Hardcover ↠ Playground PDF Ú

Hardcover ↠ Playground PDF Ú



10 thoughts on “Playground

  1. Jay G Jay G says:

    Want to seebookish things from me Check out my Youtube channel day on the playground, 13 year old Butterball took a sock filled with batteries and beat up one of his closest friends, Maurice, sending him to the hospital Now, he is being forced to talk to a therapist, Liz, as part of his detention Butterball doesn t want Liz to uncover what really happened that day on the playground, but as their sessions continue, he begins to trust her with Want to seebookish things from me Check out my Youtube channel day on the playground, 13 year old Butterball took a sock filled with batteries and beat up one of his closest friends, Maurice, sending him to the hospital Now, he is being forced to talk to a therapist, Liz, as part of his detention Butterball doesn t want Liz to uncover what really happened that day on the playground, but as their sessions continue, he begins to trust her with his story Honestly, I wasn t expecting much from this book, but I was pleasantly surprised The plot is very predictable, but I think this book gives a great insight to how bullies are often vulnerable and bullied themselves I think the book could be very relate able for a lot of people Butterball is a great character who grows so much through out the story and I really enjoyed reading about him


  2. Reading Vacation Reading Vacation says:

    I was really surprised when Playground showed up in the mail Come on now WHAT could I have in common with a bully named Butterball I went into the book with really low expectations I WAS WRONG Playground was a deep thinking type of read for me and Butterball was a sort of hero I could see a lot of middle school and high school boys liking it.Butterball was an overweight African American kid from the city with umm a lot of issues At first, Butterball was not an easy character to identi I was really surprised when Playground showed up in the mail Come on now WHAT could I have in common with a bully named Butterball I went into the book with really low expectations I WAS WRONG Playground was a deep thinking type of read for me and Butterball was a sort of hero I could see a lot of middle school and high school boys liking it.Butterball was an overweight African American kid from the city with umm a lot of issues At first, Butterball was not an easy character to identify with He was stuck up, easily angered, and never happy with what he had I really did not like him That is, at first As I read on, and got farther into Butterball s crazy world, I saw where his personality and tendencies had come from He was the end product of his environment.The writing of Playground was definitely unique There was quite a colorful vocabulary that all of the characters used It felt like practically every other word was a swear word Granted, this is not the kind of talk I am used to, but I appreciated that 50 Cent was keeping it real I get it These kids are not going to talk like my friends and I talk.I was surprised how much I enjoyed reading about these characters Underneath it all, everyone is ultimately the same We are all affected by our surroundings, we all make mistakes, and we all hope for forgiveness I m glad I read Playground after all


  3. Lectus Lectus says:

    Read entire review on my blog you know 50 Cent could write Other than songs, that is He wrote this novel loosely inspired by his adolescence and with his 14 year old son in mind.I was very skeptical of this book and was surprised to find a very nicely, straight forward, touching and easy story to read I was evensurprised when I found myself liking it Because, yes, I liked it I m not into stories of bullies with a big redemption at the end an Read entire review on my blog you know 50 Cent could write Other than songs, that is He wrote this novel loosely inspired by his adolescence and with his 14 year old son in mind.I was very skeptical of this book and was surprised to find a very nicely, straight forward, touching and easy story to read I was evensurprised when I found myself liking it Because, yes, I liked it I m not into stories of bullies with a big redemption at the end and thank God this book wasn t like it Do kids even need a reason to bully Hmm In Playground Butterball is kind of a bully who at the same time is subtly bullied himself He hates his life and the fact that on top of being fat, he is also black or is it the other way around 50 Cent touches some of the issues that teens have self esteem, weight, identity, money, anger, frustration, friendship, etc But he does so as a whole that is, rather than Butterball telling us that he is the way he is because he s poor, he shows us how he lives so we come to our own understanding of how the way he lives leads to be how he is The story is moving, enjoyable and most of all, believable Schools and public libraries should have this book out front for display I think it is great material for a book discussion club group because it compels to thoughts, brain storming and ultimately, kids can relate to the story and offer their own solutions Solutions, yes, because as much as adults try to prevent and deal with bullying and all that goes wrong in a kid s life, ultimately, kids themselves are the ones who can offer the best inside to address their issues


  4. Ayala Levinger Ayala Levinger says:

    I like the story very much and it was good written Maybe because I am an adult I already saw the mistakes Burton aka Butterball made, was making and was going to make How he still didn t have a clue and needed to figure things out and it was very interesting to read how he figures things out I was only disappointed that the happy end had to contain the fat child becoming not fat any For me it could just be a perfectly happy end even if the writer allowed the main character to stay fat.


  5. Jessica Jessica says:

    Ugh I know that this book will appeal to certain readers And I know that those are the readers that needbooks to appeal to them But Well, the book is just so ugh But my criticisms of it come from such an old white lady perspective I was annoyed by the fact that his father stole shoes and there was no consequence I was annoyed that Butterball s growth was when he stood up for a little kid by menacing another kid I was annoyed that the illustration on the cover was of the cele Ugh I know that this book will appeal to certain readers And I know that those are the readers that needbooks to appeal to them But Well, the book is just so ugh But my criticisms of it come from such an old white lady perspective I was annoyed by the fact that his father stole shoes and there was no consequence I was annoyed that Butterball s growth was when he stood up for a little kid by menacing another kid I was annoyed that the illustration on the cover was of the celebrity author, not the character And it was so hard to relate to Butterball s shame and anger over his mom being view spoiler outed hide spoiler when I see so little shameful about that I just couldn t find that as a justification for his brutal attack


  6. Chrissey Chrissey says:

    Not only has 50 Cent provided a decent resource for young folks and those who support them, but he s written a relatively enjoyable novel besides He makes a great case for the theory that bullies are often bullied themselves, and provides relatable insight into a mean kid s secret thoughts and vulnerabilities Sure the plot is predictable, and the characters are littlethan tired stereotypes, but overall this book is pretty damn a ight.


  7. Henry Alimanestianu Henry Alimanestianu says:

    As soon as I started reading this book, I knew that I was going to like it I knew this because it starts off with Butterball hitting Maurice in the face with a sock full of batteries, and I don t like it because I like that gruesome stuff a lot because I don t I like it because it captivated me almost immediately and I wanted to find out why he did this From then on it remained an interesting book.


  8. Agais Garcia Agais Garcia says:

    This book is based on a kid and he was not rich and is mom and dad were not together He was fat and he would get mad at kids that made fun of him In one part he had stold up to a and he had hit the kid with a sock with batters and the story grabed you with a fight at the start of the book and that is a good start to the book I think you should realy this book its a book for a good life lesson to show you to stand up to your bully


  9. Erica Erica says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here SPOILER ALERT Meet Butterball No, not his real name, but with a name like Burton and an extra 75 some odd pounds, sure doom would be met in the middle school locker room Butterball isn t your average middle school kid he s what one might refer to as an anger management problem no middle school principal wants to deal with In 50 Cent s YA novel, Playground, Butterball wants respect, he wants his mom and dad to resume an imperfect marriage to keep him happy, a reminder that he is a very young SPOILER ALERT Meet Butterball No, not his real name, but with a name like Burton and an extra 75 some odd pounds, sure doom would be met in the middle school locker room Butterball isn t your average middle school kid he s what one might refer to as an anger management problem no middle school principal wants to deal with In 50 Cent s YA novel, Playground, Butterball wants respect, he wants his mom and dad to resume an imperfect marriage to keep him happy, a reminder that he is a very young adult with center of the universe syndrome, and he wants to move back to the city, a city that he always describes asexciting than its reality, but Butterball can t get no respect , he cannot force his recently out of the closet mother to remain in a straight marriage , nor can he move back to the city from the burbs This is quite a lot for our young anti hero to deal with, so he does the only thing an anti hero would do he takes a sock full of batteries and pulverizes the only male student who showed him any kindness in his new school Of course punishment is inevitable enter Liz, middle aged white social worker looking to make the world a better place Butterball, in the way that most thugs and delinquents would react, only bares his soul after Liz is able to make a meaningful social workery connection, thus providing a safe environment for Butterball to come to three realizations he shouldn t pick on someone smaller or bigger than himself, his mom is gay and no amount of pouting is going to change it, and he is never moving back to the trouble filled metropolis.In the end, Butterball embraces his given name, thus shedding the baggage associated with it, and applies for entrance into a Creative Arts magnet school, courtesy of soul saving social worker Liz Burton, it appears is on the straight and narrow.In terms of complexity of plot, Playground is clich It seems as though the writer has followed a recipe with one secret ingredient Take one angry, overweight city kid who mistakes respect with fear, place him in an unfamiliar setting a safe environment , then make him beat someone up, add in caring adults who only want the best for said bully, then have bully get a taste of his own medicine Blend ingredients, and after 165 pages, make bully realize that violence is not the answer Be sure to include a homosexual mother who will reveal her sexual identity to her family thus creating a deep level of angst for our young anti hero thus providing him with a reason to act out Other than his secret ingredient, the story of the bully getting schooled by another larger and faster than himself and then suddenly realizing that maybe he shouldn t beat up those smaller than himself has been done before The lack of emotional complexity in the character who has an epiphany moment and changes his entire perspective on how the world works and therefore how he should behave within it creates a shallow story line that is predictable, not to mention unbelievable.In terms of original, believable, relatable characters, this book provides none Cringe worthy character stereotypes are abundant the angry young African American male who rages against the injustice of having to conform to a set of societal rules the deadbeat African American dad who teaches his child that stealing is OK and intimidation and violence are ways to earn respect the hard working single African American mother trying to put herself through school, a roof over her and her child s head, food on the table, and a better opportunity for her child who can never seem to get ahead the bully s target, a skinny book worm who could never have fought back against his attacker even if he had seen it coming a Caucasian social worker, the benevolent problem solver, who sees nothing but potential in an African American violent juvenile The characters are oversimplified, and end up reinforcing some of the uncomfortable beliefs about race that books by influential cultural icons should seek to debunk.As far as protagonists are concerned, while Butterball is a stereotype he is also completely unlikable from beginning to the end He is a character worthy of being despised and does not redeem himself throughout the course of the novel Yes, he is an adolescent who should have some level of naivet , but the assumption of a certain level of innocence in a young adult character does not make the reader feel empathetic towards this particular youth Butterball is not a character most readers can identify with and many will find his faulty reasoning and his lack of change at the end of the book unsettling If we are to become invested in a story, we must feel like that if the protagonist is unlikable, something will happen that changes our perception of him I do not want to walk with Butterball He is repulsive in his desire to hurt others emotionally and harm others physically because he desires respect, which he never actually realizes is not respect, but fear that causes people to move out of his way Even after he himself is physically attacked and hurt, I cheer for the Terrence , Butterball s intended target, because Butterball had it coming The fact that Butterball is left alone and in pain, strikes no chord of sympathy in the reader Even after he is assaulted, Butterball only shallowly understands the meaning of what he did to his own victim, Maurice We want Butterball to apologize, to make amends, to understand how awful his actions were, but he does not Instead, he is rewarded with an application to a school where he will be able to pursue his filming passion How can the reader be happy for this outcome, when he has not done what a protagonist must do leave a reader feeling satisfied 50 Cent wrote this loosely autobiographical book for his son, and in doing so, identified his audience as the YA set Being well aware of this age group, messages should be carefully crafted to leave the reader with something to think about long after the book is shelved 50 Cent addresses bullying first and foremost in his novel Considering there is very little consequence for Butterball after seriously injuring another student, very little remorse on his part for what he had done, and so little character change in terms of understanding the effects of his behavior on others, we can loosely construe the message that while bullying is problem, there are little protections available for those who are bullied And even worse, let the bully be rewarded by potentially being accepted into a fantastic program for gifted students The lack of empathy and remorse Butterball has is frightening his lack of redemption unsettling Sure, Butterball has one moment of tears on Liz s couch, but that is the extent of his change 50 Cent s message is not only superficial and unrealistic, it is also dangerous The author s attitude towards the subject is nothing less than cold as he clearly sympathizes with the offender and not the victims perhaps an unwittingly revealed insight into the rapper and his profanity riddled, misogynistic, violent music.Some readers may find the graphics included within the pages to be entertaining They are doodles at best, and do little to lighten the reader s burden The profanity in the book seems cleansed it is neither hard core, nor moderately toned down probably because publishers were aware of the target audience and would not be able to market a book without white washing it The writing cannot be described as excellent in terms of its complexity in syntax, structure, or semantics Dialect may be slightly representative of an inner city speech pattern, but the protagonist does not stay true to the dialect outside of his old neighborhood, nor does his mother emulate any of the dialect causing the reader to wonder where and when Butterball would have developed and learned to modify his semi inner city slang speech patterns Again, the idea of editorial language cleansing is apparent.Overall, I would find say that this book is a rather un notable contribution to the YA genre One of thesignificant points where this book misses the mark, is that the protagonist should be free from adult moralizing Butterball makes all of his decisions knowing full well what he adult world expects of him, ethically his mom, Liz and unethically his dad He weighs his decisions against adult expectations, defying his mom because he is angry with her decisions and giving into the stereotypical decisions of an African American thug father figure Secondly, 50 Cent could have contributed a valuable insight into African American culture, but instead he reinforces stereotypes As a cultural icon 50 Cent has credibility We can all surmise what his struggles were growing up 50 Cent in his own life found success, probably through some hard learned lessons, yet, when he had a chance to create a character that embodied a positive message, he created one that found an easy way out and never had to really own up to his mistakes Perhaps if Butterball had been portrayed as an individual character not so gracefully facing pressures outside of his control, who makes a mistake and finds solace and redemption in a unique skill or passion which is then used to find forgiveness, the reader would find the bookbelievable or relatable Additionally, while the book deals with contemporary issues, it does not do so in what could be called a responsible manner Consequences for bullying should be faced, redemption found, and an understanding of the long reaching effects of one s actions should be realized none of which happen in Playground As a result, the reader is left with a sense of hopelessness instead of hope Alas, this is not the story told In all honesty, if the Playground had been written under a pseudonym or by another author, I highly doubt it would have made it past the editor s slush pile But since it has, this story may be a good comparison point for other books that deal with bullying such as Wonder by Patricia Palaccio, Buddha Boy by Kathe Koja, Everyone Sees the Ants by AS King, Send by Patty Blount, and The Skin I m In by Sharon Flake It may also be a good entry point to books for reluctant readers, but I would caution that this novel not be given to any child who as ever suffered at the hands of a bully lest the emotional damage already inflicted on the child me magnified


  10. Yash Parikh Yash Parikh says:

    Curtis Jackon III is the reason I picked this book up Yes, 50 Cent is the author of this book, and yes, he wrote a compelling story I couldn t put down Unlike many of the other mostly autobiographical novels from other artists, 50 cent creates a story here that is uniquely his own venture into the fiction category Butterball, an obese young adolescent, struggles with issues that the average reader most likely couldn t even imagine Issues bigger than the constant flood of fat jokes like do Curtis Jackon III is the reason I picked this book up Yes, 50 Cent is the author of this book, and yes, he wrote a compelling story I couldn t put down Unlike many of the other mostly autobiographical novels from other artists, 50 cent creates a story here that is uniquely his own venture into the fiction category Butterball, an obese young adolescent, struggles with issues that the average reader most likely couldn t even imagine Issues bigger than the constant flood of fat jokes like don t think you need the extra butter, boy The story begins with action a fight scene that readers soon realize is a quintessential part of the life of Butterball Shortly thereafter, the story continues on a very micro level, focussing in on Butterball s life in Long Island, meeting with a counselor who does nothing but anger him The reason for his visits Butterball filled a sock with D batteries and used it to trash Maurice all for popularity and acceptance And please, don t forget Butterball is also smart when he applies himself and a fantastic cinematographer who gets offers to schools of art As ironic as it may seem, with each question from the counselor that probes into the past life of Butterball, it becomes easier and easier to sympathize with Butterball As the story unravels, Butterball takes us through the lead up to his seemingly largest fight Along the way, he encounters skirmishes, theft, and his father s encouragement of the very things that make Butterball this violent individual Each incident only strengthens his resolve and his lust for his father and New York or so it seems In truth, the reinforcement to his character is nothingthan a thin layer of sealant that fills the holes in his life When he attempts once again to fit in with society, he gets humiliated he becomes the victim of violence and peer pressure It s at this point that he realizes that he must turn to the counselor to turn his life around, and shed the persona that follows him of a playground bully hence the name of the story The book, published in 2012, is an analysis of psychology, society, and a notice about the struggles kids can face wrapped up into the story of a young, up and coming cinematographer whose life is a daily fight With this book, 50 Cent nails character development and writes a compelling frame narrative that will serve to teach his son lessons for the future.The takeaway from this book is that 50 Cent is truly gifted not only with a mike in his hand The manner in which he is able to paint a picture in 314 pages that resounds with all people, regardless of age while still mentioning the horrors present in society is absolutely brilliant It seems as though one character is enough, no matter the reader, thanks to the intricacy with which this book was written Butterball alone carries the weight of the world and all of the lessons it offers


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Playground ❰Reading❯ ➸ Playground Author 50 Cent – Centrumpowypadkowe.co.uk Thirteen year old Butterball doesn t have much going for him He s teased mercilessly about his weight He hates the Long Island suburb his mom moved them to and wishes he still lived with his dad in th Thirteen year old Butterball doesn t have much going for him He s teased mercilessly about his weight He hates the Long Island suburb his mom moved them to and wishes he still lived with his dad in the city And now he s stuck talking to a totally out of touch therapist named Liz Liz tries to uncover what happened that day on the Playground a day that landed one kid in the hospital and Butterball in detention Butterball refuses to let her in on the truth, and while he evades her questions, he takes readers on a journey through the moments that made him into the Playground bully he is todayThis devastating yet ultimately redemptive story is told in voice driven prose and accented with drawings and photographs, making it a natural successor to The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian Loosely inspired byCent s own adolescence, and written with his fourteen year old son in mind, Playground is sure to captivate wide attention and spark intense discussion.