artist, probably While the writing sets my teeth on edge at times, it does contain some ideas that are certainly worth considering The entire first section alone makes the book worthwhile The rest of it, I would approach with a bit of skepticism If you are not a practicing martial artist, but are considering it, I m not sure this is the place I d want you to start While there are ideas I d want you to consider here about goals and directions, I think that there are better,reasonably written books out there that might serve you better Rory Miller s Meditations on Violence will give you a better reference point, without all of the you must become a samurai warrior 1 stuff.If you aren t a practicing martial artist, and aren t considering, I have no idea why you would even be considering this book

  2. Koshin Koshin says:

    This book is like bitter coffee At first you may not like the taste but it definitely wakes you up This book is about living as a warrior in modern times The book explains how to think and act like a warrior in modern times Some of the reviews I have read point to the authors views as elitist by proclaiming that warriors are a step above everyone else or that most martial artists are mere hobbyists playing combat sports instead of training like warriors Some have taken exception to the auth This book is like bitter coffee At first you may not like the taste but it definitely wakes you up This book is about living as a warrior in modern times The book explains how to think and act like a warrior in modern times Some of the reviews I have read point to the authors views as elitist by proclaiming that warriors are a step above everyone else or that most martial artists are mere hobbyists playing combat sports instead of training like warriors Some have taken exception to the authors portrayal of eastern religions such as Buddhism, Shinto and Taoism The book was written in the early 90s and the information on diet and nutrition as it relates to exercise may be a little dated given the advances that have been made in recent years I think that some of the visceral reaction may be due to some peoples defensiveness over the authors main points Many martial artists don t take the warrior approach to their practice Reading this book made me realize the deficiencies in my own practice and made me take a renewed interest in my training After reading this book, I tried to use some of what I read in class and found an immediate improvement He explains every facet of Warriorship How to think, live and act like a warrior He has a great chapter that explains the often used but little understood concept of Honor as it applies to Warriorship Not everything will apply to you but there is a lot you can take from this book whether you study martial arts or not that you can incorporate into your daily life

  3. Lance Schonberg Lance Schonberg says:

    On the face of things, this seems like it should be a good read, and right up my alley, considering theintellectual aspects of the martial arts and the consideration of life and the art as a whole.The author divides things into three sections The Way of Training, The Way of Honor, and The Way of Living.For the first section, The Way of Training, the author seems to favour a harsh, difficult training regimen occupying every waking moment that isn t spent in your day job Looking beyond thi On the face of things, this seems like it should be a good read, and right up my alley, considering theintellectual aspects of the martial arts and the consideration of life and the art as a whole.The author divides things into three sections The Way of Training, The Way of Honor, and The Way of Living.For the first section, The Way of Training, the author seems to favour a harsh, difficult training regimen occupying every waking moment that isn t spent in your day job Looking beyond this, we see the author talking about concepts, and if he uses harsher training examples and anecdotes to illustrate those concepts, this is how he s trained.But where I really start to run into problems with the book is chapter 5, The Warrior s Spell Book At first blush, it looks like I m supposed to believe that the author has mystical powers This is one of the things prevalent in popularized martial arts that irritates me Sensei Bob s ki is so strong, he forced the storm in another direction so it wouldn t disturb our outdoor training It s also here that Mr Morgan spends pages talking about living spirits and life force so much that you think you might be part of a group training montage in a Star Wars movie I got through this section by substituting mind for spirit in almost every instance, but it was difficult But by start to run into problems , Imean I recognize that I ve been having problems all the way along so far It s around this time that I come to the decision that the author s writing doesn t present him as the ever humble warrior he professes himself to be throughout the text He comes across as an arrogant jerk,or less saying that his way is the only way in modern society to be a warrior.He s occasionally even secretive For each concept or principle he s discussed, another lies in shadow, one which I won t tell you about Secrecy is apparently a time honoured tradition in martial arts, and what was good enough for the ancient masters of centuries ago should be good enough for you I d respectfully disagree In current society, that type of attitude is not going to win you friends, much less students and that s what he seems to want us to be reading the book, his students It s one thing to help your students along on the path to figuring things out themselves It s another entirely to tell them you aren t going to tell them something really important, so go figure it out yourself and don t ask me about it.He s also dismissive of almost anything that isn t the classic style of harsh and difficult training he s used to, showing frequent disdain for anything modern, as well as anything that isn t directly connected to his particular favoured style s As a primarily Goju practitioner, one example that stands out for me is a dismissal of the Tensho and Sanchin kata as merely breathing exercises For me, this throwaway statement casts a lot of the rest of Morgan s wisdom into doubt If he can t be bothered to at least attempt to understand something before dismissing or denigrating it, how can his reader be expected to take his words as anythingthan an uninformed opinion In The Way of Honour, on the surface of things the author takes a very medieval Japanese perspective on honour, but the middle chapter gives a lie to that, or at least seems to Honor in Action takes the author s preferred virtues truthfulness, courtesy, restraint, loyalty, and service and draws them out into what he sees as the components of honour in modern western society While one could argue that there are other virtues to be added, Morgan makes a good case for these five The next chapter, on revenge and suicide, makes for interesting reading.The last section, The Way of Living, is a bit of a catch all for things the author didn t want to shoehorn into the first two Fitness, Religion and Mysticism, Dignity, and Mastery Each of these, the reader will need to decide how to take on their own One particular note is that the Fitness chapter is of dubious value when it comes to specifics, written a couple of decades in the past The chapter labelled Religion and Mysticism is a toe in the water kind of introduction to major eastern philosophies Dignity is probably an over simplification of the concepts presented in the chapter, but it s a good summaryAnd the final chapter, on the meaning of Mastery, is probably my favourite in the book In a no nonsense tone, with a personal experience or two, Morgan attempts to show us how mastery has often gotten tangled up with ego and self importance in our society This is an important lesson, and probably a good thing for anyone to learn regarding any art, activity, or skill.Overall rating 2 Stars There is a lot of good stuff in the book, but the author s methodology and personality on paper, at least, and especially in the first section make it hard for me to call it recommended reading Some of what s here is very good, and some of it is very relevant, but for anyone thinking of reading this, I d probably suggest saving it for a time in your personal training when you ve built your own path as a martial artist and have something to measure the author s words against The back half of the book reads far better for a wider martial audience than the front, though it s still hit and miss depending on the subject area being covered

  4. Miroku Nemeth Miroku Nemeth says:

    The Asian martial arts are grounded in a rich heritage of blood and honor, and they have a great deal to offer serious students in today s dangerous world Unfortunately, in most modern schools that heritage has been lost It seems that the modern world and the marketing that drives it revolves around sports competition As a result, students in today s schools are only getting the surface features of a deeply rooted tradition, and even older styles of the traditional arts are gradually losing The Asian martial arts are grounded in a rich heritage of blood and honor, and they have a great deal to offer serious students in today s dangerous world Unfortunately, in most modern schools that heritage has been lost It seems that the modern world and the marketing that drives it revolves around sports competition As a result, students in today s schools are only getting the surface features of a deeply rooted tradition, and even older styles of the traditional arts are gradually losing their historical perspective From the Foreward by Dennis Palumbo Though I have some minor criticisms that I will mention in the notes I include here, this is truly an invaluable book The richness of the knowledge that Morgan conveys as well as the systematic, practical as well as philosophical, expression of how to live the warrior way is something that I deeply respect, honor, and have striven for in my own life and martial practice over the last three decades Morgan has a deep knowledge of the Asian martial arts one of my criticisms but it is still one of the best modern books on martial arts I have ever read which, as expressed in the book really are the Japanese, and to lesser extent Korean and Chinese You must be deadly serious in training When I say that, I do not mean that you should be reasonably diligent or moderately in earnest I mean that your opponent must always be present in your mind, whether you sit or stand or walk or raise your arms Gichin Funakoshi s First Rule for the Study of Karate Do Quoted in Chapter 1 of Forrest Morgan s Living the Martial Way Start today by thinking of yourself as a warrior Stop being a dentist or an accountant who does karate as a hobby and become a warrior who practices both his profession and karate to hone his spirit You ll discover that both your professional competence and your karate will improve But the true mastery in The Martial Way involvesthan a mere prowess and expertise The master warrior is a man of character, a man of wisdom and insight These goals are farelusive than those regarding technical expertise Elusive they may be, but you can begin the long road towards character development by learning to recognize and pursue internal versus external objectives 27 I hope martial artists areinterested in the root of martial arts and not the different decorative branches, flowers, or leaves It is futile to argue as to which leaf, which design of branches, or which attractive flower you like when you understand the root, you understand all its blossoming Bruce Lee, Tao of Jeet Kune Do 23 I have to disagree with Morgan s assertion that So once you reach the black belt level in your core art never, before then , you need to critically examine the holes and weaknesses in it and find other disciplines to fill in those gaps 47 This is absurd on numerous levels It requires a blind obedience and faith that is very much unmerited In the context of the chapter, Morgan is explaining how most martial arts styles have a limited doctrinal focus that conditions them to fight at a certain range Tae Kwon Do using kicks, Judo grappling, etc , and that one needs to have a core style and then build upon it to create an integrated style of one s own, as he, very insightfully, asserts that all martial arts systems are created, and that one really needs to be a well rounded and effective warrior, not just an adherent of a received style of martial arts I agree with this strongly, and I agree in training in a core style very assiduously with years of training and discipline Tae Kwon Do was my first martial arts style, and I spent years training at the very least two hours a day independently of classes in basic drills, etc it was a deep commitment and one should never enter a martial art without this commitment I have trained in many different martial arts styles since and consider Muay Thai to actually beof my core style now, with Eskrima, a style in which I have a black belt, to be a truly combat oriented extension and further development of my original core training however different Eskrima may be from Tae Kwon Do, Muay Thai, Ninjutsu, Kenpo, Karate, etc What I strongly disagree with is the idea that you should not critically think about a martial arts style before earning a black belt Instead, I would assert that it is essential to do so not to be contrarian or disrespectful, but to actually learn and be able to apply techniques or principles from the martial art in reality There is much excess in most modern commercialized martial arts, and anyone who asserts otherwise has not been to many dojos or contemporary tournaments and it is a lapse in critical thinking on his part to assert so, in my opinion, and a bit ironic as he writes very eloquently earlier in the book about the obsession with externals in the martial arts world now at tournaments, etc in sharp contrast to the rondori of Kano and the kumite of Funakoshi If someone asked me what a human being ought to devote the maximum of his time to, I would answer, Training Trainthan you sleep Karate Master Masutatsu Oyama 19 The warrior trains daily Physical conditioning, technical proficiency, tactical fluency, spiritual strength, emotional control these are the substances of his goals and the weapons of his arsenal Every day he devotes some amount of time to honing and polishing at least one of them Some days he pushes himself to the limits of his capability in one orto test his progress Friends, acquaintances, even family often think warriors aare obsessed or compulsive, but that isn t true Obsessive and compulsive behavior are, by definition, traits of individuals who are unable to control themselves The warrior is just the opposite he is the model of control The warrior doesn t seek pain, fear, fatigue, and the other unpleasant byproducts of constant training because he likes them But he knows they are obstacles between him and his objectives His goal is to overcome them, and he knows that to defeat an enemy, he must attack It isn t that the warrior is driven He is the driver Do you train daily, or does your training consist of going to class two or three evenings a week You say that s the only time your class meets Well, who says you have to be in class to train Warriors hone their skills constantly, and if you ve achieved the warrior mind set, you re looking for ways to fit some sort of training in every day Morgan 54 Dr Alan Hasegawa Paradoxically, in many respects, the need for shugyo is even greater in an affluent society The poet Berryman noted that the trouble with this country is that a man can live his entire life without knowing whether or not he is a coward He saw a society of complacency an ennui, which was a result of a life of shallow distractions and luxuries In an affluent society, it is necessary to purposely seek out the challenges which were once a part of the daily life of the warrior This drive to test the limits of one s own potential is universal Quoted on pages 59 60 Shugyo is defined by Morgan as ascetic training , but he describes his own experience anecdotally as training past the normal physical psychological breaking point and having the drive digging deep enough to go beyond it A notable defect, as would be expected with the title ancient Asian martial arts is that the cultural orientation of the text is geared primarily toward Japanese, and secondarily Chinese and Korean mainstream martial arts to the exclusion of other regions of Asia I mention this only because, when discussing religion, Morgan lists only four religions Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Shintoism There is no mention of Islam, which has been a religion in China for nearly 1400 years and there are very important Kung Fu styles that have been transmitted and preserved intact only among the Muslim peoples of China An excellent, excellent book overall I wish there werelike it

  5. Peggy Peggy says:

    Very good advice for the martial artist but he can be a bit over the top at times Most useful chapter for me Train Like Warriors Train.

  6. Thomas Dineen Thomas Dineen says:

    It s hard to add much to the praise that this superb book has already garnered, except to say that it s one of the most elegantly written and deeply felt texts in a field not always known for the verbal skill or cultural awareness of its authors Forrest Morgan concentrates not so much on fighting tactics or specific combat matters, but rather on how practitioners should conceive of martial arts study as a vital aspect of their daily lives The author s gravity and austere integrity are bracing, It s hard to add much to the praise that this superb book has already garnered, except to say that it s one of the most elegantly written and deeply felt texts in a field not always known for the verbal skill or cultural awareness of its authors Forrest Morgan concentrates not so much on fighting tactics or specific combat matters, but rather on how practitioners should conceive of martial arts study as a vital aspect of their daily lives The author s gravity and austere integrity are bracing, particularly in a field populated by sham practitioners Morgan brilliantly debunks many martial arts myths, explains how to choose the best discipline for one s purposes, and lays out a program to develop a warrior mindset in a culture that often overlooks the value of the martial virtues This finely crafted, probing work should be the first book read by anyone thinking about taking up martial arts It will also be an essential addition to the libraries of seasoned practitioners

  7. Don Don says:

    An OUTSTANDING book which helps Westerners integrate the way of the warrior into a pedestrian, set the bar lower please society.

  8. Jacob Aitken Jacob Aitken says:

    I think I had the same reaction to this book as everyone else it was groundbreaking when it first came out Looking back 20 years later, it s still very good but we have perhaps acritical view Forrest Morgan addresses the problem how can we live a warrior lifestyle in a non warrior society To answer that question we need to get beyond the strictly physical aspects of being a warrior and approach it via mental or maybe spiritual.Honor and integrity are what separates warriors from thu I think I had the same reaction to this book as everyone else it was groundbreaking when it first came out Looking back 20 years later, it s still very good but we have perhaps acritical view Forrest Morgan addresses the problem how can we live a warrior lifestyle in a non warrior society To answer that question we need to get beyond the strictly physical aspects of being a warrior and approach it via mental or maybe spiritual.Honor and integrity are what separates warriors from thugs I think what made this book click back then is kind of what makes Jordan Peterson click today I m not personally a fan of Peterson, but I do understand why people find him compelling He isn t a Marxist and he urges you to take charge of your life Good for him Morgan does the same thing, but without the Jungian baggage.His take on religion is balanced Some martial arts areclosely aligned with religions than others You just have to be discerning If we could boil this to a few quotes or main ideas, Morgan highlights the role of strategy in a warrior s mindset That s where this book is probably unique and what caught me off guard when I first read it Strategy is the essence of warriorship It lives in the heart of everything the warrior studies, practices, and does with his life.There are individuals who step beyond the mere technical mastery of artificial systems to touch the essence of personal warfare, the very soul of The Martial Way But you can t achieve this kind of mastery studying one system alone Remember, all systems are artificial The only goal truly worthy of a serious warrior s efforts is mastering The Martial Way itself There are some areas of the book I think are dated While Morgan was correct that we don t need as much protein as the average bodybuilder intakes, we needthan he gives us credit for Further, most people won t get bulky by working out Proof Check out the guy at the gym who has been lifting for the past 3 years and still weighs 150lbs Bruce Lee did standard weight training, 3x10 and while he had one of the greatest physiques of all time, he wasn t bulky With that said, he does have a point about training effectively While I do chin ups regularly, I never go to exhaustion and I don t need to do bicep curls I do kettlebell squats instead of regular squats While deadlift is king of exercises, I m too injury prone and kettlebell swings is probably a better exercise

  9. Rob Rob says:

    This is the book I ve been looking for for some time It won t teach you any martial arts, but it will teach you what you need to know to get the most out of any martial art you choose mindset, philosophy, etc It could also be applied to any number of non martial traditions It will probably be easier to understand if you are either in the military, a veteran, or have taken a martial art before, but anyone can get something out of this one.

  10. Kevin Kevin says:

    Well written guidebook for those looking to live a better andmeaningful life Must read for all those wanting to achieve at higher levels.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *