Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966 Kindle â

Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966 Kindle â

Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966 ✫ [PDF] ✑ Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966 By Paul Stronski ✸ – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Paul Stronski tells the fascinating story of Tashkent an ethnically diverse primarily Muslim city that became the prototype for the Soviet era reimagining of urban centers in Central Asia Based on ext Paul Stronski a Soviet Kindle Ö tells the fascinating story of Tashkent an ethnically diverse primarily Muslim city that became the prototype for the Soviet era Tashkent: Forging Epub / reimagining of urban centers in Central Asia Based on extensive research in Russian and Uzbek archives Stronski shows us how Soviet officials planners Forging a Soviet ePUB ☆ and architects strived to integrate local ethnic traditions and socialist ideology into a newly constructed urban space and propaganda showcaseThe Soviets planned to transform Tashkent from a feudal city of the tsarist era into a flourishing garden replete with fountains a lakeside resort modern roadways schools hospitals apartment buildings and of course factories The city was intended to be a shining example to the world of the successful assimilation of a distinctly non Russian city and its citizens through the catalyst of socialism As Stronski reveals the physical building of this Soviet city was not an end in itself but rather a means to change the people and their society Stronski analyzes how the local population of Tashkent reacted to resisted and eventually acuiesced to the city s socialist transformation He records their experiences of the Great Terror World War II Stalin s death and the developments of the Krushchev and Brezhnev eras up until the earthuake of which leveled large parts of the city Stronski finds that the Soviets established a legitimacy that transformed Tashkent and its people into one of the stalwart supporters of the regime through years of political and cultural changes and finally during the upheavals of glasnost.


About the Author: Paul Stronski

Is a a Soviet Kindle Ö well known author some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Tashkent Forging a Soviet City Tashkent: Forging Epub / – book this is one of the most wanted Paul Stronski author readers around the world.



4 thoughts on “Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966

  1. Amy Amy says:

    City planning often seems to be a new concept a trend towards community oriented design features that are usually intended to better a neighborhood or development by particular ordinances For example, in my area, the housing boom of the 1980s led to massive building without much consideration of long term community cohesiveness After that bubble burst, a new trend arrived, requiring builders to consider small design enhancements to afford a better feel to a city Encouraging front porches, City planning often seems to be a new concept a trend towards community oriented design features that are usually intended to better a neighborhood or development by particular ordinances For example, in my area, the housing boom of the 1980s led to massive building without much consideration of long term community cohesiveness After that bubble burst, a new trend arrived, requiring builders to consider small design enhancements to afford a better feel to a city Encouraging front porches, open space, altering lot layouts, and keeping garage doors from being seen from the main streets were ideas encouraged to prevent the cookie cutter home styles that arrived with the Baby Boom of the 1950s think Hicksville, NY However, in the past, city planning was not considered a trend at all Especially with the expansion West, cities were, at one point, often planned around where the city buildings, parks, and access roads would lie, and then the housing was built around that One especially fascinating account of city planning that is unlike anything I ve read before is Paul Stronski s book Tashkent Forging a Soviet City Stronski compiles the details of how this city was planned from both a civil and structural aspect, right down to an artistic vision of the daily life of its residents This was not small scale planning A political endeavor from the beginning, it was an ideological effort to demonstrate Soviet superiority and show the Western world the advancement that the Socialists confidently intended to promote.While the book covers a great deal of the planning stages, I m going to focus on two areas that were especially interesting to me First was the concept of engineering and building codes apparently even in Soviet Russia, builders wanted to cut corners The area of Central Asia was already determined to be the site of previous deadly earthquakes, but officials felt that since a 7.0 earthquake hadn t presumably occurred in a hundred years, they could lower the codes to only deal with the ramifications of a 7.0 earthquake instead of an 8.0 quake as initially considered This small difference in engineering, combined with hurried construction done on the cheap, with inferior materials, and built in ways that were not common to the builders tilt up construction was still something new in the region left the city vulnerable to earthquake damage Even when devastating earthquakes occurred nearby, officials were still bent on promoting an image rather than safety Tashkent urban planners still concentrated most of their attention on designing monumental structures.building a compact and beautiful public space was a quicker and easier way to impress and show the state s care for its citizens than building apartments or schools for the population No spoilers, but you can imagine how well that went, and what signaled the end of Tashkent.Another intention in designing Tashkent was to show that Soviet rule had a cultural side, and that it would be open to permitting ethnic and artistic diversity In detail, one section discusses how the city tried to incorporate cultural forms that would rival Europe One woman, Tamara Khanum, was one of the first Uzbek women to perform unveiled in the 1920s and became a People s Artist of the USSR She performed in various languages and became a spokesperson for the advanced Tashkent culture She, along with other women, were used to advance the Soviet cause by appearing to be images of female emancipation, at a time when the West had yet to acknowledge women s rights While the book is heavily detailed in discussing the planning and construction stages of Tashkent, it also sheds light on the Soviet mindset towards propaganda and their intentions A city that few have ever heard of, Tashkent seems an anomaly in the history of Soviet rule, especially given what was going on in Siberia to the North I think that is what I liked best about it it exposes another facet of the era that I hadn t run across in reading other history books


  2. Andrew Liu Andrew Liu says:

    Paul Stronski offers a stimulating and inspiring account of how the Soviet ideal of social progress and modernity works in the context of a central Asian city with its own tradition and culture He is well aware of those complex practices and tactics employed by local people to take advantage of state initiated projects to their own benefit and thus avoid add another cliche narrative of state vs society or modenrity vs backward local culture.


  3. Erma Odrach Erma Odrach says:

    This is a study of a Soviet city Tashkent, the center of Russian life in Central Asia, became the capital of Uzbec SSR in 1930 Under Soviet rule, the entire city was to be a carefully planned urban space with all reminders of its non Soviet past erased Gone were the mosques, most of the small adobe like houses, the marketplaces, the narrow streets, only to be replaced by blocks upon blocks of apartment buildings, factories, theaters and broad avenues for military parades The transformed Ta This is a study of a Soviet city Tashkent, the center of Russian life in Central Asia, became the capital of Uzbec SSR in 1930 Under Soviet rule, the entire city was to be a carefully planned urban space with all reminders of its non Soviet past erased Gone were the mosques, most of the small adobe like houses, the marketplaces, the narrow streets, only to be replaced by blocks upon blocks of apartment buildings, factories, theaters and broad avenues for military parades The transformed Tashkent soon became Moscow s shining star in the East, and it was to show the entire East thelight of socialism and help spread its revolutionary ideology around the globe Some residents of Tashkent resisted the changes, others gradually learned to accept them The book covers a lot of territory from 1930 1966 from Stalinism, to WWII, to the Krushchev and Brezhnev eras, then ends in 1966 when an earthquake 7.5 on the Richter scale struck Due to shoddy constuction and poor Soviet engineering, much of the city was levelled Even Lenin s monument in Red Square was a pile of rubble So much for the shining star what was to last hundreds of years, barely lasted 30.I enjoyed this well researched book because there s not much out there outside the former Slavic republics But it was a hard read, especially when I came to the earthquake part, given the horrific events in Japan Thanks to Amy Henry for the book at The Black Sheep Dances


  4. Les Les says:

    An outstanding history of Tashkent from Stalin to the 66 Earthquake that combines sociology and politics to explain the growth of the largest city in Central Asia Stronski is particularly good at showing how Soviet ideological imperatives met Uzbek reality Active efforts to create Soviet citizens through urbanization were not successful, but the passage of time ultimately accomplished many of Moscow s goals.


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